Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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What makes DNA helical?

Why isn't DNA like RNA; why isn't RNA like DNA, that is, helical? Why are RNA chains straight?
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89 views

Ribosomal Turing Machines, DNA/RNA computation

I'm a computer science guy, recently crossing over to do some research in computational biology on RNA secondary structure prediction. While looking through the materials I got a crazy idea, what if ...
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1answer
147 views

How is the transcription direction of RNA polymerase determined?

When transcription factors attach to the DNA strand - How do they know in which direction they have to initialize the transcription by rna polymerase? Is it always read in the same direction anyway? ...
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1answer
86 views

is it possible to completely reconstruct a family tree by DNA comparison alone?

Having DNA samples of all or almost all members of a population of, say, a few hundred or thousand individuals, is it possible to draw the entire family tree of those individuals? (Let's not assume ...
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1answer
1k views

Difference in length of Okazaki fragments

The length of Okazaki fragments in the lagging strand is about 100-200 nucleotides in eukaryotes and about 1000-2000 nucleotides in prokaryotes. What (molecular mechanism, enzyme type ) ...
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1answer
24 views

book on genealogy, haplogroups, migrations, etc

Looking for a popular science book on the topic. I need a wide-angle expose, not fiddling with minor details. It should also be somehow intertwined with migration. I've recently learned, for example, ...
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24 views

What percentage of chimeric takes up in a cDNA library?

I get a cDNA library of species of Mollusca,and complete some of the clones with polyA tails.But when I translate them with three frames,I find there is a large percentage of sequences that cannot ...
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2answers
133 views

Single stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis

From http://www.nfstc.org/pdi/Subject05/pdi_s05_m01_01.htm : ... The separation medium contains a denaturant in order that the electrophoresis is conducted on single-stranded DNA fragments. ...
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45 views

On which part of the DNA will the new DNA nucleotide connect? [closed]

My question is: Where will the new DNA nucleotide connect on the (part of the) DNA shown on the picture? Will it connect to the phosphate group? What does the 5' --> 3' mean? Thank you in ...
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1answer
46 views

Activity of DNA glycosylase

I am wondering how DNA glycosylase works from the chemical point of view. Sometimes in papers I can see that they are doing activity assays with 1M NaOH and I am trying to understand why using 1M NaOH ...
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3answers
75 views

dsDNA translation

Since DNA is double stranded and each strand is complementary to the other, the codons on each strand will come out to be different after transcription(depending on the reading frame). Does this mean ...
2
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1answer
252 views

Properties of Satellite Chromosomes

I have some questions regarding Satellite chromsomes which could not be resolved by a google search. Does the satellite consist of telomeric sequences ? If not, What is the function of a satellite ? ...
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1answer
41 views

Conclusions from hybridization results

A double stranded DNA was denatured in a mixture that included mRNA from a gene in the segment. The mixture was then cooled to promote RNA and DNA hybridization. The following figure the results. ...
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41 views

Anti-parallel DNA code operons

Coming from a software engineering standpoint, suppose I have a string of code like so: ... 5'-ATAGAC-3' ... ... 3'-TATCTG-5' ... Assume the above code is part of a larger segment. Now, reading ...
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1answer
117 views

Genes, chromosomes, base pairs and the 23 pairs

OK so I'm a bit confused. Does a chromosome consist of genes and do genes consist of DNA? What about the 23 pairs in sexual reproduction? I can't remember what the pairs consist of
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1answer
55 views

How was Restriction Site of EcoRI sequenced?

The sequence of restriction site of EcoRI - GAATTC was identified in the early 1970s, before Sanger Sequencing was invented.(1977) How was the restriction site of EcoRI sequenced ?
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3answers
6k views

Evolutionarily speaking, why do humans have 46 chromosomes

In humans, each cell normally contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. Monkeys, chimpanzees, and Apes have 24 pairs (twenty-four pairs), for a total of 48. What caused humans to have 46? ...
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1answer
269 views

Why Only DNA can Contain Hereditary Material?

Well I'm well aware that it is proven that DNA contains genetic material via transformation and Hershey-Chase Experiment of T2 bacteriophage. Still I was wondering what is the reason only DNA ...
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1answer
33 views

What information do microarray image convey?

OK I have read that a cell generates 4 kinds of digital (to be precise discrete) data namely DNA, RNA, Protein (sequences that can be encoded as string sequences of nucleotides/ amino acids) and micro ...
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4answers
2k views

Why are there exactly four nucleobases in DNA?

Does someone know why DNA is composed of four nucleobases? In particular, is there an explanation for the number? Why four and not two, or eight?
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32 views

Cloning an extinct species - how far are we? [duplicate]

What is the state of the art regarding cloning an extinct species? I don't mean Jurassic Park stuff, but for example extinct animals for which well preserved DNA and a reasonably adequate extant ...
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3answers
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Why are 3 nucleotides used as codons for amino-acid mapping in DNA?

DNA is made of 4 unique nucleotides. When coding for a protein, a sequence of 3 nucleotides is used to code for each amino acid. Why are codons 3 nucleotides in length? A related question can be ...
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1answer
24 views

Size of DNA in phage

I have read that DNA(after recombination) is packaged in bacteriophages lambda only if it's between 40000 and 53000 bp long. This constraint can be used to ensure packaging of recombinant DNA. I ...
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0answers
24 views

Why does the stability of YAC increase with size?

From Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry : The stability of YAC increases with size (up to a limit). Those with inserts of less than 100000 are gradually lost during mitosis. Why does this ...
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54 views

how does DNA and RNA work [closed]

How do the DNA modules tell the cell what to do?
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32 views

Planar circular DNA and protein [closed]

I am trying to develop a planar (two dimensional) lattice based framework to simulate ring (circular) DNA and proteins. To verify my model, I need to simulate real DNA and proteins. The base idea for ...
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1answer
66 views

Percentage of understood human DNA [closed]

I want to know what's the approximate percentage of understood human DNA, as in, which part does what. I'm not asking for details, just the amount. Thank you.
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127 views

Does the genetic material the sperm carries affect it's physical properties

Basically, what I'm asking is, is the actual sperm cell built from the blueprint in the DNA of the man or is it itself also a consequence of the DNA it carries? I'd like to know a few more things ...
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1answer
88 views

How does GC-content evolve?

Background GC-content refers to the frequency of base pairs that are either C or G in the genome, or in other words the number of GC base pairs divided by the addition of the number of GC base pairs ...
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53 views

relative-rate of evolution

I am supposed to calculate the relative rate of evolution of two sequences (human and sheep) with a chicken serving as the outgroup. The sequences are pretty long, so I will just create a short ...
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1answer
596 views

Why do three nucleotides code for one amino acid? Why not 5 nucleotides? [duplicate]

We all know why there are 3-base codons, and why there aren't any 2-base codons. But why is there not a 4-base a 5-base codon?
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1answer
436 views

What is Luc Montagnier's research on electromagnetic signals from DNA about?

After reading a Youtube comment, I started reading on Luc Montagnier's research on electromagnetic signals from DNA. I haven't been able to find a source that would clearly explain what it's about. I ...
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2answers
53 views

Can protein precipitate out in alcohol during DNA extraction?

In common lab sessions to extract DNA from strawberry or cheek cells, will there be protein contaminating the DNA extract in alcohol? If so, how can we prevent protein from precipitating out of the ...
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1answer
37 views

In what circumstances does a mammalian egg copy its DNA?

In the 2nd episode of the new Cosmos series, the host Neil deGrasse Tyson shows how the white-furred bear could have evolved (reasonable scientific speculation, of course). If you haven't seen that ...
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1answer
89 views

What is the mechanism of labeling a DNA molecule with deuterated water?

I have seen a paper in which deuterated water was used to follow dividing cells. The assumption was that deuterated water will be incorporated into newly synthesized DNA molecules. Is there any direct ...
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1answer
46 views

How does DNA resolve on size exclusion resin?

We generally have a good idea of how DNA separates using agarose gel electrophoresis, how well does DNA resolve on a SEC resin like superose? I get the impression that salt influences where it elutes. ...
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condensed protocol for sequencing a portion of human DNA from buccal sample

Anyone have a short & sweet protocol for PCR amplifying a region of human DNA (chromosomal or mt, I don't care) extracted from a buccal sample: including validated primer sequences and preferred ...
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1answer
28 views

Telomerase in tetrahymena

In this amazing video, at 26:03 we see this image We now know that the telomerase contains a sequence complementary to the telomere sequence and so is able to do what it is capable of doing in this ...
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1answer
75 views

How to measure quality and quantity of DNA?

I would like to mesure DNA. I quantify the concentration with Qubit fluorometer, but I would like to know also quality of DNA. I try BioAnalyzer (Agilent),but without success. Bioanalyzer measure DNA ...
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3answers
65 views

Does DNA influence death (e.g. by cell aging)

I know that we age because of errors in the cell replication process and these errors eventually leads to death. If we exclude environmental factors, are there any other factors that can cause these ...
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DNA of the human body?

If our DNA determines certain patterns within the human body such as hair color and eye color, if scientists were able to "turn off" such as the gene for eye color after the pattern was established, ...
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1answer
32 views

Concentration of DNA by isopropanol

I have read that DNA can be concentrated by addition of isopropanol. What does "concentrated" mean? What does isopropanol do on a molecular level to concentrate DNA?
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1answer
66 views

Understanding DNA supercoiling

While trying to understand DNA supercoiling, I came across these lines in the book Genetics by Ursula Goodenough : All natural DNA is superhelical. The axis of the duplex itself follows a ...
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1answer
31 views

If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?

In the above title question, can the protein thats altered not be isolated (to separate out from other proteins) somehow? Is there nothing that can bind to the specific cancer proteins that will not ...
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51 views

Functioning of EDTA

I know that EDTA chelates metal ions. It weakens bacterial cell wall and inactivates the DNases. What is the reason why it can do so ? I guess it can inactivate DNases by altering the ...
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2answers
130 views

Is solving cancer required in order to avoid aging?

When the telomerase enzyme is not active the telomere shortens every time the cell duplicates leading to a reproductive limit (Hayflicks limit). On one hand this is a believed reason for aging. On the ...
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271 views

How many transcription factors are there?

In molecular biology and genetics, a transcription factor is a protein that binds to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the flow (or transcription) of genetic information from DNA to ...
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If everybody DNA is different then how blood can match even with matching blood group?

We know that everybody's DNA pattern is different in the world. Then how can ´we transfer blood from one person to another person and this person can survive ?
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42 views

Functioning of BRCA2

I know that BRCA2 interacts with RAD51 to repair DNA damage. But how exactly does it function ? What are the other proteins that interact with it ?
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1answer
48 views

How can I re-format my DNA motifs' position weight matrices?

I am working with a set of DNA motifs that are predicted as potential regulatory motifs (e.g. transcription factor binding sites). The motifs belong to several species, and I wanted to cluster these ...