Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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Since nature highly favors the pyranose forme of Ribose, what explains the fact we find it in the form of furanose in DNA and RNA?

I read in my notes that relative abundance of ribopyranose represents about 80% of all ribose in solution (including the alpha and beta anomeres). I'm curious as to why evolution favored the use of ...
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Why does supercoiled DNA run faster?

The DNA exists in linear and cirular forms. The latter form has interesting feature called Supercoiling. The more number of writhe makes it more supercoiled because of which it gets more compact. ...
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Restriction sites

I would like to know: how many restriction sites does a restriction enzyme use on a DNA molecule? In other words: If a sequence on a plasmid contains the following bases: ATTGCAGTCTG and I want ...
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Why can't we use plasmids to add genes to ourselves?

Reading these answers I wonder, why doesn't "gene therapy" use self-contained plasmids instead of trying to splice a length into a chromosome?
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Can females be recreated from male DNA?

A chromosomal male is XY and a chromosomal female is XX. Now imagine if, one day, this world has only males - is it possible to "recreate" a female by using two X chromosomes from two different males? ...
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How did the first life form on Earth reproduce without DNA?

So, the best explanation I can think of for the first life form, life happening from nothing (wow), is that over billions of years, with trillions of water molecules and dust particles and chemicals ...
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374 views

How do two parents, recessive and dominant genes and two complimentary nucleotides end up in one DNA? [closed]

In the basic school, I was taught that half of genome is received from father and another half comes from mother in the form of double-helix DNA, whose first helix consists of dominant nucleotide ...
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133 views

What happens after the purification step in Hi-C sequencing?

I am a statistician reading an article on Hi-C, and I am trying to better understand one of the steps in the DNA isolation and sequencing process. Since I'm a statistician, please try to avoid too ...
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1answer
98 views

How do eukaryotes terminate transcription? (clarification on Campbell Biology)

I'm having trouble understanding how eukaryotes terminate transcription. Studying Campbell Biology (pg. 342, 10th ed.), I read: In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II transcribes the polyadenylation ...
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What makes DNA sticky-ends sticky?

When restriction enzymes jaggedly cut double stranded DNA it results in so called sticky ends. What is the substance that makes the DNA sticky?
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Using Q solution with ready made MasterMix

I am exploring the possibility of using Q solution (5x) to get rid of non specific bands in PCR. I mostly use a MasterMix and not separate aliquots of dNTPs, Taq, buffer etc. In principle, adding Q ...
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42 views

What are constrained genetic elements?

I am somewhat of a newbie in evolutionary biology currently taking my first steps in bioinformatics. I was reading a paper when I came across the term "constrained genetic elements", referring to ...
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45 views

blastn: What substitution matrix is used?

I'm currently working aligning sequences, and I need to compute similarity between pairs of DNA 'words' of a particular length. For amino acids I am able to use the substitution matrices in Biopython ...
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1answer
58 views

In the future, it is plausible that we can change the physical appearance of a living animal by editing DNA?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/revealed-scientists-edit-dna-to-correct-adult-genes-and-cure-diseases-9273555.html This article explains that scientists managed to change the DNA of adult ...
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1answer
87 views

How does NHEJ cause indels?

I was reading up on CRISPR-cas9 and how it works and I am having trouble wrapping my head around how NHEJ to repair the DSB can cause indels to occur. Shouldn't the NHEJ just stick the two strands of ...
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1answer
75 views

What DNA has the most info for getting a person's likeness? [closed]

I understand that DNA can come from hair but also from other places. Let's suppose a person gets their DNA mapped by a company (there are some companies claiming to offer analysis of DNA.. e.g. maybe ...
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1k views

Are all Y-chromosomes the same?

Since the Y-chromosome can only pass from male to male child, it would seem to pass intact. Thus, a boy's Y-chromosomes would, I guess, be the same as his father's. Going backwards, would not all men ...
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58 views

Is studying complete mitochondrial genome need biological lab work?

The research complete mitochondrial genome study done on species: Juema pig Sus scrofa (Suina: Suidae) from southern Gansu red rainbowfish speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus white char Salvelinus ...
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29 views

Need clarification on a sentence regarding vesicle-mediated translocation

I've chanced upon a passage that is not entirely clear to me: In addition to conjugation, transformation and transduction, other less well recognised mechanisms of DNA uptake occur in nature, ...
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27 views

Why I obtain larger bands than expected after minipreparation?

guys! I made a "home made" minipreparation to obtain my plasmid+insert (totalizing approximately 6Kb). But, when I run a agarose gel, I saw a unique band with 10Kb. Why?
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75 views

What is the fate of micronucleus DNA?

Micronuclei are cellular structures that are formed as a by-product of, usually, defective mitosis. The piece of chromosome in a micronucleus may, or may not contain a centromere and the DNA is ...
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1answer
33 views

Bioinformatics - DNA binding, sequence-specific protein data

I am a computer scientist and we are working on protein function prediction algorithms. Right now, we would like to examine protein-DNA binding properties computationaly. For this, we would make use ...
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162 views

Why does nature use a 4-level system (DNA) to encode information?

First, I am not a biologist, so this question might be naive: All of our information processing and storing is based on 2-level logic, bits with 0 and 1. Now, DNA stores the information in a 4-level ...
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50 views

Nature of Dengue Fever Genetic Material

Once the genetic material for Dengue Fever is inserted into the human DNA, would the Dengue Fever molecular material be in the form of its own isolated DNA fragment or will it be inserted directly ...
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569 views

Does the genetic material the sperm carries affect its physical properties

Basically, what I'm asking is, is the actual sperm cell built from the blueprint in the DNA of the man or is it itself also a consequence of the DNA it carries? I'd like to know a few more things ...
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Is it possible to amplify every single piece of DNA through PCR?

Is there a way to perform non-specific PCR amplification for the purpose of amplifying every piece of DNA present?
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80 views

Complexity in creating transgenic animals (e.g., mice)

Many papers I have seen describing transgenic rodent models (and presumably applicable to other model organisms) involve the knock-in, or modification to, a single gene, possibly two genes. With ...
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Solubility of DNA in water

This would seem to be an easy to answer question, but I was unable to find an answer (in g/L) for generic double-stranded DNA or plasmid neither on Google nor on BioNumbers. I would expect the ...
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52 views

Are genes on the 5' to 3' strand only?

I confused myself during studying, and wanted to confirm something. Since transcription via RNA polymerases only takes place in the 5'to 3' direction, that would mean that that 5' to 3' strand is the ...
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2answers
56 views

Organ donation compatibility based on DNA

As far as I know, multiple tests are made before organ transplant to determine matching. Would it be possible to do the matching based on the DNA of the patients, rather than the actual serum ...
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30 views

There are 6 classifications of CFTR mutations. Is a causal relationship to the sweat test known?

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene for the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The CFTR mutations are classified in 6 classes. The sweat test is ...
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44 views

Diffuse DAPI staining after time in tissue

My student is using ProLong Gold with DAPI (premixed) on sheep uterine tissue. We have used this reagent for some time with great results. Now, when she finishes her immunofluorescence protocol, ...
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1answer
48 views

Are genes uniformly dispersed throughout the genome?

I think that telomeres and centromeres are regions with a very low gene content (= regions that contain few genes). To the exception of telomeres and centromeres, are genes uniformly distributed ...
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Why would mutation rates increase in a tumour?

This article describes a tumour: Swanton found that even the primary tumour was surprisingly varied. He found 128 mutations among the various samples, but only a third of these were common to all ...
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Which organism has the smallest genome length?

Which animal/plant/anything has smallest length genome?
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Is nuclear DNA immuno-privileged?

It is well known that if DNA occurs in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, an immune response may be triggered through a myriad of DNA receptors and pathways as part of the immuno response. Yet, ...
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82 views

Specific numbers of nucleotides in Okazaki fragments

Okazaki fragments are formed during replication of the lagging DNA strand. What determines the length of these fragments?
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552 views

Why are nitrogenous bases of DNA hydrophobic if they can hydrogen bond?

Why are nitrogenous bases of DNA hydrophobic if they can hydrogen bond? Is it that they are only relatively hydrophobic? This forum explains it but does not give an example of the structure.
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Is there a biological mechanism for evolution encoded into our DNA?

Throughout high school, I remember learning about Darwin's theory of evolution as if it were near-fact. But something always seemed wrong about the ideas presented. Survival of the fittest Random ...
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What happens when a genome is shorter than the other? [closed]

Say there were 2 creatures of the same species. Creature 1 has a longer genome than creature 2, it may be just a few base pairs, but what would happen when the genes were crossed to create creature 3 ...
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2answers
101 views

What is the DNA Sequence for an apple?

The title says it all. I'm just curious. I read that scientists mapped the genome for Malus Domestica, but I can't find a sequence anywhere.If this is a stupid question, I would appreciate if you tell ...
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103 views

Evolution of the Redundancy of the Genetic Code

In short Looking at the genetic code, it appears that most redundancy is on the third letter rather than on the first or the second letter of the codon. Why has it evolved this way? Longer version ...
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1answer
86 views

Is each generation getting older? [duplicate]

So we know that our sperm and egg cells get set aside relatively early so that they aren't going through unnecessary cell divisions and causing DNA damage or telomere shortening, but since each new ...
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1answer
57 views

How semi-synthetic cell with artificial DNA works

I know that by now this is old new but I heard that a cell that used a synthetic pair of nucleotides, called X and Y, have been made. My question was, how did the cell understand the X and Y ...
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Life without DNA?

I'm by no means an expert in the field, merely a curious visitor, but I've been thinking about this and Google isn't of much help. Do we know of any lifeforms that don't have the conventional ...
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Does bromophenol blue cause a shadow on agarose gels stained with SYBR Gold?

Bromophenol blue in loading dye is known to cast shadows/absorb emitted light signal from DNA on Ethidium bromide gels during imaging. But if SYBR Gold is instead used as the nucleic acid stain, does ...
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386 views

What makes DNA helical?

Why isn't DNA like RNA; why isn't RNA like DNA, that is, helical? Why are RNA chains straight?
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C Form DNA Base Pairs Per Turn

How does C-DNA have 9.33 base pairs per turn? The number of base pairs should be quantised. How can it be a decimal?
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Linear and Circular DNA

So school has taught us that eukaryotes have DNA that is linear and inside of a membrane - called the nucleus. And that prokaryotes have circular DNA that is free floating inside of the cell. We ...
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Why do many DNA solutions contain additional compounds?

DNA solubility data in only water is scarce. A previous question asked for a quantification of DNA solubility in water. It seemed like it would be easily answerable, however isn't quite that simple ...