Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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Could we engineer humans to behave like insects? [closed]

First off, though complex, I'm assuming insects are at an earlier evolutionary stage than humans. That being said, could humans be genetically engineered to behave like insects? I'm not talking about ...
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429 views

why is DNA antiparallel? Can it be parallel?

My biology textbook mentions that DNA is antiparallel and it got me wondering... Can DNA be parallel? What would happen if it was parallel? could DNA still replicate right?
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62 views

Known ways to modify the genetic structure of the 13 loci used in CODIS

After reading the answer to Does our DNA change during our lives?, I was wondering if and how it would be possible to change the structure of the 13 loci that are used in the CODIS database, in such a ...
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How semi-synthetic cell with artificial DNA works

I know that by now this is old new but I heard that a cell that used a synthetic pair of nucleotides, called X and Y, have been made. My question was, how did the cell understand the X and Y ...
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21 views

Inter-codon mutations statistical analysis

I am looking for a statistical approach to inter-codon mutations. For example a 64*64 (64*63 actually) table, that contain the possibility of mutation from one codon to another codon (CCA to CAA or ...
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Does a man contain all the genes needed to make a woman?

This question is brought on by a Sci Fi novel I am thinking about writing. The plot device involves a colonist in charge of building a population on a new planet who loses his supply of embryos and so ...
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78 views

Why do some cells like myofibrils have multiple nuclei?

I see that myofibrils (muscle cells) contain not one, but multiple nuclei. Why is this so? Do all the nuclei participate in cell division?
7
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Double stranded nucleic acids are more 'durable' than single stranded nucleic acids?

I'm struggling with a question I've been asked. "Why is double stranded genetic material more 'durable' than single stranded one?" I know that double stranded genetic material is more stable due to ...
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1answer
109 views

Can cfDNA testing distinguish results in the case of twins?

A fetus can now be screened for some of the more common genetic diseases and its sex determined from just a whole blood sample from the pregnant mother. Fetal DNA is abundant enough in the systemic ...
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96 views

How fallible are DNA paternity tests?

Is it possible to get either a false positive or a false negative from a DNA paternity test and what would be the likely mechanisms behind this? For example, is it possible that a father's DNA could ...
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34 views

Superpatients for Cancer resistance

I was reading an article on MIT Technology review about superpatients for low cholesterol that got me thinking whether such patients exist for cancer. The article is ...
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How is DNA Read

Little odd question here. I was told that DNA was read in groups of three. Assuming this, my question is: Which way would better describe how the DNA is read. (123)456789 to 123(456)789 to ...
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56 views

Will gene mutations give rise to a protein that is shorter than the full length protein?

What is the relationship between deletion or insertion of nucleotide in the gene sequence and the protein's length that is coded out from the mutated gene?
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58 views

G>T transversion VS. T>G transversion?

So I'm reading about how mutations in DNA can be caused by oxidative damage. An example of a product of oxidative damage is given: 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine My textbook says that this product ...
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902 views

Why do the major and minor groove exist in DNA?

So I know that the major/minor groove arise from the offset pairing of the two strands in the helix. All my textbook tells me is that "pitch causes the off-set pairing of DNA and this gives rise to ...
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Why deoxyribose for DNA and ribose for RNA?

Why is DNA made out of deoxyribose and RNA made of ribose? Why can't they both use ribose or deoxyribose? I think that the deoxyribose gives an advantage in storing genes, the job of DNA and ribose is ...
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194 views

Why does DNA have its name?

Why is DNA called deoxyribonucleic acid and not something else? I get the nucleic acid part (because that's what DNA is made of) but what about the deoxyribo- part, especially the ribo- part. Maybe ...
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35 views

PCR cycle problem [closed]

IF I began a PCR cycle with 5 copies of a particular DNA section, and copied the section by PCR, for 6 cycles, how many copies of the DNA (include the originals) would I have by the end of these ...
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606 views

What makes DNA sticky-ends sticky?

When restriction enzymes jaggedly cut double stranded DNA it results in so called sticky ends. What is the substance that makes the DNA sticky?
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75 views

Low copy numbers of plasmids

I have a plasmid with the P15A origin which apparently has a low copy number (see here). This would explain why my purification yeilds for subsequent digestion are low (gel shows the plasmid after ...
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93 views

Are there any similarities in the DNA of a humans and animals? [closed]

As the title says, i've been wondering if there are any similarities between the DNA of humans and the DNA of animals? Like, maybe monkeys are more similiar in their DNA to humans, than dogs are (to ...
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985 views

Why does A pair with T and G with C?

DNA is made up of pairs on AT and GC base pairs. I know that A only pairs with T and G only with C. Does this apply just to humans, or are there animals where T will pair with G? Also, surely there ...
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419 views

Calculating number of amino acids in mRNA

Assuming there were 20 different amino acids and less than 40 types of different tRNAs found in this alien organism. How many amino acids would be found in the translational product of a ...
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45 views

Is the nuclear envelope present in G1 of interphase?

Is the nuclear envelope present in G1 of interphase of eukaryotic cell? If so how does a method like Calcium mediated transfection get DNA past the nuclear envelope?
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Importance of Double Helix DNA Structure

Gene expression involves transcribing only one strand of DNA molecule. So i was wondering what are some biological advantages of the double stranded DNA?
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142 views

Why is the threshold between human embryo and human fetus defined as 8 weeks after fertilization?

Why is the threshold between human embryo and human fetus defined as 8 weeks after fertilization? What's happening on the 8th week? Note: definition of embryo based on Wikipedia's current ...
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80 views

Has DNA communication/interaction at a distance been empirically demonstrated?

I recently had a discussion with a statistician in my school about memory. Among other things, he told me that it has been experimentally demonstrated that when one extracts DNA from any organism and ...
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Nucleosome wrapping direction

Does anyone know which direction the nucleosomes are wrapped? I wonder: Relative to the B-DNA double helix twist direction (right-hand) Relative to the neighbor nucleosomes. Do they alternate to ...
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Redundancy of the genetic code

One particular codon codes only for one amino acid, but an amino acid can be coded for by several different codons. Now according to the genetic code, the codon UUU ...
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103 views

What kind of technology is required for plant seed DNA printing? [closed]

I'm a programmer so I have little knowledge in the field of biology. However I have an interest in plants, GMOs and DNA (in terms of programming). So, I want to know what kind of technology is ...
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400 views

How does non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) work?

I was reading about non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in my molecular biology of the gene textbook but the explanation provided in the text was rather vague to me, and I was not able to understand it ...
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How does high-fidelity of DNA replication depend on the formation of hydrogen bonds?

Replication has an error rate of less than 1 in 100 million. DNA polymerase forms H-bond with the H-bond acceptor atoms in the minor groove. <-- enhance fidelity here? Binding of the triphosphate ...
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Does DNA replication in 5' to 3' (leading strand) need RNA primase?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27TxKoFU2Nw In the above video it shows that during DNA replication, the lagging strand require RNA primase to add 3' -OH group for further addition of nucleotides. ...
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Gibson assembly - primer design with A and T rich regions

I have question about Gibson assembly. I have done it several times and it always worked okay for us, but now I want to assemble together a fragment which has sequence like this: ...
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Simplest Biological Organism? [duplicate]

What is the simplest biological organism from which a DNA sample has been or could be obtained? Could the resulting DNA be processed and examined in such a way that the resulting information would ...
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If DNA is the input, what is the output? [closed]

How does cells use the DNA inside them? I am looking on DNA as a strip of tape of Turing machine, but with machines its easy. I can read the tape and calculate the behavior of that machine. With cells ...
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174 views

Why do our epiphyseal plates close up in our late teens or early twenties?

What causes our epiphyseal plates close up in our late teens or early twenties? I realize that one's genetics plays the main role in this. I assume there is a gene that controls the epiphyseal plates ...
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71 views

Are the DNA codon mappings arbitrary?

I am a Biology novice so I apologize in advance if I state anything incorrectly.... My question is, are the DNA codon mappings arbitrary? I understand that the DNA code is made up of codons which ...
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programmatic fast search of 100-1000 short reads to a public server and obtain list of nearby genes

What are the options for programmatic fast searching of 100-1000 short reads to a public server and obtain list of nearby genes where the reads map? Input: ~100-1000 short reads Output: GFF list of ...
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1answer
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How to identify genes?

You and me are different at DNA level. My eye color gene is different from yours. So, my DNA is different from yours. How can a scientist identify a certain gene in a chromosome (and its function) if ...
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5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydroxyuracil - how they arise in DNA?

5,6-dihydrouracil can be formed from cytosine after exposure of DNA to ionizing radiation under anoxic conditions [Ref]. What are other ways by which 5,6-dihydrouracil is formed in DNA? What about ...
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81 views

What percentage of DNA do people share?

If you picked two people in the world at random, sequenced each of their entire genome, and compared their DNA, what would the expected percentage match be?
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How is the rate of transcription influenced by temperature?

How is the rate of transcription influenced by temperature? More precisely, I am looking for an article who quantitatively measured the rate of transcription of an "average gene" and show how this ...
2
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Transcription rate expressed in microarray per hour

This article gives measurement of transcription rate and the unit they're using is microarray per hour. For example, at 27°C the average expression of their genes is 236.1 microarray per hour (page ...
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where to find the relative frequency distribution of synonymous codons

Most amino acids can be encoded by more than one codon. For example, Serine can be encoded by any one of ...
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77 views

Chromatids in metaphase?

Please see the following picture: In my book, the author claims that these chromosomes are in metaphase (a metaphase stopped by cholchicin). I don't understand why they don't have two ...
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89 views

Has it been confirmed yet that the DNA found in dinosaurs was really DNA?

I hear different sources claiming different things, bbc said they did, wikipedia says it hasn't which is it?
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265 views

What causes skewed ladder bands on an agarose gel?

I frequently ran into an issue where the bands of my ladder become skewed. What causes this? Here's an example: 0.7% agarose gel, 100V, 60 minutes. Same problem occurs with 1%. I loaded 10 ul of a 20 ...
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Is there a biological mechanism for evolution encoded into our DNA?

Throughout high school, I remember learning about Darwin's theory of evolution as if it were near-fact. But something always seemed wrong about the ideas presented. Survival of the fittest Random ...
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How do nicks in the DNA strand affect the success of Long Range PCR?

Long Range PCR using NEB Master Mix - Hot Start Taq was working fine for me (amplicon sizes of ~10kb) but stopped working all of a sudden. Is it possible that many freeze-thaw cycles on the DNA ...