Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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Codon alignment via Python? [closed]

I have pairs of coding DNA sequences which I wish to perform pairwise codon alignments via Python, I have "half completed" the process. So far.. I retrive pairs of orthologous DNA sequences from ...
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How much DNA of mitochondrial origin is incorporated in main cell's DNA?

And especially three points : in which chromosomes is it located (especially for the human case) ? how do we know about it ? does the proportion and composition vary a lot from one eukaryot to ...
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Transcription takes place from the 5’ to the 3’ end of the m-RNA. Why?

Only one side of the DNA ladder is copied (the sense side). The sense side starts with a 3’ end. This means the corresponding mRNA will have to assemble starting from the 5’ end. This is my initial ...
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232 views

DNA degradation rate

Usually DNA sample manipulation is realized with an ice box at hand in order to avoid degradation, and also its storage is set at -20ºC. Nevertheless, DNA has been obtained from really ancient samples ...
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182 views

Is there a PSI-BLAST for nucleotide sequences?

I understand that one can translate a nucleotide sequence and run PSI-BLAST on the protein (proteins if you take the 6 reading frames), but I'm looking for distant homology for bacterial small RNAs ...
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113 views

Would it be correct to state that any biological difference between the sexes has to be found in the Y chromosome?

If the reason Why Men Don't Listen and Women Can't Read Maps is genetic, then one of the genes in the Y chromosome is to blame and in theory could be identified. Correct or incorrect?
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How easy is it to carry out de novo sequence assembly?

Today a colleague of mine asked the following question: " Assuming I need to build from 0, a chromosome of a fish, with short reads but no other reference whatsoever [de novo assembly]: ...
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123 views

What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?

What is the most genetically simple organism (except viruses) on this planet? By simple I mean the least number of genes.
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49 views

Clarification of the procedures to amplify cDNA needed

The typical procedure to obtain cDNA from genomic extracted DNA is the following: RNA is extracted from desired tissue, RNA/DNA hybrid is obtained by virtue of reverse transcriptase RNA dependent DNA ...
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33 views

Mitotic crossover happens in G1?

I was reading this article in wikipedia and came across this : It has been suggested that recombination takes place during G1, when the DNA is in its 2-strand phase, and replicated during DNA ...
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217 views

How much does the Hayflick limit/telomere length vary across taxa and within humans?

Since they seem to be quite connected, I'm curious if anyone knows of research comparing the Hayflick limit (and presumably by extension telomere length) between different taxa. I've heard the ...
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Altering the human genome

I recently had a conversation with a rather unusual gentleman who was, let's say, more than a little partial to conspiracy theories. He has this idea that governments are lowering "nanowires" from ...
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102 views

Should the length of the electrodes in the electrophoresis chamber be proportional to chamber's size?

I am trying to build a small horizontal electrophoresis chamber from scratch. I want to use it for comet assay and I will be using only 1 slide, so it's going to be about 3cm wide, 10cm long and 4cm ...
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what are hyperbranched amplicons in DNA sequencing?

I am reading an article about single-cell sequencing: http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nbt.2720.html And came across the concept of "hyperbranched amplicons". I googled for it but ...
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Basic Amino Acid Residue Binding Mechanism to DNA

I understand that many protein DNA binding domains bind to DNA via basic residues such as Arginine and Lysine. But what is the mechanism used to bind to DNA and where on the DNA would these residues ...
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4answers
158 views

How can I produce milligram quantities of an isotope-labeled DNA oligomer?

I'd like to produce a specific DNA sequence on a milligram-scale and 13C15N-label it. The sequence is around 35 nucleotides long, so chemical synthesis is out due to the exorbitant costs. I'm also ...
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37 views

3' or 5' DNA capping protein

Does anyone know of a protein/molecule that can be attached to one end of the DNAs temporarily ? eg. i would like to only to allow one strand of DNA be ligated to another DNA molecule to either it's ...
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493 views

What is the difference between SNP and STR?

I thought that these were just different format of the same data. But it seems there isn't a way to convert SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data to STR (short tandem repeat) data. Am I right? ...
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181 views

Can two denatured DNA strands reassociate?

What matter if I increase the temperature to 95°C. So double-strand DNA denatured into two ssDNA, and then I decrease the temperature to room temperature. Are they able to reassociate after ...
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63 views

Why use DNA polymerase in making cDNA?

RT is capable of synthesizing a complementary dna strand ( as in HIV life cycle.) Then why is DNA pol used when cDNA (synthesizing the second strand of it ) has to be synthesized from mRNA ( For eg.to ...
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107 views

Stability of helical strands of DNA?

The DNA molecules contain phosphate groups involved in $3'\rightarrow 5'$phosphodiester linkages. These groups, in the bonded state with deoxyribose, contain 1 negative charges ($\ce{3'-PO4^{-}-5'}$). ...
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Difference between CDS and cDNA

What is the difference between Coding Sequences (CDS) and cDNA? Are Coding sequences the sequences that is transcribed to mRNA and cDNA in contrast DNA obtained by reverse polymerization of matured ...
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163 views

How to learn molecular biology through pubmed research articles?

Instead of using a textbook, is there an alternative curriculum, that simply lists a set of pubmed research articles for each topic covered in a typical undergrad molecular biology course? I am ...
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176 views

How much natural genetic variation is there between bacteria of the same species?

There are lots of questions about how and why there is genetic variation between organisms of the same species, but I haven't been able to find a numerical value for the expected amount of genetic ...
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430 views

How many gigabytes of DNA are there on earth?

The human genome is about 770 MB, the C. elegans genome is about 100 MB, the yeast S. cerevisiae is about 12 MB. Different other genomes have been sequenced: how many GB of genomic DNA we have now? ...
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145 views

Microarray data and analysis tools

Microarray has various uses, and to analyse the data a main function classification is used. There are many methods used to classify the data but what are the best and most frequently used methods? ...
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142 views

How does electroporation mediated recombination work?

For yeast and other organisms, DNA can be readily taken up into the cell naturally or through membrane disruption. What does applying a voltage to cells do exactly that allows more recombination to ...
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128 views

What is the effective relatedness of inbreeding?

If a human inbreeds with a relative, how distant does the relative have to be before the homozygosity in the child is no higher than if the mate were randomly chosen from the global population?
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Does RNA polymerase move around DNA or does DNA rotate benath the polymerase?

I'm thinking of the human genome specfically, but more general answers are welcome. As RNA polymerase moves along the DNA helix it follows a single strand. The two DNA strands are unwound locally ...
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76 views

Do mitochondrial DNA have repair enzymes?

Mitochondria are considered endosymbionts originated from a prokaryote. So, do they have a DNA repair mechanism ?
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41 views

Reassociation of DNA

What is the order in which this DNA samples would would reassociate ? e.coli DNA plasmid DNA viral DNA satellite DNA DNA-RNA hybrid This is a homework question and I have not been given any ...
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418 views

Why re-label the strand ends in 3' DNA labelling?

I have a problem with a molecular biology question; I don’t understand how DNA 3’ labelling works. I took a diagram from my lesson and tried to understand with it; this is what I understood. If I’m ...
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100 views

There are linear and rotary molecular motors in the cells. Do any of them have a fixed or stable frequency or speed?

Are there any linear, rotary or oscillatory molecular motors in the cells which can have fixed frequeny and which can be used as a reference for elapsed time timer? This question is with relevence to ...
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90 views

What to do with a DNA sequencer? [closed]

My school is very fortunate to have a DNA sequencer, and I want to find an opportunity to learn how to use it. I'm currently taking AP Biology this year, and I hope to do an independent study in ...
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Do apes and humans share 99% of DNA or 99% of genes? What is the difference?

I made an answer on the Scifi.SE that can be read here. It is about how the characters in the story Jurassic Park might have gotten DNA for all the species shown. In my answer, I said this: Apes ...
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31 views

Genotoxic agent and their metabolic pathway

What are the mechanics (set of biochemical reactions) allowing a given genotoxic agent to modify the mutation rate at a given spot? to induce only a given type of mutation (from Gs to Cs for ...
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596 views

Difference between viral and human genetic material

I have heard that there is a difference between viral and human genetic material. What is that difference? If I take my cells and take DNA out of them and insert only a small part of it having a ...
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What conditions should I use for Gel Red staining?

What are the optimal staining conditions when using Gel Red? So far, since we have started using it, the gels ran in our lab have been of very poor quality. The bands are very blurred and often ...
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170 views

Basic text/notes on DNA structure (for non-biologists)

I am a mathematics grad student researching knot theory, and I've recently discovered that there is a connection between knot theory and DNA structure (if I understand correctly, when DNA strands ...
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873 views

What is the purpose of Y-shaped adapters in Illumina sequencing?

Y adapters different sequences to be annealed to the 5' and 3' ends of each molecule in a library. The arms of the Y are unique, and the middle part, connected to the DNA fragment, is complementary. ...
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73 views

Why can't we observe haplotypes directly?

I am completely a noob to biology and DNAs, but recently I am looking into EM-algorithm used in the case of re-constructing haplotypes from genotype data. I am just wondering what exactly in the ...
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185 views

Which organisms have introns?

From Wikipedia: For example, introns are extremely common within the nuclear genome of higher vertebrates (e.g. humans and mice), where protein-coding genes almost always contain multiple introns, ...
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261 views

Why are urban birds still scared of humans?

I understand that animals are naturally scared of humans because we basically slaughtered every living thing we found in our way for millennia. How long does it take for them to genetically 'forget' ...
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96 views

Superposing DNA

I have a series of protein models with DNA docked. I now want to superpose the DNA on a reference DNA molecule and extract the translational distance applied and the rotation angle used. I can ...
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108 views

Do spouses begin to share genes over time?

I apologize if this hypothesis sounds strange by I was wondering if any research had been done on a phenomenon which I've seen and have corroborated with many other - the idea that over time spouses ...
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680 views

What happens when cells in your body run out of telomeres?

In my biology book I read about an experiment where the genes encoding telomerase were 'knocked out', but they could still live a normal life and no adverse effects were noticed until the 6th ...
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How do I figure out which of the valleys I came from?

I had my DNA tested by 23andme.com. They give me a very long string for my DNA. How do I determine which of the three Ethiopian valleys I descended from? I'm of European descent. ...
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How correlated are proximally related CpG sites in human DNA?

Cytosine residues in DNA that can be methylated (i.e. CpG sites) are likely to be in the same methylation state if they are geographically (proximally) close together. I can only find one paper that ...
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70 views

Complementarity of cDNA

Strictly speaking, what is the definition of cDNA? This confuses me, since usually it is said to refer to DNA that is complementary to mRNA. Is this correct? Is it restricted to mature mRNA? I ...
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640 views

How long is DNA stable in a freezer?

Inspired by the post about extracting pet DNA, how long would genomic DNA be stable for in a -20°C freezer? It is common practice to store DNA (double-stranded, plasmid) in a -20°C freezer in ...