Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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Conjugated deoxyribonucleotides

I'm currently learning about using PCR techniques to make fluorescently labelled DNA probes, and the textbook mentions "conjugated deoxyribonucleotides" Can someone explain what these are? Nothing ...
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Why do some bacteria have an asymmetric replication?

Our teacher said that Bacillus subtilis has an asymmetrical replication fork. I know that this happens only in some strain of the bacteria . She asked us to find an explication for this mechanism , ...
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DNA replication: in which direction does the DNA polymerase 3 work?

In a couple of sites I have seen, it states that it reads in 3' to 5' direction (upstream) though the daughter strand is made in the 5'-3' direction. How does that work?
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Anomalous base pairing of nucleotide tautomers

What tautomers base pair with what bases? I know that adenine pairs with thymine and guanine pairs with cytosine normally. My question is what does the imino form of adenine base pair with? Regular ...
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64 views

Absorbed dose from a CT scan with relation to radiation accidents

I read somewhere that the average CTDIvol in CT scans at hospitals is ~40 mGy. This translates to the 'radiation intensity' at the center of the person, and can also be roughly interpreted as an ...
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107 views

Horizontal gene transfer from humans

It is known that some viruses embed themselves in the human genome. Is there a mechanism by which human genes can be transferred to other animals or plants by means of viruses shuttling them from ...
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Components of DNA repair and DDR

Many of the molecules involved in DNA repair, specifically Homologous Recombination, do not have clear differentiation from DNA Damage Response Pathway. What is the best journal article that makes ...
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40 views

Are there any arguments against the Onion Test

Are there are any sound arguments (that are simply explained) against the Onion test (http://www.genomicron.evolverzone.com/2007/04/onion-test/)? Which in turn could contribute to the argument that ...
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What is the biological significance of finding palindromes in DNA sequence?

I found a function called palindromes in Matlab that finds palindromes from DNA sequence. Now what is the biological intention behind incorporating this function? What the biological significance of ...
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56 views

tandem repeat sequence; causes of contraction and/or expansion question

Question: Which of the following events, occurring within a tandem repeat sequence, will cause an expansion or contraction of the array? A) Endoduplication B) homologous recombination C) ...
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83 views

How does Cas9 interact with CRISPR?

I read that Cas9 protein along with guided RNA binds at a specific DNA fragment of foreign organism integrated in a host organism DNA. To make the host immune to virus infection Cas9 along with gRNA ...
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recombination between DNA segments question

In the diagram shown above, segments A and C are copies of a repeated DNA sequence, flanking a unique stretch shown as B. A and C are in an inverted orientation relative to each other, as indicated ...
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Does DNA influence death (e.g. by cell aging)

I know that we age because of errors in the cell replication process and these errors eventually leads to death. If we exclude environmental factors, are there any other factors that can cause these ...
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How distantly related are eusocial insects? Aren't members of a species much more related than 1/4, 1/2, or 3/4? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How many genes do we share with our mother? I went to a lecture that talked about the behavior of social insects in terms of their relatedness of genes. For instance, ...
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65 views

Is there any possible way to take a DNA test without using blood in humans?

Is there any possible way to take a DNA test without the need to draw blood in humans? Any information will be useful for me.
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44 views

Resolution of gel electrophoresis

My professor mentioned the resolution of the gel in gel electrophoresis. He stated that agarose has large pores and thus low resolution whereas polyacrylamide has the opposite. I don't understand ...
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How does one predict the methylation pattern?

Suppose, we have a double stranded DNA like 5' AGCTAGGAGAGACCAGGTTCC 3' 3' TCGATCCTCTCTGGTCCAAGG 5' Where would the methylated cytosine be? Is there any randomness?
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Reading and Understanding profile bands in DNA Fingerprinting

I have very limited knowledge when it comes to DNA fingerprinting. I know about the technique gel electrophoresis and how everything is carried out. But I don't know how to read the result or ...
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64 views

Can we change one's genome into the genome of somebody else

If I (grown-up individual and not just an egg after fertilization) wanted your exact genome, would we be able with today's technology to change my genome into yours?
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Since nature highly favors the pyranose forme of Ribose, what explains the fact we find it in the form of furanose in DNA and RNA?

I read in my notes that relative abundance of ribopyranose represents about 80% of all ribose in solution (including the alpha and beta anomeres). I'm curious as to why evolution favored the use of ...
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Why does supercoiled DNA run faster?

The DNA exists in linear and cirular forms. The latter form has interesting feature called Supercoiling. The more number of writhe makes it more supercoiled because of which it gets more compact. ...
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Restriction sites

I would like to know: how many restriction sites does a restriction enzyme use on a DNA molecule? In other words: If a sequence on a plasmid contains the following bases: ATTGCAGTCTG and I want ...
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416 views

Why can't we use plasmids to add genes to ourselves?

Reading these answers I wonder, why doesn't "gene therapy" use self-contained plasmids instead of trying to splice a length into a chromosome?
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Can females be recreated from male DNA?

A chromosomal male is XY and a chromosomal female is XX. Now imagine if, one day, this world has only males - is it possible to "recreate" a female by using two X chromosomes from two different males? ...
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How do two parents, recessive and dominant genes and two complimentary nucleotides end up in one DNA? [closed]

In the basic school, I was taught that half of genome is received from father and another half comes from mother in the form of double-helix DNA, whose first helix consists of dominant nucleotide ...
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What happens after the purification step in Hi-C sequencing?

I am a statistician reading an article on Hi-C, and I am trying to better understand one of the steps in the DNA isolation and sequencing process. Since I'm a statistician, please try to avoid too ...
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139 views

How do eukaryotes terminate transcription? (clarification on Campbell Biology)

I'm having trouble understanding how eukaryotes terminate transcription. Studying Campbell Biology (pg. 342, 10th ed.), I read: In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II transcribes the polyadenylation ...
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Using Q solution with ready made MasterMix

I am exploring the possibility of using Q solution (5x) to get rid of non specific bands in PCR. I mostly use a MasterMix and not separate aliquots of dNTPs, Taq, buffer etc. In principle, adding Q ...
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What are constrained genetic elements?

I am somewhat of a newbie in evolutionary biology currently taking my first steps in bioinformatics. I was reading a paper when I came across the term "constrained genetic elements", referring to ...
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blastn: What substitution matrix is used?

I'm currently working aligning sequences, and I need to compute similarity between pairs of DNA 'words' of a particular length. For amino acids I am able to use the substitution matrices in Biopython ...
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In the future, it is plausible that we can change the physical appearance of a living animal by editing DNA?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/revealed-scientists-edit-dna-to-correct-adult-genes-and-cure-diseases-9273555.html This article explains that scientists managed to change the DNA of adult ...
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160 views

How does NHEJ cause indels?

I was reading up on CRISPR-cas9 and how it works and I am having trouble wrapping my head around how NHEJ to repair the DSB can cause indels to occur. Shouldn't the NHEJ just stick the two strands of ...
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86 views

What DNA has the most info for getting a person's likeness? [closed]

I understand that DNA can come from hair but also from other places. Let's suppose a person gets their DNA mapped by a company (there are some companies claiming to offer analysis of DNA.. e.g. maybe ...
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Are all Y-chromosomes the same?

Since the Y-chromosome can only pass from male to male child, it would seem to pass intact. Thus, a boy's Y-chromosomes would, I guess, be the same as his father's. Going backwards, would not all men ...
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61 views

Is studying complete mitochondrial genome need biological lab work?

The research complete mitochondrial genome study done on species: Juema pig Sus scrofa (Suina: Suidae) from southern Gansu red rainbowfish speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus white char Salvelinus ...
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Need clarification on a sentence regarding vesicle-mediated translocation

I've chanced upon a passage that is not entirely clear to me: In addition to conjugation, transformation and transduction, other less well recognised mechanisms of DNA uptake occur in nature, ...
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Why I obtain larger bands than expected after minipreparation?

guys! I made a "home made" minipreparation to obtain my plasmid+insert (totalizing approximately 6Kb). But, when I run a agarose gel, I saw a unique band with 10Kb. Why?
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What is the fate of micronucleus DNA?

Micronuclei are cellular structures that are formed as a by-product of, usually, defective mitosis. The piece of chromosome in a micronucleus may, or may not contain a centromere and the DNA is ...
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Bioinformatics - DNA binding, sequence-specific protein data

I am a computer scientist and we are working on protein function prediction algorithms. Right now, we would like to examine protein-DNA binding properties computationaly. For this, we would make use ...
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Why does nature use a 4-level system (DNA) to encode information?

First, I am not a biologist, so this question might be naive: All of our information processing and storing is based on 2-level logic, bits with 0 and 1. Now, DNA stores the information in a 4-level ...
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85 views

Nature of Dengue Fever Genetic Material

Once the genetic material for Dengue Fever is inserted into the human DNA, would the Dengue Fever molecular material be in the form of its own isolated DNA fragment or will it be inserted directly ...
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Does the genetic material the sperm carries affect its physical properties

Basically, what I'm asking is, is the actual sperm cell built from the blueprint in the DNA of the man or is it itself also a consequence of the DNA it carries? I'd like to know a few more things ...
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Is it possible to amplify every single piece of DNA through PCR?

Is there a way to perform non-specific PCR amplification for the purpose of amplifying every piece of DNA present?
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Complexity in creating transgenic animals (e.g., mice)

Many papers I have seen describing transgenic rodent models (and presumably applicable to other model organisms) involve the knock-in, or modification to, a single gene, possibly two genes. With ...
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Solubility of DNA in water

This would seem to be an easy to answer question, but I was unable to find an answer (in g/L) for generic double-stranded DNA or plasmid neither on Google nor on BioNumbers. I would expect the ...
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Are genes on the 5' to 3' strand only?

I confused myself during studying, and wanted to confirm something. Since transcription via RNA polymerases only takes place in the 5'to 3' direction, that would mean that that 5' to 3' strand is the ...
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Organ donation compatibility based on DNA

As far as I know, multiple tests are made before organ transplant to determine matching. Would it be possible to do the matching based on the DNA of the patients, rather than the actual serum ...
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There are 6 classifications of CFTR mutations. Is a causal relationship to the sweat test known?

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene for the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The CFTR mutations are classified in 6 classes. The sweat test is ...
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Diffuse DAPI staining after time in tissue

My student is using ProLong Gold with DAPI (premixed) on sheep uterine tissue. We have used this reagent for some time with great results. Now, when she finishes her immunofluorescence protocol, ...
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Are genes uniformly dispersed throughout the genome?

I think that telomeres and centromeres are regions with a very low gene content (= regions that contain few genes). To the exception of telomeres and centromeres, are genes uniformly distributed ...