Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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Telomerase in tetrahymena

In this amazing video, at 26:03 we see this image We now know that the telomerase contains a sequence complementary to the telomere sequence and so is able to do what it is capable of doing in this ...
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322 views

How much does the Hayflick limit/telomere length vary across taxa and within humans?

Since they seem to be quite connected, I'm curious if anyone knows of research comparing the Hayflick limit (and presumably by extension telomere length) between different taxa. I've heard the ...
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500 views

Why Only DNA can Contain Hereditary Material?

Well I'm well aware that it is proven that DNA contains genetic material via transformation and Hershey-Chase Experiment of T2 bacteriophage. Still I was wondering what is the reason only DNA ...
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92 views

What triggers DNA to produce proteins?

What is the trigger for DNA to produce proteins or RNA? I have found enough material to study the inner workings of the cell and DNA; but, I can't find an explanation of the mechanics the cell uses ...
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Evolutionarily speaking, why do humans have 46 chromosomes

In humans, each cell normally contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. Monkeys, chimpanzees, and Apes have 24 pairs (twenty-four pairs), for a total of 48. What caused humans to have 46? ...
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What does 5' and 3' mean in DNA and RNA strands?

What are 5' and 3' in DNA and RNA strands? Please clarify with some images and please use simple English.
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871 views

Difference between mice and rats

What is the actual biological difference between mice and rats? Are they actually the same thing with two different names depending on appearance (are they all mice for instance and we call the larger ...
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134 views

High sequence similarity but start codon isn't methionine

I have noticed in a particular genome sequence of a prokaryote that various regions in a sequence share similarity which is high(>80%) with known proteins. However, the start is not a methionine. Is ...
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130 views

More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule? [closed]

A question that appeared on my last exam was : Which of the following has greater entropy A) An atom B) A macromolecule The question doesn't specify anything else(i.e. type/size of atom or ...
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558 views

Is there variation of AT/CG ratio along species?

Chargaff's rules say that the number of Adenine of the number of Thymine in a genome are equal (nA=nT) and similarly nC=nG. This makes obvious sense knowing that C binds to G and A to T. But what ...
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Separating DNA Fragments by Gel Electrophoresis. Are all the strands for one size the same?

My apologies if my question is too basic, and please point me to a more appropriate forum. I am reading the textbook "Essential Cell Biology" by Alberts et al, and am consulting other sources as ...
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115 views

What risk to DNA does long-term exposure to low-dose radiation pose?

A new study from MIT scientists suggests that long-term exposure to low-radiation poses no risk of DNA damage for mice (it is also important to note that mice are unusually susceptible to cancer). So ...
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89 views

How to measure quality and quantity of DNA?

I would like to mesure DNA. I quantify the concentration with Qubit fluorometer, but I would like to know also quality of DNA. I try BioAnalyzer (Agilent),but without success. Bioanalyzer measure DNA ...
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189 views

How to learn molecular biology through pubmed research articles?

Instead of using a textbook, is there an alternative curriculum, that simply lists a set of pubmed research articles for each topic covered in a typical undergrad molecular biology course? I am ...
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107 views

Pros/cons: linear vs. circular DNA [duplicate]

Why did Eukaryotes evolve to have linear DNA and not circular like Prokaryotes? What are the pros and/or cons?
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367 views

How much DNA of Albert Einstein is recoverable?

Since there seem to be five biological descendants of Albert Einstein, and the original chromosomes of him distributed among them ... Is it possible to recover enough DNA of an individual from his ...
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78 views

dsDNA translation

Since DNA is double stranded and each strand is complementary to the other, the codons on each strand will come out to be different after transcription(depending on the reading frame). Does this mean ...
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135 views

What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?

What is the most genetically simple organism (except viruses) on this planet? By simple I mean the least number of genes.
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2k views

What is DNA binding domain? It is not clear what the domain means

I am confused about the term DNA binding domain. Does it mean that there are some parts of the DNA that tends to coil up? Does it happen because some proteins tend to stick around that area? Also it ...
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Self pairing in DNA

I know that ssRNA molecule can fold over itself (e.g. in t-RNA). Can DNA do the same? Is there any example of this in nature? Why is this phenomenon more common in RNA than in DNA?
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What is biological dark matter?

I recently stumbled upon the Biological Dark Matter wiki page. Its pretty light on details, but it appears to be genetic material found in humans that doesn't fall into currently classifications. ...
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Detecting cancer or a genetic predisposition based on DNA sequencing

I am not by any means a biologist - so go easy. What would be a method for determining whether or not a patient has cancer based only on a genomic sequence? Update Thanks for the help in revising ...
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137 views

Question about Autosomal Recessive Alleles

I had a homework question that I could not figure out. It states: A woman has cystic fibrosis in her family and did not want to have a child that suffered from the disease. She and her spouse ...
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278 views

Can replication occur if DNA is methylated?

Can a methylated strand of DNA be replicated without removing methylation? Does it make any difference if the strand is methylated or not (during replication)?
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How does the DNA know which chain has error in repairing?

As we know, the DNA has more stability than RNA, if one chain has broken or accidentally distorted, it can be repaired by the other one. Suppose there is a segment AGTC, its peer is GACT. Now its ...
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How are atoms in benzopyridines and benzopurines numbered?

I am well-aware of the numbering system used for the traditional bases, as seen below. My question is how are the atoms in the size-expanded bases seen in xDNA and xRNA numbered?
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How fallible are DNA paternity tests?

Is it possible to get either a false positive or a false negative from a DNA paternity test and what would be the likely mechanisms behind this? For example, is it possible that a father's DNA could ...
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The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase

In this piece about giant viruses and the origin of life, in the context of the move from RNA world to DNA world, virologist Valerian Dolja states: In order to move from RNA to DNA, you need an ...
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Is there a way to measure the amount of bytes that are possible to encode in a DNA molecule?

When I saw a DNA molecule for the first time, it kinda reminded me of a hard drive. It consists of slots and there are some possible combinations for each slot; in the hard drive these possible ...
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94 views

How would you affect bulk DNA gene therapy for a human?

Let's imagine that we understood DNA programming and our genome very well and realized that there were some significant flaws (we die, we need sleep, etc.) And let's imagine that we understand how to ...
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60 views

Can we attack viruses by attaching proteins and such to their shells?

Haven't looked into this to very long, but an initial search didn't return anything. HIV uses certain co-receptors to enter our cells. Could we flood the blood stream with specially designed ...
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54 views

How can I re-format my DNA motifs' position weight matrices?

I am working with a set of DNA motifs that are predicted as potential regulatory motifs (e.g. transcription factor binding sites). The motifs belong to several species, and I wanted to cluster these ...
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Difference between CDS and cDNA

What is the difference between Coding Sequences (CDS) and cDNA? Are Coding sequences the sequences that is transcribed to mRNA and cDNA in contrast DNA obtained by reverse polymerization of matured ...
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946 views

What happens when cells in your body run out of telomeres?

In my biology book I read about an experiment where the genes encoding telomerase were 'knocked out', but they could still live a normal life and no adverse effects were noticed until the 6th ...
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127 views

How distantly related are eusocial insects? Aren't members of a species much more related than 1/4, 1/2, or 3/4? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How many genes do we share with our mother? I went to a lecture that talked about the behavior of social insects in terms of their relatedness of genes. For instance, ...
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How do nicks in the DNA strand affect the success of Long Range PCR?

Long Range PCR using NEB Master Mix - Hot Start Taq was working fine for me (amplicon sizes of ~10kb) but stopped working all of a sudden. Is it possible that many freeze-thaw cycles on the DNA ...
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48 views

How do mosquitoes maintain telomere length?

While the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms maintain their chromosome ends (telomeres) via telomerase, an enzyme system that generates short, tandem repeats on the ends of chromosomes, other ...
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37 views

What is the genetic distance where linkage can be ignored?

I heard several times that two SNPs, that have at least 1'000 nucleotides between them, can be seen as 'unlinked' due to frequent recombination events. I also once saw a paper showing a graph "degree ...
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374 views

How do multiple replication forks function without 'colliding', and what is the benefit of this method?

I'm currently reading a little about DNA replication, and have come accross the following statement; Replication starts from a fixed point and is bi-directional ... In Eukaryotes, there are ...
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What percentage of DNA do people share?

If you picked two people in the world at random, sequenced each of their entire genome, and compared their DNA, what would the expected percentage match be?
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225 views

How does GC-content evolve?

Background GC-content refers to the frequency of base pairs that are either C or G in the genome, or in other words the number of GC base pairs divided by the addition of the number of GC base pairs ...
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126 views

Real-time PCR delay in Cq due to insertion SNP in primer

I am collecting evidence, even anecdotal, how does single nucleotide deletion or insertion in primer region affect the outcome of real-time PCR. I am most interested in how much there is a delay in ...
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Transposons and the net amount of DNA

The retrotransposons and certain DNA-transposons, are "jumping" sequences which may be incorporated elsewhere in the genomic DNA of an organism, through varying mechanisms. This insertion is almost ...
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107 views

Superposing DNA

I have a series of protein models with DNA docked. I now want to superpose the DNA on a reference DNA molecule and extract the translational distance applied and the rotation angle used. I can ...
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What is the purpose of Y-shaped adapters in Illumina sequencing?

Y adapters different sequences to be annealed to the 5' and 3' ends of each molecule in a library. The arms of the Y are unique, and the middle part, connected to the DNA fragment, is complementary. ...
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546 views

Why re-label the strand ends in 3' DNA labelling?

I have a problem with a molecular biology question; I don’t understand how DNA 3’ labelling works. I took a diagram from my lesson and tried to understand with it; this is what I understood. If I’m ...
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mutant down but not out

I am interested in a gene which is null lethal but I need to temporary induce diminished capacity. If a cell is homozygous is it possible to induce heterozygous phenotypes or a partial knockout from ...
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213 views

What is the DNA/protein charge ratio?

To study DNA-protein interaction, I want to do a DNA retardation test by mixing the protein with DNA and afterwarts loading it on an agarose gel to see if the DNA migrates slower. I've found some ...
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“Enhancers” of enhancers?

I am looking for examples (if any) of genomic regions which regulates the activity of enhancers, either augmenting or reducing it. Essentially some kind of enhancers (or repressors) of enhancers to ...
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Gibson assembly - primer design with A and T rich regions

I have question about Gibson assembly. I have done it several times and it always worked okay for us, but now I want to assemble together a fragment which has sequence like this: ...