Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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How fallible are DNA paternity tests?

Is it possible to get either a false positive or a false negative from a DNA paternity test and what would be the likely mechanisms behind this? For example, is it possible that a father's DNA could ...
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169 views

The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase

In this piece about giant viruses and the origin of life, in the context of the move from RNA world to DNA world, virologist Valerian Dolja states: In order to move from RNA to DNA, you need an ...
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103 views

Is there a way to measure the amount of bytes that are possible to encode in a DNA molecule?

When I saw a DNA molecule for the first time, it kinda reminded me of a hard drive. It consists of slots and there are some possible combinations for each slot; in the hard drive these possible ...
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74 views

How do the major and minor grooves in the DNA helix arise?

I understand that they arise due to the pairing of bases of two opposite stands and are sites through which important proteins needed for replication and transcription of DNA interact. But I don't get ...
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78 views

Distinguishing Father from Brother

Given the (non-identical) DNA sequences of two men and the knowledge that the second man is either the father, brother, or son of the first man, is the DNA useful in determining which of these three ...
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61 views

Are genes uniformly dispersed throughout the genome?

I think that telomeres and centromeres are regions with a very low gene content (= regions that contain few genes). To the exception of telomeres and centromeres, are genes uniformly distributed ...
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48 views

Why would mutation rates increase in a tumour?

This article describes a tumour: Swanton found that even the primary tumour was surprisingly varied. He found 128 mutations among the various samples, but only a third of these were common to all ...
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47 views

Gene frequency problem

1/330 of white people in south Africa have a disease called Porphyri. What is the frequency of the gene if it is inherited autosomal recessive? This one I understand. The genotype frequency is $q^2 =...
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157 views

Restriction sites

I would like to know: how many restriction sites does a restriction enzyme use on a DNA molecule? In other words: If a sequence on a plasmid contains the following bases: ATTGCAGTCTG and I want ...
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128 views

How would you affect bulk DNA gene therapy for a human?

Let's imagine that we understood DNA programming and our genome very well and realized that there were some significant flaws (we die, we need sleep, etc.) And let's imagine that we understand how to ...
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68 views

How can I re-format my DNA motifs' position weight matrices?

I am working with a set of DNA motifs that are predicted as potential regulatory motifs (e.g. transcription factor binding sites). The motifs belong to several species, and I wanted to cluster these ...
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2k views

Telomere shortening during replication

It is widely know that each cell cycle during DNA replication some fraction of the telomeres is lost, and this phenomenon is called the end replication problem. Well this is due to the fact that the ...
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3k views

Difference between viral and human genetic material

I have heard that there is a difference between viral and human genetic material. What is that difference? If I take my cells and take DNA out of them and insert only a small part of it having a ...
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2k views

What happens when cells in your body run out of telomeres?

In my biology book I read about an experiment where the genes encoding telomerase were 'knocked out', but they could still live a normal life and no adverse effects were noticed until the 6th ...
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155 views

How distantly related are eusocial insects? Aren't members of a species much more related than 1/4, 1/2, or 3/4? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How many genes do we share with our mother? I went to a lecture that talked about the behavior of social insects in terms of their relatedness of genes. For instance, ...
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60 views

Does DNA polymerase I require a $3^\prime$ end?

DNA polymerase III adds nucleotides in the $5^\prime \rightarrow 3^\prime$ direction because it can only add nucleotides to the $3^\prime$ end of the previous nucleotide. This is why it requires a ...
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56 views

How does the splicing enzyme recognize where to splice the introns?

When the DNA from the nucleus is transcribed to an mRNA, the mRNA is spliced by an enzyme before it goes outside through the nuclear pore. What is the name of this enzyme and how does it recognize ...
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68 views

Why do some bacteria have an asymmetric replication?

Our teacher said that Bacillus subtilis has an asymmetrical replication fork. I know that this happens only in some strain of the bacteria . She asked us to find an explication for this mechanism , ...
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154 views

How do eukaryotes terminate transcription? (clarification on Campbell Biology)

I'm having trouble understanding how eukaryotes terminate transcription. Studying Campbell Biology (pg. 342, 10th ed.), I read: In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II transcribes the polyadenylation ...
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60 views

blastn: What substitution matrix is used?

I'm currently working aligning sequences, and I need to compute similarity between pairs of DNA 'words' of a particular length. For amino acids I am able to use the substitution matrices in Biopython ...
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76 views

Write the haplotypes of the family

I'm doing old exam assignments to prepare for my finals on Monday and I've stumbled on one assignment that I'm not sure how to tackle. A family with 2 children is examined for cataracts using PCR ...
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115 views

How do nicks in the DNA strand affect the success of Long Range PCR?

Long Range PCR using NEB Master Mix - Hot Start Taq was working fine for me (amplicon sizes of ~10kb) but stopped working all of a sudden. Is it possible that many freeze-thaw cycles on the DNA ...
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92 views

How do mosquitoes maintain telomere length?

While the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms maintain their chromosome ends (telomeres) via telomerase, an enzyme system that generates short, tandem repeats on the ends of chromosomes, other ...
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49 views

What is the genetic distance where linkage can be ignored?

I heard several times that two SNPs, that have at least 1'000 nucleotides between them, can be seen as 'unlinked' due to frequent recombination events. I also once saw a paper showing a graph "degree ...
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682 views

Transcription factor binding site located in intron

I have noticed that some TF binding sites are located in the introns of the genes. I am puzzled about whether the TF only binds to DNA in the initiation stage of transcription and will detach during ...
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716 views

How do multiple replication forks function without 'colliding', and what is the benefit of this method?

I'm currently reading a little about DNA replication, and have come accross the following statement; Replication starts from a fixed point and is bi-directional ... In Eukaryotes, there are ...
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148 views

In CRISPR bacteria, how does viral genomes get integrated into the spacers of CRISPR? Also, in its use, where does Cas9 cut the DNA?

I've been out of Biology for about a year polishing my programming skills. I know CRISPR/Cas9 allows targeted 'cutting' of DNA via RNA-guidance. Few questions regarding this. Regarding to its ...
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104 views

DNA length and annealing kinetics

I have a mixture plasmids and undesired short linear fragments that share the same sequences. During denaturation and annealing, I would like the plasmids to 'find each other' before annealing to the ...
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42 views

Forensic genetics- why is mtDNA comparison sometimes better than nDNA comparison?

Why is (in forensic genetics) in some cases more appropriate comparison of nuclear DNA but in some other cases comparison of mitochondrial DNA? Is it because geneticists are sometimes unable to find ...
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94 views

Is it possible to insert DNA without cutting the recognition site with CRISPR/Cas9?

We are looking for a way to insert DNA into a genome, but we would like to do it in a way that the recognition site stay intact to be able to add again DNA at the same location. Do you know if it is ...
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233 views

How do genetic chimeras with different blood types not die?

If a person is a chimera and has two different blood types in his veins, how does he not die? Shouldn't the immune system attack one of the blood types? In 1953 a human chimera was reported in the ...
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126 views

What percentage of DNA do people share?

If you picked two people in the world at random, sequenced each of their entire genome, and compared their DNA, what would the expected percentage match be?
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795 views

How does GC-content evolve?

Background GC-content refers to the frequency of base pairs that are either C or G in the genome, or in other words the number of GC base pairs divided by the addition of the number of GC base pairs ...
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190 views

Real-time PCR delay in Cq due to insertion SNP in primer

I am collecting evidence, even anecdotal, how does single nucleotide deletion or insertion in primer region affect the outcome of real-time PCR. I am most interested in how much there is a delay in ...
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110 views

Transposons and the net amount of DNA

The retrotransposons and certain DNA-transposons, are "jumping" sequences which may be incorporated elsewhere in the genomic DNA of an organism, through varying mechanisms. This insertion is almost ...
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119 views

Superposing DNA

I have a series of protein models with DNA docked. I now want to superpose the DNA on a reference DNA molecule and extract the translational distance applied and the rotation angle used. I can ...
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2k views

What is the purpose of Y-shaped adapters in Illumina sequencing?

Y adapters different sequences to be annealed to the 5' and 3' ends of each molecule in a library. The arms of the Y are unique, and the middle part, connected to the DNA fragment, is complementary. ...
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747 views

Why re-label the strand ends in 3' DNA labelling?

I have a problem with a molecular biology question; I don’t understand how DNA 3’ labelling works. I took a diagram from my lesson and tried to understand with it; this is what I understood. If I’m ...
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49 views

mutant down but not out

I am interested in a gene which is null lethal but I need to temporary induce diminished capacity. If a cell is homozygous is it possible to induce heterozygous phenotypes or a partial knockout from ...
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268 views

What is the DNA/protein charge ratio?

To study DNA-protein interaction, I want to do a DNA retardation test by mixing the protein with DNA and afterwarts loading it on an agarose gel to see if the DNA migrates slower. I've found some ...
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33 views

Scaling down amount of DNA for transfection: what factor to consider?

I am interested in transfecting HEK293 cells with a BAC. One paper suggests using 24 ug of DNA to transfect a 55-cm^2/10 ml culture plate. I am using an assay optimimzed for a 96 well plate so I am ...
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58 views

In vivo delivery of ssDNA

I am looking for a system with which I can deliver (large quantities of) ssDNA in vivo (say in mice). I do not know whether it is of importance but the 5' end of the ssDNA fragments are assumed to be ...
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88 views

How to calculate information content of a DNA sequence

How does one calculate the information content of DNA sequence like ATCGGCT where mutation rate of G's is 10% and the most common mutation product binds with C and A with equal frequency. I know that ...
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37 views

can you tell someone's age from a DNA sample? [duplicate]

So as I understand it telomeres shorten as you age. Working under that assumption.. let's say you were investigating a crime and there was some DNA evidence that had been left behind. Could you ...
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34 views

Minichromosome maintenance protein structure and function

I am having difficulty answering three homework questions which relate directly to Chong et al. (2000). Questions The authors have determined that MtMCM is able to bind both ssDNA and dsDNA (see ...
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Do eukaryotes assimilate DNA that is floating in the extracellular membrane?

Prokayotes, which replicate primarily using binary fission, don't get much genetic diversity. For this reason, they take in any genetic material they encounter, in a gambit to help them better adapt ...
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22 views

What are flagged primers? [closed]

I'm interested in amplifying a sequence for further use with Gibson Assembly. I want to create overhang regions in my DNA fragment so there would be complementarity to the plasmid I'm trying to insert ...
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160 views

How stable is linear DNA transfected in eukaryotic cells?

I would like to know, with references from the literature, what is the half life of a linear dsDNA transfected in a mammalian cells. For example, if I transfect human cells with a PCR product (500-...
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24 views

Inter-codon mutations statistical analysis

I am looking for a statistical approach to inter-codon mutations. For example a 64*64 (64*63 actually) table, that contain the possibility of mutation from one codon to another codon (CCA to CAA or ...
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Gibson assembly - primer design with A and T rich regions

I have question about Gibson assembly. I have done it several times and it always worked okay for us, but now I want to assemble together a fragment which has sequence like this: 5'...