Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
0answers
24 views

Evolution of the Redundancy of the Genetic Code

In short Looking at the genetic code, it appears that most redundancy is on the third letter rather than on the first or the second letter of the codon. Why has it evolved this way? Longer version ...
9
votes
2answers
761 views

Linear and Circular DNA

So school has taught us that eukaryotes have DNA that is linear and inside of a membrane - called the nucleus. And that prokaryotes have circular DNA that is free floating inside of the cell. We ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Why do many DNA solutions contain additional compounds?

DNA solubility data in only water is scarce. A previous question asked for a quantification of DNA solubility in water. It seemed like it would be easily answerable, however isn't quite that simple ...
13
votes
1answer
227 views

Solubility of DNA in water

This would seem to be an easy to answer question, but I was unable to find an answer (in g/L) for generic double-stranded DNA or plasmid neither on Google nor on BioNumbers. I would expect the ...
7
votes
1answer
80 views

What determines the number of chromosomes an organism carries?

This is an extension of this question about What limits chromosomal length?. I am wondering what could be the specific reasons behind the number of chromosomes an organism carries. In other words, ...
-2
votes
3answers
103 views

Immortality Gene? Really? [closed]

I read somewhere in the internet and wondered if human genes have deactivated immortality genes locked somewhere in the DNA strand. Is this statement true? What does it mean for human lifespan?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Which pair of primers should be used to amplify the ORF in PCR? [on hold]

So I want to choose the correct set of pair of primers to amplify the ORF of the gene that corresponds to amino acids in a protein. The start and stop codons are underlined. (I know that these need to ...
10
votes
4answers
848 views

“Same” DNA vs genes

It is often cited that humans share 99% (or 98%) of their DNA with chimpanzees. On the other hand it is stated that siblings share only half of their genes. What (if any) is the difference between ...
5
votes
1answer
348 views

What does it mean to “map the human genome”

I know some elementary chemistry and biology. I also think I know what a gene is (it's a sequence of DNA which encodes a particular protein). I also know that on a chromosome there are sections of DNA ...
11
votes
1answer
2k views

Are human chromosomes connected or separate molecules?

Do the 46 human chromosomes form a single unbroken DNA helix? Or is it rather that a human's genome consists of 46 disconnected helices? If it is the former, does the common numbering scheme for ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the size of the genome across species roughly the same?

Chromosome number differs across species. Is the amount of DNA comparable between organisms, just being split into smaller chunks in those species with more chromosomes? Or do species have different ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Is it possible that the DNA of an individual changes significantly over a period? [duplicate]

Is it possible that the DNA of an individual changes significantly over a period ?
3
votes
1answer
106 views

Restriction sites

I would like to know: how many restriction sites does a restriction enzyme use on a DNA molecule? In other words: If a sequence on a plasmid contains the following bases: ATTGCAGTCTG and I want ...
3
votes
0answers
25 views

How stable is linear DNA transfected in eukaryotic cells?

I would like to know, with references from the literature, what is the half life of a linear dsDNA transfected in a mammalian cells. For example, if I transfect human cells with a PCR product ...
6
votes
0answers
31 views

What is the fate of micronucleus DNA?

Micronuclei are cellular structures that are formed as a by-product of, usually, defective mitosis. The piece of chromosome in a micronucleus may, or may not contain a centromere and the DNA is ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Consequence of Plants as Incomplete Protein Source

Some years ago, in a 1000~ level biology course we learned that the DNA essentially encodes formulas for creating proteins from amino acids. While the human body can synthesize many many amino acids, ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

X-recessive disorder pedigree confusing me

This is a pedigree of a family in which bleeder disease, an x-recessive disease, is present. I am asked which marker, A or B, the disease is linked to. I've asked about this type of problem before: ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Dynamic mutation and huntington's

I read that Huntington's is a disorder caused by dynamic mutations in the DNA, which means that a triplet sequence of DNA changes from generation to generation. Say we have the sequence ATGATGATGATG. ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Where to find gene manipulation video (or photos)

I hope Im not asking a dumb question! Where can i find video of gene manipulation in action under microscope? Like extracting a gene from a cell, fixing gene mutations, putting the gene in a vector, ...
3
votes
0answers
74 views

Do DNA supply houses maintain a watch list for dangerous oligos (Anthrax, Smallpox, etc.)?

The recent work by DeLoache, et al. on a synthetic opiate-precursor production pathway in yeast has generated a lot of scare stories in the media about people homebrewing heroin as easily as they ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Why can't this be 1st meiotic division non-disjunction as well?

The child has gotten 2 "sick" chromosomes from his dad and 1 healthy from his mom, leaving it with trisomy 13. I can see how this can happen in the second meiotic division of the father but I can ...
4
votes
3answers
80 views

What is a genetic marker?

In DNA sequencing and analysis, what is a genetic marker? I've heard that microsatellites are genetic markers? Those are repetitive strands of bases such as GCAGCAGCAGCA etc. Why are they markers and ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Chromosomal translocation notation

A reciprocal translocation is denoted for example: t(4;12)(q32;q24) indicating that q32 on chromosome 4 being swapped with q24 on chromosome 12 if I understand this correctly. My question is: How do ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

X-recessive disorders and genetic markers

Please observe the following pedigree of a family with a x-recessive disease (bleeder disease). The A's are genetic markers so close to the disease gene that recombination is negligible. I ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

Pedigree problem and type of inheritance [closed]

Please observe the following pedigree and come up with a conclusion as to which type of inheritance is most likely Now it should be obvious that it's either autosomal dominant or autosomal ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

Gene frequency problem

1/330 of white people in south Africa have a disease called Porphyri. What is the frequency of the gene if it is inherited autosomal recessive? This one I understand. The genotype frequency is $q^2 ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Walk me through microsatellite markers and PCR

Three polymorph microsatellite markers are used to try and narrow down the location of a disease locus, with the use of PCR with 2 flanks on each side of the actual polymorphic area. The PCR ...
4
votes
1answer
66 views

Bayes theorem for mutations

MEN 2A is a dominant inherited disease caused by a mutation in the RET proto-oncogene. The probability of being sick when you have the mutation of the RET proto-oncogene varies with age and is assumed ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Write the haplotypes of the family

I'm doing old exam assignments to prepare for my finals on Monday and I've stumbled on one assignment that I'm not sure how to tackle. A family with 2 children is examined for cataracts using PCR ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

From a computer science perspective, how is DNA compared for various purposes?

I am very interested in privacy preserving technolgies, such as Microsoft PINQ and would like to see if this is applicable to DNA comparison. Given that I don't have a background in biology, I ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

DNA extraction methods for hair?

TLDR: Can anyone state a extraction and isolation method(s) for genomic DNA for hair that will be used for PCR, in detail is preferable since I am a novice. I tried googling for DNA extraction ...
2
votes
0answers
51 views

CRISPR-Cas Systems

In the context of the bacterial systems (not the gene editing tool), I was wondering what happens to the foreign DNA after the Cas proteins have created a new spacer. It is really not clear to me, ...
5
votes
1answer
113 views

Does crude oil or kerogen contain ancient DNA?

According to wikipedia by the formation of oil there are a lot of organic materials present including DNA. Is it possible that this DNA is conserved somehow for millions of years?
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Can these “Promega Wizard genomic DNA Purification kit” be used for samples not stated directly?

I am not sure if this is a duplicate of my previous question, it is somewhat related, so sorry if I misunderstood. The question is, can i use the above kit for samples like hair, fingernails, etc? ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

The Uniqueness of DNA Paradox

How can everyone have unique iris and fingerprints? After a certain amount of human beings have lived on earth, wouldn't it be possible to exhaust all possible combinations? The same principle ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Is episome a plasmid or a virus?

A plasmid is a small DNA molecule that is physically separate from, and can replicate independently of, chromosomal DNA within a cell. In general, in eukaryotes, episomes are closed circular DNA ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Help reading gene markers

I'm sorry if "gene markers" is not the correct word. An edit could be appreciated but I don't study in an English speaking country unfortunately. Question overview: In a family, there is a genetic, ...
6
votes
1answer
51 views

Why aren't genetic triplets roughly evenly found in DNA?

Sorry, the page I linked to is huge and you'll need to do a text search for "CG" to find the part I'm talking about. I found a graph on this page (http://www.oftenpaper.net/sierpinski.htm) showing ...
7
votes
2answers
218 views

What is the difference between sequence, reads, and contigs of genetic material?

Can someone explain the differences between sequence, reads, and contigs of genetic material such as DNA, if possible with an example? I am new to bioinformatics, and I have not found any conclusive ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

Can DNA test of my grandparent's brother reveal my heritage from that branch of the family?

I'm thinking about doing that DNA test on all my grandparents to know where their genes come from. They are getting very old and I don't want to let the opportunity pass to gather more knowledge about ...
4
votes
0answers
47 views

Horizontal gene transfer from humans

It is known that some viruses embed themselves in the human genome. Is there a mechanism by which human genes can be transferred to other animals or plants by means of viruses shuttling them from ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Why deoxyribose for DNA and ribose for RNA?

Why is DNA made out of deoxyribose and RNA made of ribose? Why can't they both use ribose or deoxyribose? I think that the deoxyribose gives an advantage in storing genes, the job of DNA and ribose is ...
7
votes
1answer
67 views

Double stranded nucleic acids are more 'durable' than single stranded nucleic acids?

I'm struggling with a question I've been asked. "Why is double stranded genetic material more 'durable' than single stranded one?" I know that double stranded genetic material is more stable due to ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

What is the Magnitude of Nonspecific Oligo Binding at Low Temperatures

I am working on designing a protocol to capture genomic sequencing bound oligos (the part in question is identical to primer binding of genomic DNA during a PCR reaction). I'm wondering if anyone can ...
1
vote
3answers
65 views

DIY storing family DNAs' samples for future uses (eg medical)

I have a question I could not get an understandable reply from Google and I am no expert in the matter, so my plead to you is if you could give me practical and relatively easy to follow advice. With ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Mitochondrial D-Loop

I know that the D-loop is a DNA complex in which the strands of double helix DNA molecule are separated for a stretch and held apart by a third strand of DNA. Usually, this third strand has a base ...
38
votes
4answers
2k views

What exactly are computers used for in DNA sequencing?

I've thoroughly read the Wikipedia article on DNA sequencing and can't get one thing. There's some hardcore chemistry involved in the process that somehow splits the DNA and then isolates its parts. ...
4
votes
1answer
42 views

Why doesn't mitochondrial DNA accumulate damage over successive generations?

From what I recall, mitochondrial DNA is very susceptible to damage from oxidative stress because it is a site where free radicals are generated and their DNA isn't packed into chromatin like nucleic ...
5
votes
1answer
94 views

During the process of correcting mutations via gene therapy, is the defective gene removed?

Just recently started learning about gene therapy, many websites explain that the corrected DNA can be added to the genome using a vector and all that. I just don't understand what happens to the ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Does the DNA of a tadpole change after it becomes a frog?

Does the DNA of a tadpole change after it becomes a frog? In other words what changes take place as a tadpole becomes a frog, and does this metamorphosis affect the DNA in any way? I would appreciate ...