Enzymes are globular proteins that catalyse a biochemical reaction, increasing the overall rate by reducing activation energy. Most chemical reactions in a cell need enzymes in order to occur at rates sufficient to sustain life.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
1answer
167 views

sodium chloride and amylase activity

So, I did an experiment on the effect of sodium chloride on amylase. and I found out the higher the concentration, the slower the activity. Therefore, is it valid to make the assumption that when we ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

How will changing the concentration of a Tris buffer affect amylase enzyme activity?

For instance if you increase the amount of Tris but pH still does not change then will the enzyme activity still proceed normally? If it does change the pH will it change enzyme structure and why?
3
votes
0answers
41 views

Adenosine metabolism

Are adenosine or its catabolites increased in inflamed airways? How can I assess this? I am trying to use inhibitors for adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, but ...
3
votes
0answers
35 views

Are there any enzymes synthesised by humans that specifically catalyse the hydrolysis of non-cyclic Imides?

Imides or dicarbonyl amides are an interesting class of compounds that includes the pharmaceuticals thalidomide, aniracetam and a few other drugs. These compounds, however, are cyclic and I'm ...
2
votes
0answers
20 views

Does alpha-amylase from different species have different *optimal* conditions?

Do the optimal conditions for the enzyme isoforms differ between species? Specifically, do the optimal pH and temperature for alpha-amylase differ for that enzyme produced by B. lichiniformis and A. ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

Proteases in the blood

I’m reading on hormones and the book talks about how peptide or amine hormones are easily broken down by proteases present in the blood plasma. This has led me to question the interactions between ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

What's the purpose of Cdk activity having more than one method of becoming inactive?

Cdk becomes partially active once its bound to cyclin and then gets phosphorylated and fully active once a Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) phosphorylates the partially active Cdk. This fully activated Cdk ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Enzyme immobilization: Factors that help or hurt success

Are there any factors to consider that can help / hurt the chance to get a successful immobilized enzyme catalyst? i.e. The relative attractiveness of a live host synthesis vs an immobilized enzyme. ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Is it possible to separate the binding and catalysis of an enzyme in two steps?

Is it possible to do the following: Enzyme E binds to its substrate S without catalysis; Add a controllable stimulus, such as light, adding or removing chemicals; The enzymatic reaction is triggered ...
1
vote
0answers
127 views

How to calculate the LOB, LOD and LOQ of an enzyme assay

I understand how to calculate limit of blank (LOB), limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantitation (LOQ) in the traditional way i.e., average and SD of raw analytical signal of blanks and low ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Invertase calculation?

If I wanted to make $500\mathrm{\mu g}/\mathrm{ml}$ of invertase, from Sigma's Invertase from Baker's yeast, which states is grade VII, and greater than or equal to $300 \mathrm{units}/\mathrm{ml}$, ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Alkaline Phosphatase

What is the predominant purpose of Alkaline Phosphatase in skeletal muscle fibers and liver cells. I know that it is a hydrolase enzyme that speeds up the degredation of proteins, lipids, starch and ...
1
vote
0answers
103 views

Cereal Alpha and Beta Amylase temperature range and reaction rate

This question is motivated by a practical application in bread making. While it is well known which are the optimal (highest reaction rate) temperatures for both alpha and beta amylase, I am not able ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

If I were to flush enzymes down with a cellulose rich food, what would happen?

Lets say I were to consume an adequate concentration of cellulase and cellubiose with a cellulose rich food. Would nothing happen, would I successfully extract calories from the cellulose, or would it ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Is there a deblocking aminopeptidase without normal aminopeptidase activity?

The deblocking aminopeptidase is a unique exo-type aminopeptidase that liberates blocking groups (formyl, acetyl, and myristyl) from proteins and peptides. However, according to this paper, it has two ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Will a metalloenzyme bind to its substrate in the absence of its metal ion cofactor?

A metalloenzyme is an enzyme using a specific metal ion as its cofactor. Their activity is dependent on this metal ion. For example, the T4 DNA ligase requires Mg2+ to ligate DNA strands; The ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

What cures pineapple burns?

If you already ate too much bromelain in pineapple, how do you cure your tongue burn?
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Enzymes and cofactors

About how much % of the human enzymes need cofactors? Like 20%, 30%, or 50% of a cell's enzymes? And how many enzymes work "alone"? This is a general question to figure things out. Do most enzymes ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Nagalase testing any good?

Is Nagalase testing good to detect if something is wrong in the body (ex: cancer)? The next problem I assume would be to know what/where the problem is. To put it an other way: If I understand ...
0
votes
0answers
81 views

Medical Uses of toxic venom

One interesting thing I recently learned is that venom has medical uses that can actually save lives! But from what I see so far this either applies to venoms from creatures that are not fatal to ...