Organisms whose cells contain organelles, complex structures enclosed within membranes, in particular a nucleus.

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Could viruses be used as antibiotics?

Could we use viruses that only affect bacteria to act as antibiotics? The more bacteria, the more times the virus divides, so the stronger it gets. Is this practical?
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791 views

Methods of nuclear transfection - nuclear transport

I am reading through the ENCODE papers, which is taking me well out of my comfort zone in terms of modern laboratory techniques. At the risk of asking a question which may well be thoroughly answered ...
10
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798 views

Linear and Circular DNA

So school has taught us that eukaryotes have DNA that is linear and inside of a membrane - called the nucleus. And that prokaryotes have circular DNA that is free floating inside of the cell. We ...
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40 views

How to grow fibroblast colonies from single cells?

I need to establish a cell line starting from single cells seeded on a 96 wells plate by a FACS sorter. The cells I am using are human fibroblasts RPE-1 cultured in F12 medium supplemented with 10% ...
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0answers
29 views

How stable is linear DNA transfected in eukaryotic cells?

I would like to know, with references from the literature, what is the half life of a linear dsDNA transfected in a mammalian cells. For example, if I transfect human cells with a PCR product ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Is episome a plasmid or a virus?

A plasmid is a small DNA molecule that is physically separate from, and can replicate independently of, chromosomal DNA within a cell. In general, in eukaryotes, episomes are closed circular DNA ...
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1answer
160 views

Are HeLa cells edible?

I'm curious if HeLa cells are intrinsically poisonous or dangerous to ingest. My understanding is that some of the contamination in HeLa cells such as HPVs are not readily expressed. I have no plans ...
3
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1answer
451 views

Pros/cons: linear vs. circular DNA [duplicate]

Why did Eukaryotes evolve to have linear DNA and not circular like Prokaryotes? What are the pros and/or cons?
4
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1answer
110 views

Trying to differentiate between the three muscle tissues with small pictures

For an assignment I have to differentiate the three types of muscle tissues in these three pictures . I'm having difficulty seeing the striations and branches etc. because the pictures are so small. ...
13
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1answer
544 views

The Origin of Mitochondria

For a long time I've just accepted, because it is just what everyone told me, that mitochondria became organelles in the cell when they were "engulfed" by another cell which acted like it's host. This ...
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147 views

What is most simple eukaryotic genome?

Expressed in number of Base Pairs or Bytes, about how large is the simplest eukaryotic genome? How much of this is 'junk-DNA' (non-coding)?
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Asexual reproduction and Telomeres

Many eukaryotic organisms like yeasts, hydras , planarias, plants etc reproduce asexually. Replication of End of linear DNA pose a limit to the number of cell divisions. My question : Do asexually ...
6
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1answer
240 views

What is the best way to express two proteins in a mammalian cell?

I have two proteins and I will be preparing a vector with both genes for stable transfection. Each protein will have their own promoter and I will use piggyBac vector to insert a single cassette with ...
6
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1answer
274 views

Does GTP-γS (GTP gamma S) bind all GTP-binding proteins?

I've just read an article Rab10 GTPase regulates ER dynamics and morphology - Nature Cell Biology 15, 169–178 (2013) doi:10.1038/ncb2647. In this paper, to identify Rab proteins in ER, first they ...
3
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1answer
610 views

Do adipose cells divide in adults?

I have a dim recollection of having heard that when humans gain weight, adipose cells just get larger, rather than dividing. True?
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351 views

Do any cells change in size or mass as mammals grow?

That is to say, are there cells that, between infancy and adulthood, get larger? Or is all growth done entirely via cell division? I'm wondering if it is safe to assume that the approximate number ...
8
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1answer
563 views

Why aren't mitochondria and plastids considered symbiotes of eukaryotic cells?

Mitochondria and plastids have their own DNA, their own membranes, and their reproduction is not tied to the reproductive cycle of the host cell. However, they are considered to be organelles rather ...
4
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0answers
34 views

What metabolically happens when an egg fuses with the nucleus of a somatic cell

In stem cell biology, it is recognized that embryonic stem cells are transcriptionally inactive for the first 3 days of development. However, during somatic cell nuclear transfer, the nucleus is ...
5
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1answer
310 views

What is the benefit for cells having the ATP production regulated in mitochondria compared to being from the nucleus?

Mitochondria have their own DNA and appear to be loosely connected to the nucleus and it role. Why are the functions of mitochondria not in the nucleus? Why doesn't the nucleus control the ...
10
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2answers
251 views

Overlapping genetic information in eukaryotes

In my research, I look at a lot of gene predictions / annotations. Frequently, I see loci where multiple gene models overlap. I haven't taken a systematic approach to analyzing these cases, but I do ...
5
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1answer
1k views

How does the Golgi Apparatus perform its function?

The Golgi Apparatus is an organelle with a great number of functions, I am particularly intrigued in the role it plays in packaging macromolecules and sending them to their target organelle or to ...