Changes in the heritable attributes of populations of organisms over time. The mechanisms of evolution are mutation, migration, drift, and selection.

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Can you naturally change your DNA that's passed to your offsprings? [on hold]

Is it possible to change the genes that you'll pass on to your offsprings by natural activity and behavior. For example if you do body building for quite a long time build strong muscles then would ...
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42 views

Why did we evolve to control our breath?

I had this question in my mind and tried to think of why we would evolve to be able to control our breath. I remembered the Aquatic Ape Hypothesis, which makes a lot of sense and would explain it, ...
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34 views

Why is sex pleasure giving activity but not childbirth?

Asking from an evolutionary viewpoint. Sex is a pleasure giving activity so that it encourages reproduction and spreading of genes. But childbirth ,the most crucial part of the reproductive process, ...
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105 views

Why aren't there any transitional animals today?

You have probably heard this question before and in different formats. Usually, it is used as a "proof" to disprove the theory of evolution. I understand that the apes we descended from are not the ...
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15 views

How the Phereoeca uterella (casebearer) is formed? [on hold]

Does anyone know how the Phereoeca uterella known as the casebearer is formed or born?
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Would there be any other possibly exceptional phenomenons happen in the study of ' Concordance of monozygotic and dizygotic twins for traits'?

I am a first learner in this realm and I could not really understand any other academic papers on the websites , which is complicated for me .So I not sure how to use them effectively to support my ...
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37 views

What animals have a blood-brain barrier?

I am curious about how old the BBB is, in terms of evolution. Is it present in all vertebrates? or just mammals? or what?
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31 views

Book recommendation: Modern Synthetic theory

I'm a zoology minor. I wish to study modern synthetic theory (evolution) is there a good book available online for reading? The book should cover a basic idea about what the elements of modern ...
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80 views

Why is the manchineel tree so poisonous?

The machineel tree is incredibly toxic to humans. What advantage could Hippomane mancinella have for being so poisonous? It's name even apparently translates to “little apple that makes horses mad”. ...
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23 views

Are antibiotic-resistant bacteria necessarily less virulent than their original strain?

In the absence of antibiotic treatment, is there a reduction in the average severity of disease caused by resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria compared to wild-type ones? I would assume that ...
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44 views

Would someone lose some of their traits if they stop using them for some time? [closed]

A co-worker of mine told me, that there are some mutations in the genome during the life of a human body. So, the body changes genes to fit better into the surrounding environment. My thought is now, ...
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27 views

What empirical evidence of genetic assimilation is there?

There have been many articles arguing that we should view the phenotype in the center of evolutionary theory rather than the genotype as done in most population (or quantitative) genetics. A typical ...
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15 views

Are there any individual animals that can thrive in a wide range of core temperatures? [closed]

Surely, some cold blooded animals are in a position where they can't escape the changing temperatures the environment throws at them, so natural selection would have enabled them to thrive in a wide ...
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24 views

What is the effective population size of a simple two deme metapopulation?

I am confused as to how to compute the effective population size $N_e$ of a theoretical structured population. Let's consider here a simple case study. Imagine a 2-deme metapopulation. Each deme is ...
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3answers
73 views

How valid is the theory of human's chimp-pig origin? [closed]

Edit: I have also asked the question on skeptics.stackexchange.com and it has been answered there. Here is the link. There is a person called Dr. Eugene McCarthy who has a theory that the origin of ...
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42 views

Is there an evolutionary advantage associated with migraine? [duplicate]

I have read Wikipedia article on Genetics of migraine headaches and I don't buy it Because genetics influence susceptibility to migraine, it can be shaped by evolution. Fitness-impairing ...
3
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1answer
33 views

Is there more diversity in marine species?

I was reading about how life emerged from oceans, and the following question occured to me. Do land species suffer from the founder effect and is there more (genetic) diversity in marine species? A ...
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Why are turtles classified as reptiles and not amphibians?

I understand that turtles are reptiles because like all reptiles, they have scales on their body. But turtles (specifically sea turtles) live on both land and water, very much like amphibians. Also, ...
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31 views

Why don't animals need filtered water? [duplicate]

Almost 10 years back when I was a kid, we had a picture in our school text of wild buffaloes drinking water from a river - which was visibly muddy. I asked my mother of why we need to drink filtered ...
2
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1answer
49 views

Why does the wavelength in curly hair differ?

Different people and animals have different wavelengths in the curls in their hair. I understand what purposes hair serves in protecting the skin from light and bugs. I am wondering about the eventual ...
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76 views

Relationship between lifespan and reproductive age?

I remember reading a while ago that there is a "general rule" in biology between an animals lifespan and when they reach reproductive age. In other words, an organism that reaches sexual maturity ...
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62 views

Are heterozygotes always fitter than homozygotes? Can inbreeding be beneficial?

Inbreeding is mostly not very good because when there is a 'disease' in one allele, the other could/would take over the function. But when you have two of the same genes/alleles, do they, or could ...
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59 views

Why do horses recycle their endometrial lining while humans don't?

How does not recycling the endometrial lining of the uterus benefit humans (and other organisms that menstruate), while recycling it is beneficial to horses (and other organisms that undergo estrus ...
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347 views

How do traits with no negative effects get “weeded out” via evolution?

If only those who are most fit to reproduce are the ones reproducing the most, it makes sense that traits that prevent one from reproducing would eventually disappear from a population. But what ...
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86 views

What's the correct name for the war of sexes in evolution?

I'm searching for the correct term for the part of the selfish gene evolution regarding sexes. In nature, this means the evolution of the traits such as the ducks' adaptation to "trap" the drakes' ...
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1answer
55 views

What is the difference between natural selection and adaptation?

From what I've read it seems that the only actual difference is that creationists use adaptation and people who believe in evolution use natural selection. But otherwise, from my understanding, the ...
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129 views

Why are the human knees and elbows bent in an opposite direction

I can assume that the hands used to be the same as legs. And they got weaken, and changed direction when human started to walk on two? Also why do the hand palms facing the body and not facing down ...
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Ecological specialization and relative abundance

I am reading Evolution in Changing Environments by R. Levin but have a hard time. Claim At page 25, Levin says as a conclusion The more efficient a caste at meeting the contingency for which it ...
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119 views

Hamilton's Rule in practice

I came across this question in USABO 2013 open exam: A mother antelope and its child are galloping along the plains, when they encounter a group of hungry lions. If the two antelopes try to escape ...
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22 views

Without plant breeding and domestication, would most of the foods consumed by humans evolve to become inedible?

Would this happen? Do species evolve to avoid being consumed, especially the animal species which have no need to leave seeds?
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42 views

If crocodiles are k-selected, why do they supposedly “not age,” as in avoid senescence?

I recently saw a few sources stating that Crocodiles do not biologically age, implying negligible senescence. Basically, a 70 year old crocodile is in the same physical/health condition as a 7 year ...
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1answer
94 views

Is evolution a predictive theory? [closed]

My feeling is that almost any observation can be explained by current evolutionary theory. Is there any example of someone developing a rigorous framework or mathematical model of how evolution works?
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1answer
33 views

How does mutualism arise? [closed]

How can a mutualism between two species arise? I have thinking about this for a while and I have come up with the following points 1.If mutualism gives one specie a competitive edge over its ...
11
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1answer
996 views

Darwin's first sketch of a phylogenetic tree

Coming from Darwin's notebook this first sketch of a phylogenetic tree became one of the most emblematic image from Darwin's work. I have a hard time to read what is written on it. What is written ...
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1answer
41 views

What are Some Classical Examples of Local Adaptation?

Question Can you please give a list of classical (textbook) examples of local adaptations? How to answer Examples don't necessarily need to include what evidence supports this specific example of ...
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135 views

Have people in Africa already started evolving resistance to AIDS?

Are people living in areas where AIDS is rampant (for e.g. Africa), less likely to die from it than they once were because some of the people without genes/mutations that give them resistance already ...
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1answer
17 views

Statistical genetics: Allele frequencies that follow a Dirichlet distribution

From Foll and Gagiotti (2008) (software BayeScan). They consider a model where several subpopulation are derived from a unique ancestral population. We consider a set of $I$ loci and let $K_i$ be ...
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47 views

Simple computational biology project for AP Biology class. Ideas? [closed]

Our teacher assigned us a project to do with an extremely open-ended prompt and it should be completed within a month. I was planning on doing something related to computation and evolution in terms ...
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1answer
55 views

Is there selection against long proteins and long genes?

Background thought Titin and TTN Titin is the largest protein in the human genome with 33423 amino acids. Titin is coded by the gene TTN that must be at least $3 \cdot 33423 \approx 100kb$ long. ...
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1answer
136 views

What were the camels' humps good for back in the polar areas?

I've heard that camels lived in the North America formerly and just in the last few thousands years they've migrated to the hot deserts. Thus they allegedly utilized the adaptations against the cold ...
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How can birds disperse seeds when they are able to digest them?

I've just read in a book that birds' guts can digest almost all the consumed seeds with the exception of mistletoe and loranthus (which stays stuck on the branches). On the other hand, I know that the ...
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26 views

What model of epistasis best fit the reality?

In theoretical population genetics, it is very common to have to assume a model of epistatic interaction. The two most common models are the additive model and the multiplicative model. Additive ...
3
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What negative effects does cannabalism have in other species (like prion diseases) and how are they mitigated?

It is well known that human cannibals are likely to suffer from a variety of ailments, particularly prion diseases. However a great many other species, from insect to ape practice cannibalism at much ...
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50 views

Evolution & Celluar Chemistry [closed]

I'm new to this site but had a question on evolution, apologies if some of these questions seem basic but they are from a book i am reading challenging the role of chance in evolution. Taking the ...
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21 views

Ewens-Watterson Test of Neutrality

The Ewens-Watterson test is one of the first test of neutrality (of no selection). Later came tests such as Tajima's D or Fu, Li's G and many other. Question Can you please make a description of how ...
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1answer
41 views

How does epigenetics know to mutate which gene in order to survive? [closed]

It seems that during reproduction particular genes are targeted for modification (mutation, deletion, insertion, etc.) given environmental inputs of either or both of the parents. If a creature was ...
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54 views

Disposable Soma Theory and the case of the contraposition

According to August Weismann (1889), Kirkwood and Holliday (1979): Because of the evolution of an organism that is segregated into soma and germ cells, soma becomes disposable, and in the face of ...