Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
1answer
23 views

Quantitative Trait Locus process?

I do not seem to understand the concept of Quantitative Trait Loci(QTL's), can anyone explain it to me in detail? Reading the wikipedia article helped somewhat, but I do not understand it well. What ...
0
votes
1answer
481 views

TCGA data, and bioinformatics design questions for SNP/ mirna analysis

It's my first time posting to this forum but was looking for some help on the data aspects of this project. My tools of choice would be in python/R . Goal: I'm looking to create a disease specific ...
2
votes
0answers
104 views

Best way to automatically link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol in TCGA

I am trying to figure out how to link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol, for TCGA dataset. So far, I have found this ftp directory with Gene info updated daily. But, for Entrez ID 728661, I have found ...
1
vote
1answer
254 views

Mapping a mutation to known SNP, 3' UTR, miR

I've parsed out a very large TCGA cancer ssm (single mutation file) file to give me the essential information. The ssm is in the following format: ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

How TCGA CNV values are calculated?

When I download CNV SNP array data for ovarian cancer from TCGA data portal, I see some very small numbers like -5, -6 in the "Segment_Mean" column of the segmentation data files. I am very new to ...
9
votes
1answer
119 views

Circadian Clock During a Flight

I am interested to know how does our Circadian Clock respond (and its resultant changes if any) when we are traveling across Time Zones? UPDATE 24th April I am reopening this question as the ...
3
votes
0answers
38 views

Y Chromosome in Ovary Cancer Data

I have been analyzing TCGA Ovary Cancer data. In Somatic Mutation data, there is data of mutations in all the chromosomes (1-22 and X), but amazingly, I have found one (just one) row of Y Chromosome ...
4
votes
1answer
21 views

In human females one X chromosome is inactivated forming Barr Body. Then How exactly Haemophilia is dominant? check description for details

Suppose a female has one X chromosome normal and one chromosome with Haemophilic gene. Now suppose if the X chromosome which is normal is inactivated will the female show haemophilia?
5
votes
1answer
39 views

what is linkage disequilibrium supposed to measure?

During reading about genetics I came across with the term of linkage disequilibrium, and I do not really understand what it supposed to mean. What is linkage disequilibrium? My current understanding ...
2
votes
2answers
31 views

Help reading chromatogram

A genetic variation is found in this chromatogram: It says that the "reference sequence" is the top line and that I can use the general genetic code to find the reading frame. I can see that there ...
5
votes
2answers
65 views

GWAS: why is replication in another cohort so crucial?

Almost all the landmark GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Studies) reviews agree that, for a GWAS finding to be valid, it needs to be replicated in an independent cohort. What exactly is the rationale ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

“bead” on a string theory of genetics, source?

Thomas Hunt Morgan was a pioneer in genetics and proposed the now false model of genes being "beads" on a string. These beads being indivisible and responsible for a single phenotype, if I understand ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Is it possible to knock out a gene in adults?

gene knockout is mainly used in creating newborn animals... right? Well can you do it to already-adult animals or humans so that they themselves would experience change in their body and not just ...
1
vote
2answers
406 views

Did cats evolve from monkeys ? or vice versa?

Did cats evolve from monkeys ? or vice versa ? How similar are the genes of cats and monkeys ? What is the proof that they are related or that they are not related ? Most monkeys climb in trees and ...
3
votes
0answers
15 views

What is the most reliable tumour suppressing gene for NSCLC?

I was looking at some tumour suppressing genes that can be helpful in diagnosing lung cancer (particularly NSCLC - Non-small-cell lung carcinoma) at an early stage. I came across a few such as p53, ...
10
votes
2answers
335 views

Are there differences in DNA between humans of today and humans from 2000 years ago?

Are there any significant differences in our genome compared to the genes of our ancestors from 1000-2000 years ago? And if there are significant differences, do they result in significant ...
6
votes
2answers
61 views

Do the eggs for larger litters come from the same meiosis events, or different ones?

There are some species of animals that give birth to more than one pup at a time. In these species, are the fertilized eggs all from one or a limited group of meiosis processes, or are they from ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

How do I make conclusions from the autoradiograph of a Southern blot?

Here's another question taken from "Concepts of Genetics," Klug et al (10ed), revolving around a paternity test. PCR and a Southern blot were carried out in order to determine whether 3 chimpanzees ...
5
votes
0answers
206 views

Genetic expression in interspecific hybrids

Referring to interspecific hybrids, I have the following two questions:- Quoting from wikipedia:- The offspring of an interspecific cross are very often sterile; thus, hybrid sterility ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

Forensic genetics- why is mtDNA comparison sometimes better than nDNA comparison?

Why is (in forensic genetics) in some cases more appropriate comparison of nuclear DNA but in some other cases comparison of mitochondrial DNA? Is it because geneticists are sometimes unable to find ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Genetic Relationship Matrix

The classical definition of the Genetic Matrix G = ZZ'/2p(1-p) where Z = M - P where P = 2(p-0.5) I don't have a background in biology but understand Maths and ...
6
votes
1answer
67 views

“Enhancers” of enhancers?

I am looking for examples (if any) of genomic regions which regulates the activity of enhancers, either augmenting or reducing it. Essentially some kind of enhancers (or repressors) of enhancers to ...
4
votes
2answers
52 views

How can (or did) Deinococcus radiodurans continue to evolve after developing resistance to mutation?

Deinococcus radiodurans has a remarkable ability to resist damage to its DNA due to radiation, dehydration or (to my knowledge) any other source. It keeps multiple copies of its genome and has a ...
2
votes
1answer
23 views

Term for a leaf in a family tree

Imagine a family pedigree. Mathematically it is a graph, which consists of nodes and edges. Nodes being family members, and edges - their relationships. In a clinical setting, what is the proper ...
7
votes
1answer
82 views

Genotype to phenotype map and the G-matrix

Suppose I have a genotype-phenotype map defined by the matrix $\mathbf{Z}$:         The scalars $G,P$ represent the number of genotypes and traits, respectively. ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

What governs the distribution of blood vessels?

Whenever someone is sick, doctor places 2 fingers on wrist & observes the heart-beat-rate by feeling pulses of a certain artery. To me it seems the distribution of blood vessels are pretty ...
5
votes
0answers
34 views

How can the phenotypic effects of a tumor suppressor mutation be silenced?

I've been reading a little about the "two-hit" hypothesis for tumor suppressor genes here, which mentions that some genes exhibiting haploinsufficiency are exceptions to the hypothesis. I've read ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

How to tell if a given gene is a tumor suppressor or oncogene?

This is a problem taken from "Concepts of Genetics", Klug et al, 10e. I'm given the following table about the mutations in the BRCA1 gene: $$\begin{array}{c|c|c|c|c} ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Definitions of robustness and canalization

The concepts of robustness and canalization are fashionable today in the biology literature. However, I am not sure of their definitions and I am not sure either that all authors actually use the same ...
1
vote
1answer
564 views

Why didn't a concept like “pointers” in Computer Science evolve in the genome?

I see that the genome contains large regions of repeating sequences called interspersed or dispersed elements. The long dispersed elements (LINES) such as LINE-1, can reach up to 6-8 kb in length. ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Swapping genes?

So, gene therapy is to take out a gene, correct its mutation, and put the corrected one back into the organism, right? Is it also possible to take out a gene from an organism and put in a totally ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Where to find gene manipulation video (or photos)

I hope Im not asking a dumb question! Where can i find video of gene manipulation in action under microscope? Like extracting a gene from a cell, fixing gene mutations, putting the gene in a vector, ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Are genotypes with the same two alleles equivalent even if the alleles come from different parents?

I am looking at the following question If $m$ alleles may occur at a given locus, how many distinct diploid genotypes are possible at that locus? The obvious answer is that there their is $m$ ...
2
votes
0answers
30 views

Do The Traces Genetic Diseases Remain in families?

I know that there are certain diseases that are predominant on genes. But, is there any sort of surety that if parents are suffering from a disorder then their offspring has to suffer from the same. ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Hardy-Weinberg Color-blind

In a city, 4% of male population have color blindness. How many of the female are (a) color blind carrier, (b) color blind? Suppose the city holds Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. My progress: 4% of male ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Horizontal Gene Transfer

I understand the different ways bacteria can undergo horizontal gene transfer (transformation, transduction (phages), conjugation (plasmids)). Is there an experimental method to tell how a specific ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Markers for human genetic mapping

For human genetic mapping several different types of markers are used: RFLPs (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms) VNTRs (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) such as mini- and microsatellites ...
5
votes
1answer
155 views

Where do amino acids get attached to tRNA and where is it synthesized?

Some very basic parts of transcription/translation seem to be left out in various literature. I can't find the answer to this anywhere: How exactly is tRNA synthesized? I realize that mRNA is ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Solid mouse (C57BL/6) WT primers

I am trying to get a good pair (or better yet, library of pairs) of primers that give me one band in WT mice (C57BL/6). Do you know where I could find such a thing? Alternatively, I thought of just ...
33
votes
5answers
1k views

Why do men have nipples?

I'd be tempted to call nipples in men vestigial, but that suggests they have no modern function. They do have a function, of course, but only in women. So why do men (and all male mammals) have them? ...
8
votes
3answers
178 views

Splice in with CRISPR/Cas

I need to splice a gene into a human cell genome, with highest rate possible. I mean, doesn't really matter where the gene enters, nor does it matter if some cells die as a result of this. CRISPR ...
1
vote
2answers
308 views

X Linked Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium Problem

In a given population under Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, 40.0% of men have hemophilia. What is the probability that a random man and random woman will have a daughter with haemophilia? I think the ...
4
votes
1answer
27 views

Epistasis Across Chromosomes and Individuals 'Homozygous for Interactions'

Apologies for any failures in nomenclature. I'm a mathematician who is making a foray into genetics for a masters thesis. Specifically, I'm generating artificial diploid genetic sequence data and ...
5
votes
1answer
42 views

How does de-myelination occur in multiple sclerosis?

From what I understand, only the oligodendrocytes are affected in multiple sclerosis, and they are attacked by T cells which cross the blood-brain barrier. This leads me to two questions: How is the ...
5
votes
1answer
55 views

Is probability for double crossing over included in distance cM? [task]

We got this task: There are 3 genes (acb) on one chromosome (linked inheritance). Distance a-c = 12cM, a-b=16cM. Probability for double crossing-over (CO) is 0,6%. Find ratio of genotypes of ...
5
votes
1answer
87 views

Understanding recombination scoring in family pedigrees

I am having some problems understanding recombination, and I am not sure what element I am missing here. This figure is an example from my text book. The pedigree belongs to a family with an autosomal ...
5
votes
1answer
121 views

Are there any mutagens that can undo the mutations they cause?

I was reading a section from my textbook about tautomeric shifts, and it seems to suggest that there are some mutagens that can be directly responsible for the phenomenon. The section is mainly ...
3
votes
1answer
219 views

Possible genotypes for blood types?

If I am blood type B, what are all the possible genotypes that could be expressed by my parents? I think it might be 16 but I was reading online and saw this: Similarly, someone who is blood type ...
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Genetically improved *Leucaena leucocephala* seeds

I am looking for fast growing Leucaena leucocephala seeds. Now, I am cultivating Leucaena leucocephala which can grow 6 meters in a year. But I am looking for a genetically improved seed which can ...
9
votes
1answer
122 views

Why does polyploidy give an evolutionary advantage?

I would like to know what advantages polyploidy holds. I have come across a few examples during my research of polyploidy, for example human adults' hearts contain 27% diploid, 71% tetraploid and 2% ...