Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

9
votes
5answers
1k views

Do human cells contain only one copy of the genome?

Does each cell contain only a single copy of its genome? Or are there ever 'extra' copies present. Reason behind question: Wondering whether gene mutations could be corrected by referencing a ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

Where can I upload non-human Genotype data?

I have genotype data from few chicken population and I want to (need to) upload them somewhere online with free access. I have searched the web but I haven't found any place for non-human genotype ...
1
vote
3answers
148 views

How is incomplete dominance different from codominance?

Ok let me start with the definitions of incomplete dominance and codominance. incomplete dominance - The situation in which the phenotype of heterozygotes is intermediate between the phenotypes of ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

Ways to measure effectiveness of a gene therapy trial?

I understand that Fluorescence in situ hybridisation can be used to measure the effectiveness of a gene therapy experiment/trial. But what are some other genetics techniques to measure the ...
5
votes
1answer
105 views

Restriction Mapping - Homework question

I have trouble in solving this exercise. Exercise A circular plasmid of 10,000 base pairs (bp) is digested with two restriction enzymes,A and B, to produce a 3000 bp and a 2000 bp bands when ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

RNAs arising from intergenic regions

Which type of RNA molecule is coded for in intergenic regions? I think it must be a non-coding RNA but I'm unsure which type.
4
votes
1answer
40 views

What is 'independent assortment'?

What is the definition of 'independent assortment'. I tried researching this term but came back with two results: alleles assort themselves independently of different alleles the alignment of ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Is there an association between environmental and mutational robustness?

The robustness of a genotype is the ability of this genotype to resist (always produce the same phenotype) to various parameters such as mutations and environment. The ability of a genotype to resist ...
3
votes
1answer
37 views

Looking for a gene in my raw genetic data. What are the possible causes for this?

Obviously, I barely know what I am talking about. But I want to find the "MUC5B promoter polymorphism rs35705950" in my RAW genetic data from 23andMe. (see this ...
5
votes
2answers
523 views

Why is the DNA codon table “equal” to the RNA codon table

Before anything else please pay attention of the double quotes on the "equal" in the title - I know they are not equal, but you will understand in a bit. If I look at the DNA codon table here or in ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

During bridge amplification of DNA sequences, why aren't sequences amplified in both orientations?

During bridge amplification, when sequences attached to adapters on the surface form "bridges" and are replicated, it seems like sequences with either end attached to the surface will be created. For ...
5
votes
2answers
70 views

How to identify genes required for biofilm formation

This is just a homework question: Q: Let’s assume that there is an unknown set of E. coli genes that are required for biofilm formation. Describe a genetic experiment you could perform to try to ...
4
votes
1answer
102 views

Will genetically modified food affect our health?

It's a popular public sentiment that - GM foods like tomatoes (flavr savr) will affect our health.. Is there any logical scientific explanation behind this?
2
votes
2answers
40 views

regarding genetic disorders related to protein production

I am not completely familiar with biology, but i had a genetics course in college along with practicals. Forgive me if there is something wrong with my question. Is there a genetic disease which ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

What is this bizarre in-growth in this red bell pepper?

I just chanced upon a rather strange red bell pepper (or capsicum?): The green formation is bulbous to touch, just the like the outside of the bellpepper, and it has the same smell as one. I'm no ...
1
vote
2answers
529 views

Book Recommendations: GRE Subject Test In Biochemistry, Cell And Molecular Biology

There are probably a lot of really good answers that may vary significantly in terms of content. I'm looking for a set of books that I can read in preparation for the GRE Subject Test In ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

Is it possible to genetically modify a plant at home?

Would I be able to genetically modify a plant at home? What equipment will be necessary? I think it might be a fun change from the 'norm' of regular hybridisation, to try some inter-family gene ...
14
votes
1answer
199 views

Paralogous genes in genome-wide association studies?

Has anybody tested if paralogous genes are over-represented among the genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS)? For example, if a GWAS study finds 200 genes associated to the ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

Centriole genes Knock-out Experiment in Common experimental animals?

Anyone know of any experiments that have knocked out the genes for producing centrioles in a worm, mouse, fish, fly or whatever animal? Are the genes for centrioles even identified? It has been shown ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Where do I purchase a fly with the collagen tagged?

Where can I purchase a fly with tagged collagen? My senior undergraduate research paper is observing the collagen in larvae with normal diet compared to larvae with an experimental diet. I need ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Do human visual functions degenerate due to genetic factors or by external factors?

Does eyesight primarily deteriorate 'naturally' due to genetics (genomic/epigenomic factors), or due to external factors such as normal wear and tear, or disease? By normal wear and tear I include ...
14
votes
2answers
349 views

Why was it so hard to decode the corn genome?

My teachers growing up told me it was impossible to decode the maize genome. But yet its been done. Why was decoding the genome so significant, and what made it so difficult?
0
votes
1answer
170 views

Need of X or Y chromosome protein after meiosis

After meiosis each spermatid get either the X chromosome or the Y chromosome. I know that the 4 spermatids formed from 1 spermatogonia are connected by cytoplasm and so the proteins made by X or Y ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Which is better against genetic mutations? Asexual or Sexual Reproduction?

In terms of genetics, which type of reproduction is better against adverse mutations? I understand a bit of Muller's Ratchet—in which asexual organisms accumulate a number of deleterious mutations in ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Word denoting genetic state

Is there a single word, or brief phrase, that denotes the state of the total genetic machinery (genome + transcriptome + proteome + ...) of a cell or organ or organism at a particular point in time?
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Definitions of robustness and canalization

The concepts of robustness and canalization are fashionable today in the biology literature. However, I am not sure of their definitions and I am not sure either that all authors actually use the same ...
4
votes
3answers
151 views

Results of a complete DNA sequencing - are they 100% reusable?

Is that correct that a complete DNA sequencing (the whole genome) need only to be done once (per person)? After that is done, it the complete genome can be stored and once the new genes (and their ...
4
votes
2answers
336 views

Double mutant analysis with null mutants

My professor was talking about double mutant analysis with null mutants, and how double mutant analysis won't work with hypomorphs. I really don't understand the concept of double mutant analysis. ...
5
votes
2answers
53 views

Is there are practical lower limit to gene length in E. coli?

Question is rather self-explanatory. Putting aside other post-transcriptional factors like rate of degradation of transcript, what is the smallest gene ever reported to have successfully been ...
3
votes
2answers
38 views

Heterochromatin production limitations

Currently playing with some ideas for a project and needed some guidance. I am wondering, both in Drosophila melanogaster and in general, is the amount of heterochromatin a cell/nucleus can produce ...
3
votes
1answer
39 views

Why are the genomes of some trees so large?

For example, the current longest known genome belongs to a tree: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-largest-genome-ever-sequenced-belongs-to-a-tree I have heard that this could potentially be ...
4
votes
1answer
756 views

How do I calculate the change in allele frequency in a haploid population under selection?

From this book For simplicity, let us consider a haploid organism and assume that the frequencies of alleles $A_1$ and $A_2$ are given by $x$ and $y=1-x$, respectively. We also assume that the ...
6
votes
1answer
233 views

What is the minimum population size that Hardy-Weinberg calculations can be applied to?

I'm trying to find out if a particular allele is in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, but the data is poor. What's the minimum population number that you can use to get any sort of respectable ...
6
votes
1answer
110 views

Hill-Roberston effects and effective population size

From this article, first page, middle of the second column: Even if harmful alleles do not become fixed, they can still reduce the efficacy of selection on neighbouring loci through a process ...
8
votes
2answers
681 views

Do men have a higher genetic variance than women?

I've heard that with the distribution of our genetic code women have less variation on the bell curve than men. Is there any basis for this? It was my understanding that women have more genetic ...
4
votes
2answers
365 views

Why is the strength of genetic drift inversely proportional to the population size?

I saw a concept on the Internet that says "the strength of genetic drift is inversely proportional to the population size". I don't know why they are inversely proportional? Can somebody explain? ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Physiological function of CFTR gene product? [duplicate]

I just need a clarification. If I am to talk about the physiological function of the CFTR gene product? Then what should I do research and talk about? The only physiological function that I can ...
48
votes
4answers
7k views

Why 22 amino acids instead of 64?

This question got me thinking about amino acids and the ambiguity in the genetic code. With 4 nucleotides in RNA and 3 per codon, there are 64 codons. However, these 64 codons only code for 22 ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Is this a valid definition of independent assortment?

"Allelic combinations separate randomly. I.e. a parent might be Aa and Bb for two traits but that doesn't necessarily mean the gametes will strictly be AB or ab but any of a number of combinations. ...
0
votes
2answers
131 views

What are non-heritable changes to genomes?

I am told that mutations are heritable changes to the genome. So this begs the question - what are non-heritable changes to genome?
0
votes
1answer
56 views

What impacts penetrance of Huntington's disease? [closed]

From Principles of Life by H. Craig Heller, David E. Sadava, Mary V. Price: From what I understand, Huntington's disease exhibits varying degrees of penetrance depending on how many times the ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

XXY (Klinefelter's) & Trisomy 21 & X-inactivation

I read that X-inactivation doesn't tend to happen in males, but then when someone is XXY, they are a male because of the Y. However these individuals tend to live. So does that mean that ...
5
votes
2answers
132 views

Functions of the CFTR gene?

I am a senior in high school and I am studying cystic fibrosis. I don't quite get the function of the CFTR gene as this is my first time dealing with this type of heavy scientific info. I had ...
6
votes
1answer
73 views

How exactly can dsRNA be introduced to a cell?

Is it just by viruses or are there other means by which it gets into cells, such as plasmid uptake?
3
votes
1answer
40 views

If hermaphrodite C. elegans can reproduce with females?

C. elegans can self fertilize, or they can mate with males. But are they able to mate with females? Or is there some kind of morphological barrier that prevents that?
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Redundancy of the genetic code

One particular codon codes only for one amino acid, but an amino acid can be coded for by several different codons. Now according to the genetic code, the codon UUU ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Earliest and latest onset of Huntington's Disease(Chorea)?

Huntington's disease can hit at any age, although it tends to hit middleaged people most often. What is the youngest and oldest person that has exhibited Huntington's? Clarification: By oldest I mean ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

DNA methylation on the forward vs reverse strand?

I'm wondering if there are meant to be differences in DNA methylation between the forward and the reverse strand of the gene? I'm wondering because in primer design for bisulfite pyrosequencing one ...
2
votes
2answers
178 views

Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium after 5 Generations

1 There is a population not at HWE where red eye = $a^+$ (dominant) and white eyes = $a^-$. if $a^+/a^+ = 0.6$ $a^-/a^+ = 0.1$ $a^-/a^- = 0.3$ what are the frequencies of the $a^+$ and $a^-$ ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Are all functions of a human cell known? [closed]

Please bear with me as I'm intruding into your world from a computer science background. In programming, once you have created a program, you know all functions of that program. Thus, 100% knowledge ...