Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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Query from a ppt slide

I came across this slide: Now I haven't understood what the last two grey colored lines mean. Can't ORFS be of any size? What is overlapping frames here?
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Book recommendation on population/evolutionary genetics?

I have recently been involved in collaborations that require me to model the population genetics of eukaryotic populations. I fear I may either be "re-inventing the wheel" or making conceptual ...
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How long does it take for a genetic trait to dissipate if its no longer selected for?

Have their been any studies or experiments done that provide insight into the persistence of genetic traits if an environmental shift suddenly causes that trait to be neutrally selected for? Does it ...
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56 views

Problem on Probabilty of a restriction enzyme cutting a random DNA sequence

I think its a silly question to ask here. When I came to this site all I could see were the questions which asked detailed explanation behind a phenomenon and reasoning was there at first place. I am ...
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What is the reason for having an extra recognition site for a restriction enzyme?

Can the size of a supercoiled plasmid DNA be determined by using standard DNA size fragment electrophoresed in parallel? 2. An unknown DNA molecule was cleaved using several restriction enzymes ...
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Why do men have nipples?

I'd be tempted to call nipples in men vestigial, but that suggests they have no modern function. They do have a function, of course, but only in women. So why do men (and all male mammals) have them? ...
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Do recessive alleles really exist?

This question may seem illogical to some, but I seriously have this doubt. I searched google for some proofs but they were extremely complex and I couldn't understand anything. I was just wondering ...
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Possible genotypes for blood types?

If I am blood type B, what are all the possible genotypes that could be expressed by my parents? I think it might be 16 but I was reading online and saw this: Similarly, someone who is blood type ...
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Do we get 1/4 of our genes from each grandparent?

I know that we get half of our genes from each parent, but does it necessarily mean we get 1/4 of our genes from each grandparent? Or is it possible that we might get say 30% from one grandparent, 20% ...
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Horizontal gene transfer from humans

It is known that some viruses embed themselves in the human genome. Is there a mechanism by which human genes can be transferred to other animals or plants by means of viruses shuttling them from ...
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208 views

Why are female not competitive for reproduction like males?

I have wondered if competition for mate among males and the race among sperm cells would result in healthy offspring, why no such mechanisms exist among females and egg cells? (Even females are ...
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24 views

Gene silencing in C. elegans

I am trying to silence the tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) gene in C. elegans using the pLT63 plasmid to check if that particular gene has anything to do with the pharyneal pumping or not. Am I using ...
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Trisomy 21 and Down syndrome

Can Down syndrome occur without trisomy 21 in the karyotype of an individual? Or vice versa can a person have trisomy 21 while unaffected by Down syndrome?
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Is this a simple Hardy-Weinberg problem?

Phenylketonuria is a severe developmental disability due to a rare autosomal recessive allele. Approximately 1 in every 10,000 newborns suffer from this disease. Calculate the frequency of the allele ...
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Color blind animals [duplicate]

So I was reading some bio books and I came upon the fact that dogs and some other animals were color blind, and so I am wondering how do we know. Did we take apart there eye or sequence some of their ...
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45 views

Why to use transgenic mice in ALS models?

In ALS mice model with mutant SOD1 - there are use of transgenic mice, with insert of human mutant SOD1. Why is that? Why not to mutate directly mice SOD1 ? In transgenic mice, after few generations ...
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QTL mapping in Drosophila

I have already googled it before but yet unsuccessful in finding the whole topic with intuition. Please help. A guide to an associated book would be greatly valued.
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Are there any arguments against the Onion Test

Are there are any sound arguments (that are simply explained) against the Onion test (http://www.genomicron.evolverzone.com/2007/04/onion-test/)? Which in turn could contribute to the argument that ...
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275 views

What is the biological significance of finding palindromes in DNA sequence?

I found a function called palindromes in Matlab that finds palindromes from DNA sequence. Now what is the biological intention behind incorporating this function? What the biological significance of ...
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29 views

how does one apply for masters in genetics abroad? [closed]

Please can some one give me step wise instructions for applying for a masters degree in genetics or biological sciences?
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33 views

Producing a genetically modified animal with cell walls [closed]

I'm curious if there has been any genetic experiments transferring cell wall producing genes into the genome of a animal model organism such as the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) or a larger ...
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28 views

A trivial question on the meaning of “relatives” in an article on horizontal gene transfer

Am I right in suggesting that by close relatives the author meant closely related species, or did he have individual organisms in mind? DETECTION OF HORIZONTAL GENE TRANSFER There are ...
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mutations induced by transposons

Question: In contrast to chemically-induced mutations, mutations induced by transposons are more likely to ... be lethal de dominant be stable revert to wild types be a gain of function The ...
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67 views

Why do males have more birth defects? [closed]

I taught in elementary school for 20 years and noticed that males were far more likely to be classified as handicapped than females. More males than females die at birth and are more likely to have ...
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63 views

How does Cas9 interact with CRISPR?

I read that Cas9 protein along with guided RNA binds at a specific DNA fragment of foreign organism integrated in a host organism DNA. To make the host immune to virus infection Cas9 along with gRNA ...
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recombination between DNA segments question

In the diagram shown above, segments A and C are copies of a repeated DNA sequence, flanking a unique stretch shown as B. A and C are in an inverted orientation relative to each other, as indicated ...
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Genotype-Phenotype databases?

Beyond the Stanford HIV database, what other databases out there provide a dataset linking virus/bacterial genotype to quantitative phenotype? I'm looking for high quality datasets to test machine ...
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Are progenies factually half-clones of the parents?

Given that a "clone" (if anything, in the context of human cloning) is taken to be, as far as I have understood, a specimen possessing the same genome as his "father/mother", aren't all "non-cloned" ...
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Do men have a higher genetic variance than women?

I've heard that with the distribution of our genetic code women have less variation on the bell curve than men. Is there any basis for this? It was my understanding that women have more genetic ...
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How does the colinearity of the HOX genes determine the body plan of an organism?

I was recently reading about colinearity in the HOX genes that give an organism its high-level body plan (where the order of the HOX genes on the chromosome follow the head-to-tail order of body ...
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Abbreviations for molecules: What are CheW, CheA, CheY?

I've encountered the abbreviations such as "CheW" and "CheA" for certain organic molecules. For example: Proteins associating with the Tar complex include the autophosphorylating protein kinase ...
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Genetics of Hybrids

I'm working on this problem, but I'm not sure I've done it correctly. My initial thought was that the answer was $D$, but I don't see anything in the above graph that indicated the Hybrid species ...
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How is incomplete dominance different from codominance?

Ok let me start with the definitions of incomplete dominance and codominance. incomplete dominance - The situation in which the phenotype of heterozygotes is intermediate between the phenotypes of ...
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Serotonin activity with short 5-HTT promotor region and depression

So after reading a few studies (1,2) it seems that a shorter promotor region for the serotonin transport protein may be associated with increased likelihood of developing depression after stressful ...
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How does the sticky ends of foreign gene bind with its counterpart in the plasmid DNA if positions are not matching?

Consider a foreign gene with recognition sequence as GAATTC for EcoR1. Now suppose that it is being cut at two palindromic sequence to form sticky ends. Here the sticky ends are formed such that ...
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How to write 100% phenotype ratio? [closed]

I am not quite sure how to write 100% out come for the phenotype ratio after using "Punnett Square". The result from the each alleles, the dominant allele completely(100%) took over the recessive ...
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What is meant by “the degree to which a gene is expressed” in an individual?

Here is an excerpt from a text that I was reading, Here is an example of microarray data. The idea is to take a group of different individuals and for each of them, you measure how much they ...
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Why don't the apples seeds from grafted trees produce the same kind of apples?

As Wikipedia says: Grafting is a horticultural technique whereby tissues from one plant are inserted into those of another so that the two sets of vascular tissues may join together. In most ...
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Why do my 23andme results only show me as 8.2% Scandinavian? [closed]

I just got my 23andme results back. My paternal grandfather was full Swedish. Shouldn't that make me 25% Swedish? 23andme tells me I'm only 8.2% Scandinavian. Or maybe my father inherited less than ...
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Rates of evolution of mitochondrial genes

I am interested in knowing the rates of evolution of different mitochondrial genes (in base pairs per million years) across different taxa. Has there been any publications along these lines ?
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Genetic mapping problem

A prototrophic Hfr strain of E. coli with the genotype trp+ purB- pyrC+ is conjugated with an F- strain with the genotype trp- purB+ pyrC- . The trp gene is known to enter last. The following numbers ...
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How C. Elegans is used for siliencing genes

The experiment that is using C. Elegans to silence the Genes. I have a question about Why and how C. Elegans can use the DNA plasmid that is generated with the gene of interest in the bacteria by ...
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Do the effect of inbreeding depression disappear after the first generation of outbreeding?

An animal that is the result of generations of inbreeding tends to have lower fitness. (More diseases etc.) This is usually explained by harmful but recessive mutations that exist in all populations, ...
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Chance of passing a risk allele to child?

Our genetics professor has posted up working for previous examination answers, but I am unsure that one of his answers is correct. My answer is close but may just be due to co-incidence. Question: ...
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260 views

Why is an HIV infection considered “incurable”?

My biology teacher told me that if one caught HIV, they cannot be cured because it was near to impossible to be completely virus-free. She said this was because HIV keeps on changing its glycoprotein ...
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Is the SRY gene the sole responsible of biological male sex?

It's very well known that the Y chromosome is what determines maleness, but more specifically this seems to happen thanks to the SRY gene located on it. Some individuals have an XX karyotype, but ...
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meaning of “initial gene constructions” vs. “under the control of plant promoters” in an article on GM plants

From "Risks from GMOs due to Horizontal Gene Transfer", by Paul Keese: Antibiotic resistance genes have been introduced to GM plants either as part of the bacterial cloning vectors used for the ...
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In what way is ADHD genetic? [closed]

According to Psychcentral depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia and autism are traceable to the same inherited genetic variations According to AsapSCIENCE, depression could be genetic due ...
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187 views

Why does supercoiled DNA run faster?

The DNA exists in linear and cirular forms. The latter form has interesting feature called Supercoiling. The more number of writhe makes it more supercoiled because of which it gets more compact. ...
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Why is A-U bond less stable than A-T bond?

I have encountered the following fact many times, but have not yet encountered a possible explanation for it. Will you please help me understand the molecular mechanism by which the bond between ...