Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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Fur genetics - what are the causes of fur colour decision?

This Australian Shepherd puppy's father is a black-tri; mother is a blue merle. What would cause this dog to have so much white color? Are there any general explanations as to why this might ...
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50 views

Coefficient of Inbreeding - implementation issue

The formula for the coefficient of inbreeding is as follows... I have a family tree going back 9 generations. Say I find a common ancestor X in the 4th generation on the mothers side and in the 5th ...
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217 views

Are non-coding RNAs introns?

I am slightly confused as to what part of the genome codes for non-coding RNAs. Is it the introns? This would make sense to me as to why they are not transcribed as the introns are not transcribed. Or ...
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54 views

Inheritance patterns in individuals with triploidy

If you search on the genetics of Down's Syndrome, you'll find plenty of results explaining the genetic mechanisms which can result in triploidy. However, I can't find any information on the ...
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55 views

How to find name of the gene

Considering the kegg page, this page contains the description of the gene Edwardsiella tarda EIB202: ETAE_0074 . Now this gene has a name given in the page as : wabG. Now considering another gene 1 ...
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1answer
413 views

Lac operon: How can lactose enter the cell in the absence of lactose permease?

My textbook states that lactose permease...transports lactose into the cell and When lactose is added to the growth medium, the lactose molecules bind to the other site on the repressor ...
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45 views

Animal gene in plants

Usually only microbes, specifically bacteria are used to express genes of other species for various functions. But, it is possible to try and express an animal gene into a plant. Bacteria like ...
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2answers
124 views

Question about proto-oncogenes and oncogenes?

My textbook says: Growth-promoting genes are called proto-oncogenes. Some can be changed into oncogenes by a point mutation that alters the ability of the proto-oncogene to be switched off. They ...
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1answer
80 views

When does a chromatid become a chromosome?

When chromosomes lie on the metaphase plate, they have the characteristic X shape. But these are actually two chromatids that are held together at the centromere. If separation fails and both ...
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127 views

How can I find the mRNA sequence for a specific prokaryotic gene?

What I want to find out is the start of the transcription for a specific gene, how long the UTR is before the actual coding sequence starts. I've looked at various databases like NCBI Gene, Refseq or ...
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1answer
50 views

Human Endogenous Retroviruses

I am reading this paper, which shows that a Human Endogenous Retrovirus (HERV) K provirus is present at the orthologous position of gorilla and chimpanzee genomes but absent in the human genome. If ...
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1answer
103 views

What does the “*” in haplogroup I2A1* mean?

I have been told that the "asterisk" in the Haplogroup 12A1* means it doesn't move down stream? What exactly does that mean in layman's terms?
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47 views

Can we create custom gene/protein?

Does it possible to create any custom gene or protein we want with current technology? I have a protein sequence or a gene sequence about 4000 bp write down on my computer, is there anyway to "print" ...
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1answer
49 views

Using evolution of bacteria against themselves

We know that mutations happen regularly in bacteria and also that one bacteria might get the mutation and become stronger than the others and thus survive, causing antibiotic resistance as well. Can ...
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1answer
213 views

Why does size decrease across the sequence of human chromosomes?

The following graph shows a decrease in the amount of base pairs per chromosome across the sequential set of human chromosomes: Is this because chromosomes were originally numbered by their size on ...
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2answers
346 views

Can bacteria release free DNA into their environment?

Natural transformation AKA natural competence involves the uptake of DNA into a competent bacterium (for horizontal gene transfer or as a food source). My question is about where this extracellular ...
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2answers
199 views

Electroporation vs gene guns [closed]

What are the pros and cons of using electroporators (left) and gene guns (right) for transformation in terms of: Price Target organism Efficacy Ease of use Maintenance
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1answer
98 views

Have there been any “chopstick gene” mistakes in genetics? [closed]

I've heard of the "chopstick gene" fallacy - wrongly assuming an association between genetics and some characteristic, confounded by non-genetic factors. Has this fallacy happened in real life? I'm ...
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2answers
53 views

Do eukaryote cells contain DNA that isn't part of a chromosome or located in the mitochondria?

I specify eukaryote in the title, but I'm also interested if this question isn't applicable to eukaryote cells in general but is to humans. I was reading "RNA-seq: An assessment of technical ...
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1answer
200 views

Which of the two chromosomes in a pair is expressed?

I have completely dummy question. I have 23 pairs of chromosomes in the cells 23 single coming from my mother and 23 single from my father. So how my cell choose which chromosome, mother's or father'...
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1answer
46 views

Query from a ppt slide

I came across this slide: Now I haven't understood what the last two grey colored lines mean. Can't ORFS be of any size? What is overlapping frames here?
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1answer
21 views

When performing mutagenesis for an assay, how do you decide on the sample size of individuals to be mutated such that all genes are covered?

If I want to study, say, gustatory response of salmons to a bile acid, I need to mutagenize a sample of salmon males. However, given that there are many genes involved in this response, what is ...
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2answers
112 views

Please explain this disrepancy about ageing

We read that ageing is related to cell death when we run out of telomeres at the end of our DNA molecules. Humans live roughly for 70 years - the traditional three-score years and ten. This compares ...
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2answers
283 views

What is the difference between fixation and loss of alleles in a population?

When running a simulation in PopG, with parameters: Population size: 100 AA fitness: 1.0 Aa fitness: 1.0 aa fitness: 1.0 Mutation A to a: 1.0E-6 Mutation a to A: 1.0E-6 Migration rate between ...
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1answer
256 views

Problem on Probabilty of a restriction enzyme cutting a random DNA sequence

I think its a silly question to ask here. When I came to this site all I could see were the questions which asked detailed explanation behind a phenomenon and reasoning was there at first place. I am ...
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1answer
37 views

How long does it take for a genetic trait to dissipate if its no longer selected for?

Have their been any studies or experiments done that provide insight into the persistence of genetic traits if an environmental shift suddenly causes that trait to be neutrally selected for? Does it ...
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1answer
179 views

What is the reason for having an extra recognition site for a restriction enzyme?

Can the size of a supercoiled plasmid DNA be determined by using standard DNA size fragment electrophoresed in parallel? 2. An unknown DNA molecule was cleaved using several restriction enzymes ...
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1answer
26 views

Gene silencing in C. elegans

I am trying to silence the tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) gene in C. elegans using the pLT63 plasmid to check if that particular gene has anything to do with the pharyneal pumping or not. Am I using ...
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223 views

Why are female not competitive for reproduction like males?

I have wondered if competition for mate among males and the race among sperm cells would result in healthy offspring, why no such mechanisms exist among females and egg cells? (Even females are ...
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15 views

Color blind animals [duplicate]

So I was reading some bio books and I came upon the fact that dogs and some other animals were color blind, and so I am wondering how do we know. Did we take apart there eye or sequence some of their ...
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1answer
52 views

Why to use transgenic mice in ALS models?

In ALS mice model with mutant SOD1 - there are use of transgenic mice, with insert of human mutant SOD1. Why is that? Why not to mutate directly mice SOD1 ? In transgenic mice, after few generations ...
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1answer
100 views

Trisomy 21 and Down syndrome

Can Down syndrome occur without trisomy 21 in the karyotype of an individual? Or vice versa can a person have trisomy 21 while unaffected by Down syndrome?
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1answer
32 views

Calculating the frequency of a recessive allele in case of three segregating alleles

Is it correct to say: A. f(A) = p; f(a) = q B. p = f(AA) + ½ f(Aa)=$\sqrt{f(AA)}$? Also, For a gene locus segregating more than two alleles, the frequency of each allele is the frequency of ...
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1answer
29 views

QTL mapping in Drosophila

I have already googled it before but yet unsuccessful in finding the whole topic with intuition. Please help. A guide to an associated book would be greatly valued.
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Are there any arguments against the Onion Test

Are there are any sound arguments (that are simply explained) against the Onion test (http://www.genomicron.evolverzone.com/2007/04/onion-test/)? Which in turn could contribute to the argument that ...
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35 views

how does one apply for masters in genetics abroad? [closed]

Please can some one give me step wise instructions for applying for a masters degree in genetics or biological sciences?
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34 views

Producing a genetically modified animal with cell walls [closed]

I'm curious if there has been any genetic experiments transferring cell wall producing genes into the genome of a animal model organism such as the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) or a larger ...
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2answers
82 views

Is this a simple Hardy-Weinberg problem?

Phenylketonuria is a severe developmental disability due to a rare autosomal recessive allele. Approximately 1 in every 10,000 newborns suffer from this disease. Calculate the frequency of the allele ...
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31 views

Genotype-Phenotype databases?

Beyond the Stanford HIV database, what other databases out there provide a dataset linking virus/bacterial genotype to quantitative phenotype? I'm looking for high quality datasets to test machine ...
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28 views

recombination between DNA segments question

In the diagram shown above, segments A and C are copies of a repeated DNA sequence, flanking a unique stretch shown as B. A and C are in an inverted orientation relative to each other, as indicated by ...
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111 views

mutations induced by transposons

Question: In contrast to chemically-induced mutations, mutations induced by transposons are more likely to ... be lethal de dominant be stable revert to wild types be a gain of function The ...
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2answers
108 views

Why do males have more birth defects? [closed]

I taught in elementary school for 20 years and noticed that males were far more likely to be classified as handicapped than females. More males than females die at birth and are more likely to have ...
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1answer
96 views

Is intelligence (or mental ability) genetically transferred (inherited characteristic) from the parent to the offspring or is it an acquired trait?

The question is simple- whether our mental ability i.e. ability to acquire and store knowledge and comprehend and analyse the stored bits, an inherited trait (i.e. genetically transmitted from the ...
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131 views

Abbreviations for molecules: What are CheW, CheA, CheY?

I've encountered the abbreviations such as "CheW" and "CheA" for certain organic molecules. For example: Proteins associating with the Tar complex include the autophosphorylating protein kinase ...
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1answer
30 views

Genetics of Hybrids

I'm working on this problem, but I'm not sure I've done it correctly. My initial thought was that the answer was $D$, but I don't see anything in the above graph that indicated the Hybrid species is,...
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1answer
59 views

Are progenies factually half-clones of the parents?

Given that a "clone" (if anything, in the context of human cloning) is taken to be, as far as I have understood, a specimen possessing the same genome as his "father/mother", aren't all "non-cloned" ...
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185 views

Why are hybrid offspring mostly sterile? [closed]

Hybrid infertility is a common trait in cross-species offspring. Most are sterile, as they do not produce viable gametes. Examples of this can include Ligers and Mules. Could modern advancement in ...
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Serotonin activity with short 5-HTT promotor region and depression

So after reading a few studies (1,2) it seems that a shorter promotor region for the serotonin transport protein may be associated with increased likelihood of developing depression after stressful ...
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1answer
2k views

How to write 100% phenotype ratio? [closed]

I am not quite sure how to write 100% out come for the phenotype ratio after using "Punnett Square". The result from the each alleles, the dominant allele completely(100%) took over the recessive ...
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241 views

How does the sticky ends of foreign gene bind with its counterpart in the plasmid DNA if positions are not matching?

Consider a foreign gene with recognition sequence as GAATTC for EcoR1. Now suppose that it is being cut at two palindromic sequence to form sticky ends. Here the sticky ends are formed such that ...