Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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Chromosomomal walking

I'm having a great deal of trouble understanding chromosomal walking, especially in regards to this article: Control of male sexual behavior and sexual orientation in Drosophila by the fruitless ...
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Have there been any “chopstick gene” mistakes in genetics? [closed]

I've heard of the "chopstick gene" fallacy - wrongly assuming an association between genetics and some characteristic, confounded by non-genetic factors. Has this fallacy happened in real life? I'm ...
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48 views

Is there is difference between “homozygosity” and “homozygosis”? [closed]

Are these just two terms for the same phenomenon, i.e., the state of being homozygous? Merriam-Webster says so, but I know dictionaries sometimes miss the nuance of scientific terms. If they are ...
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Inbred mice has no severe phenotype outcome?

Why does 20 generation of inbred mouse have no particular strange phenotypes, but on the contrary, when on purposely inbreed dogs or tigers for specific phenotype cause severe deformation of the bone ...
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291 views

What is the difference between fixation and loss of alleles in a population?

When running a simulation in PopG, with parameters: Population size: 100 AA fitness: 1.0 Aa fitness: 1.0 aa fitness: 1.0 Mutation A to a: 1.0E-6 Mutation a to A: 1.0E-6 Migration rate between ...
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Genotype of children conceived after stem cell transplant?

If you have sickle cell disease and have a succesful stem cell or bone marrow transplant, your blood type changes to AA. But what about your future children? Do your sperm or egg cells continue to ...
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162 views

When was the last common ancestor of pig and human?

Some religions regard pigs as unclean on the grounds that pig flesh is closest in composition to human flesh. I don't believe this for one instant, but it got me thinking, just how close is pig and ...
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76 views

Write the haplotypes of the family

I'm doing old exam assignments to prepare for my finals on Monday and I've stumbled on one assignment that I'm not sure how to tackle. A family with 2 children is examined for cataracts using PCR ...
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108 views

How many, and how severe, are known single gene polymorphisms for obesity?

A fairly recent meta-analysis of studies examining the association between adult obesity and polymorphisms of the FTO gene (Peng et al., 2011). The paper looked at 59 studies and concluded that, "FTO ...
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585 views

If a gene is located on the X chromosome, does that mean males are never heterozygous for these genes?

As said in the title I am a little confused on the idea of traits located on the sex chromosomes. The example we worked on in class was haemophilia, a recessive trait located on the X chromosome. Does ...
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102 views

What determines whether the maternal or paternal allele is expressed?

I am taking cell biology and have this question: During the process of gene expression, it is possible to express either the maternal allele or the paternal allele. When and how is the determination ...
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209 views

Do mutant alleles result from mutation of the wild type?

The allele that encodes for the most common form of a phenotype in natural population is called a wild type allele and all the rest of the alleles encoding forms other than the wild type are called ...
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Why are published chromosome counts for polyploids often incorrect by an integer multiplication factor of the original diploid like count?

Why are published chromosome counts (done using techniques such as root smashes) for polyploidy flowering plants often incorrect by a multiplication factor of 2 or 3 from the original diploid like ...
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40 views

Can you knockout specific receptors in an adult?

Sorry I don't have a good understanding of this topic, but I'm guessing that "receptor knockout" is related to/a part of "gene knockout"? And If I understand correctly, gene knockout is currently ...
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116 views

Do any dogs have blue iris - not just sclera? [closed]

I was looking in to the question of whether any dogs in fact have "blue eyes"... A quick search gives plenty of information on and images of dogs with blue sclera and black iris. Every "blue-eyed" ...
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373 views

Operators and Enhancers/Silencers

Wikipedia has two images, of a eukaryotic gene and of a prokaryotic gene. They show the difference that the prokaryotic gene also has an operator while the eukaryotic gene does not. Both also have ...
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146 views

Why do humans have 46 chromosomes? [duplicate]

Humans have approximately 25000 genes. Why are these genes on 46 chromosomes? Why not 40 or 50?
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95 views

How could one calculate the gene flow between two populations?

Imagine there are two populations X and Y, and for each population you have the genotypes of each individual in that population (e.g. Aa, AA, aa, etc.), but for multiple loci (e.g. AABb). How could ...
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34 views

Difference Between Gene Delivery and Gene Therapy

What is the specific difference between gene delivery and gene therapy? As far as I understand, gene delivery is the first step of gene therapy, but where does gene delivery end and gene therapy ...
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Known ways to modify the genetic structure of the 13 loci used in CODIS

After reading the answer to Does our DNA change during our lives?, I was wondering if and how it would be possible to change the structure of the 13 loci that are used in the CODIS database, in such a ...
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757 views

Are fishes evolving?

As far as I know, Fishing has been one of the important occupation since early ages, and infinite number of fishes have already been captured. As the time passes, they must've developed some sort of ...
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141 views

Can an argument be made that humans are 90% bacterial?

On the blog, All about Scientist in Microword: Microbiology, I read the post We are 90% bacteria, actually, which says that humans are 90% bacterial cells. If this is the case, then why don't we ...
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85 views

How many genes does D. melanogaster have?

Obviously there is no 100% exact number, but I came across this on flybase, the gold standard for annotation. I am confused now. "Genes located to the genome", is that what I am looking for? If so, ...
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“Signal Advance”: Unsure of meaning or contextual use

I am reading through Recombinant DNA; Genes and Genomes - A Short Course - Third Edition by James D. Watson, et. al. and I came across this paragraph in the discussion about discrete factors of ...
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Microbiome Data

How is it possible to access microbiome data like that found here? I'd like to perform analyses on similar type of data, but cannot find OTU data like that at the Human Biome Project. Thanks for any ...
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Why do we assume that the first humans were dark-skinned?

According to the article Dark skin and blue eyes: How Europeans once looked: It is widely accepted that Man's oldest common forefather was dark skinned, and that people became more pale as they ...
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Colorblindness in females and random X chromosome inactivation

From Annenberg Learner: Because the X is inactivated randomly in cells, one cell could have the maternal X inactivated, while the adjacent cell could have the paternal X inactivated. This causes ...
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583 views

What does it mean to have a Y-DNA Haplogroup “R-M512”? [closed]

I did a DNA test to learn about my origins, but the results are highly technical. I see I have a Y-DNA Haplogroup R-M512 and a mutation (zero marker in DYS448). I Googled these terms and came across ...
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How does plant grafting work?

Plant grafting is a process whereby a piece of one plant is inserted into another and results in a change of the original plant. For example, grafting a piece of a lemon tree into a bitter orange tree ...
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HIV and open reading frames

In Wilk et al. 2001 I saw that HIV has 3 open reading frames. In the Watts et al. 2009, I noticed they mentioned HIV has 9 open reading frames. I don't understand this very well. e.g. ...
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What is the Genetic Cause of Homosexuality? [duplicate]

So, I'm just wondering about this because I read the following in my Biology textbook about fruit fly genes: "Normal male and female flies express distinct forms of the fru gene. When females are ...
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9k views

Is diabetes mellitus a sex-linked disease?

There are two types of diabetes mellitus. a. Type 1 diabetes mellitus b. Type 2 diabetes melliuts Is either of them a sex linked disease? Can either one be inherited? My book says, "this disease is ...
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When performing mutagenesis for an assay, how do you decide on the sample size of individuals to be mutated such that all genes are covered?

If I want to study, say, gustatory response of salmons to a bile acid, I need to mutagenize a sample of salmon males. However, given that there are many genes involved in this response, what is ...
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Can genes change as we age?

Let's say you're a 23 year old man who impregnates a woman. Will your genes be the same if you were to impregnate another woman at age 35? Will your genes in those 12 years have changed/mutated/become-...
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Please explain this disrepancy about ageing

We read that ageing is related to cell death when we run out of telomeres at the end of our DNA molecules. Humans live roughly for 70 years - the traditional three-score years and ten. This compares ...
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131 views

What does it mean to clone a gene?

When I look up information related to the identification of disease genes, texts will often refer to the gene being "first cloned." What does "clone" mean in this context? Is it simply a synonym for ...
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134 views

How was the cama's life expectancy computed?

A cama is a hybrid between a male dromedary camel and a female llama. The first cama was born on January 14, 1998, yet on the Wikipedia page it is said that a cama's life span is 30–40 years. How was ...
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193 views

Why are hybrid offspring mostly sterile? [closed]

Hybrid infertility is a common trait in cross-species offspring. Most are sterile, as they do not produce viable gametes. Examples of this can include Ligers and Mules. Could modern advancement in ...
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52 views

Sexual selection and genotypes [closed]

I have question about genetics and sexual selection. This is re-worded from a problem that was posed to help me and others understand what is going on here. Say you have a fictional species on an ...
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29 views

Why are we supposed as unable to change our intrinsic behaviour? [closed]

People say that habit can be changed but not the intrinsic behavior of an individual. One can control it for a certain period but eternal control or refrain is not possible. Is that true? If yes why?
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Math backbone in biology/genetic

Are there any good books, that shows some advanced models in genetics particularly? The problem is i don't see any good math model in genetics interactions exept combinatorics. I'd like to know what ...
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Amputation of part of the cytoplasm of the amoeba? [closed]

We ampute a part of the cytoplasm of the amoeba many times and we observe that amoeba is not divided This experience allows to deduce the cause of the division of amoeba Do that have relation with ...
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118 views

How often does bacterial transformation happen?

I have been reading: M. Dröge, A. Pühler, W. Selbitschka, "Horizontal gene transfer among bacteria in terrestrial and aquatic habitats as assessed by microcosm and field studies", Biol. Fertil. ...
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genetic complementation problem

I've attached the picture of the problem. SO, based on the information I managed to assemble two large cistrons. (if the combination of two mutants yield (-) mutations are on the same chromosome) A)...
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848 views

What is the instructional language of DNA?

DNA carries most of the genetic instructions used in the development, functioning and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses (Wikipedia). Is it already know how ATCG's sequences ...
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Difference between micro RNA and short-interfering RNA and CRISPR Cas 9 system?

I read this article https://www.quantamagazine.org/20150206-crispr-dna-editor-bacteria/ and am slightly puzzled as to why the CRISPR/Cas 9 system is seen as being so revolutionary. It seems like the ...
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1k views

recombination frequency problem

Three loci C, D and E are located on the same chromosome in this order. We found that the frequency of recombinants between C and D is 10% and that between D and E it is 20%. Assuming that ...
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Why can't this be 1st meiotic division non-disjunction as well?

The child has gotten 2 "sick" chromosomes from his dad and 1 healthy from his mom, leaving it with trisomy 13. I can see how this can happen in the second meiotic division of the father but I can ...
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Gel Electrophoresis

we add Etbr within the agarose gel but we do not add Etbr directly in native PAGE ?when we make agarose gel, we add Etbr before its solidification but we do not add Etbr when the native PAGE gel is in ...
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Coefficient of Inbreeding - implementation issue

The formula for the coefficient of inbreeding is as follows... I have a family tree going back 9 generations. Say I find a common ancestor X in the 4th generation on the mothers side and in the 5th ...