Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
3answers
636 views

Is there variation of AT/CG ratio along species?

Chargaff's rules say that the number of Adenine of the number of Thymine in a genome are equal (nA=nT) and similarly nC=nG. This makes obvious sense knowing that C binds to G and A to T. But what ...
3
votes
1answer
460 views

What hair color will result in someone inheriting both blond and ginger genes?

Both the genes for blond hair and ginger hair are recessive, so they need both parents to give the same gene for it to take affect. What happens when a person has 1 copy of a recessive gene and ...
3
votes
1answer
293 views

Macroevolution vs. microevolution

Where is the line usually drawn between macroevolution and microevolution? I thought that, although similar processes govern both, the line was at the species level, with macroevolution being changes ...
3
votes
1answer
297 views

Possible genotypes for blood types?

If I am blood type B, what are all the possible genotypes that could be expressed by my parents? I think it might be 16 but I was reading online and saw this: Similarly, someone who is blood type ...
3
votes
3answers
229 views

Could a sperm be altered to contain a female's genetics?

while discussing with a friend a while back on the likelihood a Funtari (a woman with both fully developed and functioning sets of genitalia) existing in real life we got into a discussion of weather ...
3
votes
1answer
103 views

How Much Longer For The Gene For Blue Eyes?

In the year 1900 roughly 50% of the people in the United States were homozygous for the gene for blue eyes. By 1950 the number had dropped down to 30%. Just now, (2013) barely 12% of the people living ...
3
votes
1answer
167 views

Number of genes required to sustain life

Are there estimates of the minimum number of genes required to sustain life? In what I mean by life here, I don't include viruses.
3
votes
1answer
139 views

Which part of a female mantises's DNA causes her to be a few times larger than a male mantis?

Which part of a female mantises's DNA causes her to be a few times larger than a male mantis? Do other species have that part of DNA?
3
votes
3answers
151 views

Help explain multi alleles in terms of actual genetic code

I understand that someones genetic makeup at an allele is usually denoted as (AA,Aa,aa). That means that instead of an A-T pair you get a C-G pair on none, 1 or 2 copies. Now, what exactly happens ...
3
votes
1answer
155 views

What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?

What is the most genetically simple organism (except viruses) on this planet? By simple I mean the least number of genes.
3
votes
1answer
187 views

Do genes play a role in the athleticism and shape of a person?

I am an Indian with a small thin stature with some deposition of fat around my belly.I was wondering if genes play a role in fat deposition in the body for Indian, Chinese, European or African people. ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Are Italians genetically separated from other Europeans?

I was reading this Wikipedia article about the genetic history of Italy, and I found it interesting. There are however a few things that puzzle me, because they seem to contradict each other. For ...
3
votes
3answers
574 views

What species have had their genomes sequenced/are being sequenced?

The human genome project released it's first complete genome nearly ten years ago. Since then many species have also been sequenced. I am trying to find a list of completed (and possibly ...
3
votes
3answers
107 views

When can I assume individuals marrying into a pedigree are non-carriers?

If I'm not told that they're non carriers, and if I don't have proof of their geneotype based off of progeny, when can I assume they're non carriers for a trait?
3
votes
2answers
104 views

How common is bacterial mediated transformation? In plants? In animal cells?

The most common method to transform plants is by soaking plant tissue in cultures of agrobacteria (this is not their current classification) which transfer DNA into the plants. Is lateral gene ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

How can GMO contaminate biologic plants?

Let consider two use cases : I am the only farmer within a 200km radius. I first grow GMO plants. A few cycles later I decide to grow bio plants, so I uproot all of the GMO plants and plant fresh ...
3
votes
1answer
47 views

If hermaphrodite C. elegans can reproduce with females?

C. elegans can self fertilize, or they can mate with males. But are they able to mate with females? Or is there some kind of morphological barrier that prevents that?
3
votes
1answer
120 views

XXY (Klinefelter's) & Trisomy 21 & X-inactivation

I read that X-inactivation doesn't tend to happen in males, but then when someone is XXY, they are a male because of the Y. However these individuals tend to live. So does that mean that ...
3
votes
1answer
125 views

Do there exist publicly available Genome sequences of a family?

I would like to explore the genome sequence of a publicly available genome sequences of a family (like mother, father, son, daughter...). If such human genome sequences are not publicly available at ...
3
votes
2answers
145 views

Question about Autosomal Recessive Alleles

I had a homework question that I could not figure out. It states: A woman has cystic fibrosis in her family and did not want to have a child that suffered from the disease. She and her spouse ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Why is Turner syndrome rarer than Klinefelter syndrome?

Turner syndrome occurs in 1-1000 to 1-5000 females, and Klinefelter syndrome occurs in 1-500 to 1-1000 males. Why is Turner so rare even though they both are caused basically by the same mechanism?
3
votes
2answers
180 views

Are these cats calico?

Calico cats are cats that have 3 fur colors and are always female or males two X chromosomes. I've seen many cats that will have 2 fur colors (one of them is usually white) and another, third, color ...
3
votes
2answers
425 views

Detecting Introns and Exons

I know that when RNA is transcribed from the original strand of DNA it contains introns and exons, and that the introns are spliced out of the strand to provide genetic diversity. However, what I ...
3
votes
1answer
292 views

How might gene clusters like the lac operon evolve?

The obvious answer for a gene cluster is gene duplication and mutation of one or both genes. But the genes in the lac operon seem not be so functionally/structurally similar (as compared to the Hox ...
3
votes
2answers
76 views

Microbiome Data

How is it possible to access microbiome data like that found here? I'd like to perform analyses on similar type of data, but cannot find OTU data like that at the Human Biome Project. Thanks for any ...
3
votes
3answers
268 views

Extreme examples of protein translation/use coupling/decoupling?

What are known extreme examples of protein translation/effect coupling/decoupling? For example, examples of proteins that are immediately used at the time the have been translated and vice versa, ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Walk me through microsatellite markers and PCR

Three polymorph microsatellite markers are used to try and narrow down the location of a disease locus, with the use of PCR with 2 flanks on each side of the actual polymorphic area. The PCR ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

How to determine genotype?

In humans, the ability or inability to roll the tongue is a single gene trait. The allele for tongue rolling (R) is dominant to the allele for not being able to roll the tongue (r). Whether ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Do human visual functions degenerate due to genetic factors or by external factors?

Does eyesight primarily deteriorate 'naturally' due to genetics (genomic/epigenomic factors), or due to external factors such as normal wear and tear, or disease? By normal wear and tear I include ...
3
votes
3answers
63 views

sex limited genome transmission

In general, for dioecious species, a large portion of the genome passed from parents to offspring of both sexes - in mammals the X-chromosomes and autosomes are passed from a mother to both daughters ...
3
votes
1answer
343 views

How does chromosome cross-over occur?

I have heard that during meiosis, homologous chromosomes from each parent "cross-over", which enables the off-spring to inherit some alleles from the mother and some alleles from the father. The ...
3
votes
2answers
501 views

How was the Huntington's disease gene's location found?

I read in the book "Why we get sick." by Nesse and Williams that: Steady detective work and fabulous luck have enabled geneticists to pinpoint the Huntington's gene on the short arm of ...
3
votes
2answers
156 views

How does smoking, an environmental factor, cause cancer, fundamentally a genetic disease?

If cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, how might an environmental factor such as smoking cause cancer?
3
votes
1answer
429 views

Negative value on linear gene expression in microarrays

I am starting to use microarrays and maybe this is a dumb question: Using Illumina microarrays, linear gene expression can be negative? Or maybe some artefacts have been introduced? And, in this ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Does a large effective population size result in faster decay of linkage disequilibrium (LD)?

I am thinking about an invasive species that was introduced into North America just a few (<20) generations ago. Using microsatellite genotypes (105 loci), I have identified almost no significant ...
3
votes
1answer
200 views

Precursor miRNA and a mature miRNA

What is the main difference between a precursor miRNA and a mature miRNA? It is often the case that we have more than one precursor miRNA but only one mature miRNA. The miRNA-seq data contains only ...
3
votes
2answers
48 views

Have novel interactions or pathways been predicted by GRN or PPI data and later confirmed by experiment?

I've been learning about the gene regulatory network (GRN) and protein-protein interaction network (PPI) recently. I've found a huge amount of extremely interesting papers about how biological network ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

Gene frequency problem

1/330 of white people in south Africa have a disease called Porphyri. What is the frequency of the gene if it is inherited autosomal recessive? This one I understand. The genotype frequency is $q^2 ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Hardy-Weinberg Color-blind

In a city, 4% of male population have color blindness. How many of the female are (a) color blind carrier, (b) color blind? Suppose the city holds Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. My progress: 4% of male ...
3
votes
2answers
61 views

Can genetically engineering the DNA of a human zygote, make it a twin of another human in entirety?

My question is simple. If I wanted to make an exact twin of an individual, will genetically engineering the DNA of the zygote to match with the individual suffice?
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Looking for a gene in my raw genetic data. What are the possible causes for this?

Obviously, I barely know what I am talking about. But I want to find the "MUC5B promoter polymorphism rs35705950" in my RAW genetic data from 23andMe. (see this ...
3
votes
1answer
47 views

Why are the genomes of some trees so large?

For example, the current longest known genome belongs to a tree: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-largest-genome-ever-sequenced-belongs-to-a-tree I have heard that this could potentially be ...
3
votes
2answers
71 views

Why aren't introns found on the ends of pre-RNA?

We recently learned in genetics class that exons always cap the ends of nascent RNA. I have been trying to figure out the reason why introns can't instead be found on the ends instead of exons. The ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Why do we use DNA sequencing methods such as shotgun?

I am learning about DNA cloning for the first time. What I understand is that, in order to clone DNA, we break-up the original gene into shreds. Then try to piece it back together. Why exactly do we ...
3
votes
2answers
40 views

Heterochromatin production limitations

Currently playing with some ideas for a project and needed some guidance. I am wondering, both in Drosophila melanogaster and in general, is the amount of heterochromatin a cell/nucleus can produce ...
3
votes
1answer
494 views

What is the purpose of back-crossing mice for multiple generations?

Occasionally I will come across articles that refer to back-crossing mice of one strain onto the background other another strain (e.g., C57Bl6). They do not explicitly state the purpose for doing so, ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Mode of inheritance - DYT1 Dystonia

Homozygous DYT1 mutation carriers have not been reported in humans. Does this mean that the mode of inheritance for dystonia (DYT1) is autosomal dominant? This to me implies that if one has both ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the standing genetic variation?

I am reading this review. In the first part, the author introduces Standing Genetic Variation, described as: STANDING GENETIC VARIATION Allelic variation that is currently segregating within a ...
3
votes
3answers
88 views

Publicly available genotype data?

I am a statistician and I'd like to test my new method on biological data. For this I am looking for genotype data for a number of individuals. That is, I am looking for something like this: ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the genetic basis of blood type (ABO) system?

What is the genetic basis of the A/B/B+/O/etc. blood type system? Are there definitive loci that correspond to each or can multiple different genotypes produce the same antigen profile? Also, is the ...