Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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Chromosome 17-Ancestry question

I did the 23andme genotyping and was going over my ancestry. I mostly have ancestors that came from the UK which dominates most of my chromosomes. However, just a little bit (~1.4%) of my DNA is ...
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155 views

Why do almost all SNPs have two alleles?

Reading the Wikipedia page for SNPs I find the sentence "Almost all common SNPs have only two alleles." This is consistent with terminology elsewhere, such as the therm "Minor allele frequency", which ...
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242 views

How much salt [NaCl] is too much in DNA precipitation?

In DNA extractions, how much is too much salt in a CTAB extraction buffer? Protocols hover around 2.5 molar; if you go over this (e.g. 25 molar), will you saturate your solution, and precipitate the ...
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31 views

Fruit Fly Hybrids

I have a food waste bin in which I put fruit scraps. The fruits come from all over the world, mainly Europe though. I'm in the UK. I assume the fruit Fly eggs are already in the fruit, in which ...
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186 views

Math behind the Genetic Relationship Matrix

The genetic relationship matrix (GRM) can estimate the genetic relationship between two individuals (j and k) over m SNPs and i representing a specific SNP. What I dont understand from their ...
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134 views

How can a chromosome translocation in somatic cells lead to disease?

Looking at this picture... ...I get the impression that the part of chromosome is attached to other chromosome, but it is not mutated. When we assume that all genes in the translocated part are ...
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1answer
158 views

Explanation about cytogenetic notation

What is the correct meaning of cytogenetic notation "inv(4)(p13q22)" ? Inversions at chromosome 4, at the p arm 13 is inverted AND at q arm 22 is inverted OR Inversions at chromosome 4, the ...
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126 views

Within and Between Allelic Class Diversity

I am reading Charlesworth et al. 1997. They talk about diversity within and between allelic classes. Nucleotide diversities ($π$) at each neutral site were estimated from the mean of $2 \sum z_t ...
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71 views

What is the C765-Gal4 driver? [closed]

What is a gene driver and what does C765 stand for? Is Gal4 a transcription factor? Source: "Dynamics of Dpp Signaling and Proliferation Control"
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55 views

Are genes uniformly dispersed throughout the genome?

I think that telomeres and centromeres are regions with a very low gene content (= regions that contain few genes). To the exception of telomeres and centromeres, are genes uniformly distributed ...
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38 views

Is it possible to merge the genomes of photosynthesizing and electron-transporting bacteria to make an electric cell?

I had an idea of making electric current from bacteria. There are some bacteria that can photosynthesize, and some others are capable of transmitting electrons through each other. Is it possible that ...
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344 views

How many copies of a gene?

I am studying mathematical models of transcription and translation and I am wondering: In a particular genome, how many copies of a gene coding for one particular protein should one expect? Are they ...
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41 views

How do catenanes form when DNA replicates?

So I am taking a course in DNA replication and repair. And we are talking about catenanes forming when DNA replicates (two circles of dsDNA interlinked) How is this possible?
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43 views

How does the MET gene work and what happens when the promoter region gets mutated?

I am doing research on inherited risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders(ASD) due to common Copy Number Variants(CNVs) One of the mutations is the 'CC' variant of Rs1858830 in the promoter region of the MET ...
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1answer
838 views

Why are nitrogenous bases of DNA hydrophobic if they can hydrogen bond?

Why are nitrogenous bases of DNA hydrophobic if they can hydrogen bond? Is it that they are only relatively hydrophobic? This forum explains it but does not give an example of the structure.
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109 views

Genetic Imprinting and Cell differentiation

It does not seem possible that these two processes can coexist: 1) Genetic imprinting is the phenomenon where genes are expressed differently depending on the parent of origin: 1a. Methylated ...
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236 views

Why are female clones more often produced

As a student of biology when ever I come by artificial cloning, I always find examples of females being cloned - Dolly the sheep, CopyCat, Daisy, etc. The only male I could see was Fibro mouse and a ...
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1answer
65 views

Are dogs affected by dwarfism?

My husband and I noticed a dog today that looked like a smaller version of a purebred Border Collie, although it didn't appear to be a puppy. It made us wonder if other animal species experience ...
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1answer
74 views

Genetic Diversity in Mitochondria

As I was studying for my GRE exam, I was reading on Mitochondria. I then remembered that they undergo replication similar to bacteria. So I googled for info and found on Wikipedia that there is a " ...
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71 views

What happens when a genome is shorter than the other? [closed]

Say there were 2 creatures of the same species. Creature 1 has a longer genome than creature 2, it may be just a few base pairs, but what would happen when the genes were crossed to create creature 3 ...
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108 views

Evolution of the Redundancy of the Genetic Code

In short Looking at the genetic code, it appears that most redundancy is on the third letter rather than on the first or the second letter of the codon. Why has it evolved this way? Longer version ...
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Difference between genetic engineering and synthetic biology

I've recently seen the term synthetic biology being used to describe research involving genetic modification of organisms. What is the difference between synthetic biology and genetic engineering? Is ...
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3answers
80 views

Can a same gene stretch from one chromosome to another separate chromosome?

Can a gene continue on from one chromosome to another separate chromosome? For example, can part of an eye colour gene be on one chromosome and the rest of it be on the next chromosome?
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704 views

Is the discovery of dominant and recessive genes the only reason Mendel matters?

We've known that offspring inherit various traits from their parents since (at least) Aristotle. In The Elements of Plant Hybridization, Gregor Mendel treats that fact as common knowledge. Clearly, we ...
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What are some (bioinformatic) methods to characterize potentially novel gene transcripts?

I am working with a few novel transcripts of genes- before I confirm their existence experimentally, I would like to perform some bioinformatic analysis. I have already considered coding potential, ...
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47 views

How do sex biased genes evolve?

I am wondering how do genes become sex-biased? that is, how does a gene evolve expression which is regulated in a sex-specific manner (assuming no effect from sex-limited Y/W chromosomes). I ...
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3answers
106 views

What fraction of sites are expected to be polymorphic?

Question Consider a very long (eventually infinite) DNA sequence of neutral sites. Consider a panmictic population of constant size $N$ with a per site mutation rate of $\mu$ where all individuals ...
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198 views

How to calculate the percentage of heterozygous cells based on a gene map

I've encountered the following question and am quite stumped by it. A female with genotype AABBCC has been hybridized with a male that has the genotype aabbcc. The first generation (F1) has been ...
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Can a woman possessing 1 mutated allele show attenuated color-vision deficiency?

Women possess two X chromosomes. However, during development, when the embryo has about 32 - 64 cells, one of these chromosomes is randomly inactivated (in each cell) by an lncRNA named Xist. As a ...
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66 views

Color vision across species

Is it true that color vision is sex-linked for all species with binary sexes? Is there an evolutionary significance to the fact that color vision is X-linked in humans? E.g., only female humans can be ...
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2answers
282 views

Why does a gene have two alleles? [closed]

Why does a gene have two alleles? When there is a gene for producing the color pigment for a flower, why are there there two alleles, producing either same color or different color (homozygous and ...
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159 views

Sense and anti sense strand

Why the sense strand is only involved in transcription though the antisense strand just has the compliment strand of the sense strand?
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37 views

DNA dependent RNA polymerase

How does a RNAP locate a specific gene? For instance, growth hormone has to be produced and the RNAP has to locate the gene. But the promoter (TATA box) will also be present infront of all cistrons. ...
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23 views

why not classify organisms based on genetic distance? [duplicate]

When learning about "families of animals" in mid-primary school, my son asked me if there is not a better way to classify animals than by looking at them (they were taught that animals are grouped ...
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55 views

Do genetic modifications exist to enhance the taste of tomatoes?

GM tomatoes seem less tasty. Has there been any research on GMOs with regard to taste? Can scientists introduce a gene to, let's say, tomatoes, which would enhance the flavour? If not, why?
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66 views

Plasmid gene knockout

How do delete a single gene encoded in an operon on a plasmid using E. coli? Could you use the same principle as when knocking out a gene from the bacterial chromosome which is e.g. suicide ...
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76 views

Referencing the homologous chromosomes

There exist a co-ordinate system from chromosomes like "12p11.3". In this system, first integer range from 1 to 23 i.e it takes homologous chromosomes as a pair. If we want to distinguish among ...
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593 views

Do butterflies pass over migration patterns to their offspring?

So, earlier, I read online (http://io9.com/butterflies-remember-a-mountain-that-hasnt-existed-for-509321799) that Monarch butterflies veer east during their southward migration to avoid a mountain ...
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112 views

Cut-off values for LD, LOD and D-prime as algorithmic input

I created an algorithm to generate SNPs for random people of different descents - based on HapMap data. While this works good, there is something else I want to take into consideration. So if a SNP ...
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Efficient algorithm to calculate various population divergence statistics

Intro and description of the data I am simulating the evolution of very long DNA sequences. The model works well, is performant and will output data in the following kind of fasta format ...
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374 views

Theoretically, is domestication of (virtually) any animal possible?

Looking at ones that manage well alongside us human animals, such as dogs and cats, we see that this is possible for evolved, distant animals to have heritable, preferable traits around people. ...
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1answer
44 views

How do I find the sequence of the phage BxB1 gene?

Specifically, I'm trying to find the sequence of BxB1 and its att sites. I have success finding the att site sequences, but I'm having a bit more of an issue with finding the sequence of the actual ...
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303 views

What determines the number of chromosomes an organism carries?

This is an extension of this question about What limits chromosomal length?. I am wondering what could be the specific reasons behind the number of chromosomes an organism carries. In other words, ...
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1k views

Crossing white eyed Drosophila with sepia eye

So, I'm doing some drosophila experiments with my high schoolers and I had really poor production of wild type individuals for doing the experiment resulting in not enough to cross with everyone... I ...
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How is it possible for only one in five children to have brown eyes when their parents both have brown eyes?

I have observed that parents having brown eyes had three female offspring with blue eyes, one son with green eyes, while only the youngest daughter had brown eyes. How can they produce so many ...
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How to be a Noah-esque biopirate and store the genes of every plant and animal [closed]

Preamble. Please criticize this idea. It is too romantic to be possible. All of the news about the sixth extinction got me thinking about it. Thanks The price of DNA sequencing for humans has ...
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Genetic tests on S. cerevisiae to determine mutation locus on genes

I am studying the metabolism of galactose in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After a random mutagenesis screen, several mutant strains were isolated that grow well in glucose but are ...
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1k views

“Same” DNA vs genes

It is often cited that humans share 99% (or 98%) of their DNA with chimpanzees. On the other hand it is stated that siblings share only half of their genes. What (if any) is the difference between ...
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Are there mechanisms that limit the amounts of time conjugation and F-plasmid transfer can happen? If yes, what are they?

Not all bacteria have acquired F-plasmids through conjugation. Some of the mechanisms for this are unsuccesful conjugation events (mechanical disruption), no transfer due to integration in bacterial ...