Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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Why don't the apples seeds from grafted trees produce the same kind of apples?

As Wikipedia says: Grafting is a horticultural technique whereby tissues from one plant are inserted into those of another so that the two sets of vascular tissues may join together. In most ...
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Why do my 23andme results only show me as 8.2% Scandinavian? [closed]

I just got my 23andme results back. My paternal grandfather was full Swedish. Shouldn't that make me 25% Swedish? 23andme tells me I'm only 8.2% Scandinavian. Or maybe my father inherited less than 50%...
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Rates of evolution of mitochondrial genes

I am interested in knowing the rates of evolution of different mitochondrial genes (in base pairs per million years) across different taxa. Has there been any publications along these lines ?
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Genetic mapping problem

A prototrophic Hfr strain of E. coli with the genotype trp+ purB- pyrC+ is conjugated with an F- strain with the genotype trp- purB+ pyrC- . The trp gene is known to enter last. The following numbers ...
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How C. Elegans is used for siliencing genes

The experiment that is using C. Elegans to silence the Genes. I have a question about Why and how C. Elegans can use the DNA plasmid that is generated with the gene of interest in the bacteria by ...
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Do the effect of inbreeding depression disappear after the first generation of outbreeding?

An animal that is the result of generations of inbreeding tends to have lower fitness. (More diseases etc.) This is usually explained by harmful but recessive mutations that exist in all populations, ...
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Chance of passing a risk allele to child?

Our genetics professor has posted up working for previous examination answers, but I am unsure that one of his answers is correct. My answer is close but may just be due to co-incidence. Question: ...
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921 views

Why is an HIV infection considered “incurable”?

My biology teacher told me that if one caught HIV, they cannot be cured because it was near to impossible to be completely virus-free. She said this was because HIV keeps on changing its glycoprotein ...
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Is the SRY gene the sole responsible of biological male sex?

It's very well known that the Y chromosome is what determines maleness, but more specifically this seems to happen thanks to the SRY gene located on it. Some individuals have an XX karyotype, but ...
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meaning of “initial gene constructions” vs. “under the control of plant promoters” in an article on GM plants

From "Risks from GMOs due to Horizontal Gene Transfer", by Paul Keese: Antibiotic resistance genes have been introduced to GM plants either as part of the bacterial cloning vectors used for the ...
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In what way is ADHD genetic? [closed]

According to Psychcentral depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia and autism are traceable to the same inherited genetic variations According to AsapSCIENCE, depression could be genetic due ...
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Why does supercoiled DNA run faster?

The DNA exists in linear and cirular forms. The latter form has interesting feature called Supercoiling. The more number of writhe makes it more supercoiled because of which it gets more compact. ...
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Meaning of “pure” in “pure plant DNA” (horizontally transferred to bacteria in soil conditions)

The abstract of Transformation of Acinetobacter baylyi in non-sterile soil using recombinant plant nuclear DNA, by Simpson et al., 2007: To provide estimates of horizontal gene transfer from ...
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Effect of a doubling of the start codon in a gene

I am learning about frame shift mutations. Frame shifts can occur due to a nucleotide deletion. Suppose that due to a frame shift, because of a deletion somewhere upstream from the original start ...
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Will someone with a double mutation in the allosomes be normal?

Normally a female human has an X allosome from her father and an X allosome form her mother. What if an double mutation happened, which causes that someone has two X allosomes form her mother and no ...
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Chromosome 2 fusion?

I read this article by Jeffrey Tomkins and Jerry Bergman claiming to debunk chromosome 2 fusion. Is there anything wrong with these conclusions? " 1.The reputed fusion site is located in a peri-...
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242 views

DNA adaptation in human life

Does our DNA adapt by human lifetime? Or do we have the same genetic information from birth to death? I mean: What is usually called "evolution" means "natural selection" like this: http://www.youtube....
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how do I find the number of bp in chromosome 3 by knowing number of bp in chromosome 1?

If i have a number of bp in chromosome 1 for example(298,295,559 bp) can I use this number to find the number of bp in chromosome 3.
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“structural and regulatory elements of genes” [closed]

Can anyone please explain a little about these two elements of genes? My main problem is with "which ‘switch on’ instructions". genes have structural elements (which code for a particular protein) ...
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66 views

meaning of “usually greater than 200 base pairs”

From "Risks from GMOs due to Horizontal Gene Transfer", by Paul Keese: Homologous recombination. All cellular organisms have molecular functions dedicated to recognizing and recombining DNA ...
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Why are multiple copies of the 35S enhancer used for overexpression in plants?

I know that the CaMV 35S promoter is widely used for transgenic plants, and I also know that it can be used as an enhancer element for overexpression. I noticed that it is always used as a ...
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120-year-old gene regulation problem independently solved by a computer. How?

My Background: I'm a mathematics graduate student with a physics background. I have a very little biology knowledge and a little knowledge of machine learning and statistics. Topic: I recently ...
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802 views

How do two parents, recessive and dominant genes and two complimentary nucleotides end up in one DNA? [closed]

In the basic school, I was taught that half of genome is received from father and another half comes from mother in the form of double-helix DNA, whose first helix consists of dominant nucleotide ...
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Does one parent transmit more DNA to the offspring than the other one?

Does one parent transmit more DNA to the offspring than the other one? Or do both parents always transmit the same amount of genetic material to their offspring? In other words, can a baby be ...
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If dog's DNA and human's DNA are almost same then can it be said that dogs evolved from humans? [closed]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbY122CSC5w In this video it is said our DNA matches almost the dog's then it can be also said that dogs evolved from humans. Is it?
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Is the fixation rate always equal to the mutation rate for neutral alleles?

Background A classical result of population genetic is that the rate of fixation of netreual alleles is the mutation rate $\mu$. The reason is that each generation $PN_e\mu$ mutations enter the ...
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Splice in with CRISPR/Cas

I need to splice a gene into a human cell genome, with highest rate possible. I mean, doesn't really matter where the gene enters, nor does it matter if some cells die as a result of this. CRISPR ...
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Virus-to-virus gene transfer via “sequences integrated into a common host organism”

From "Risks from GMOs due to Horizontal Gene Transfer", by Paul Keese: In addition to direct HGT between organisms as depicted in Figure 1, forms of indirect HGT have been observed, which involve ...
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Calculating the recombination factor of four point genetic cross?

So, I'm trying to work out the recombination factor (RF) from this set of data: Which shows the 16 phenotypes of progeny of a cross of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. I know how to go about a three ...
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153 views

How do eukaryotes terminate transcription? (clarification on Campbell Biology)

I'm having trouble understanding how eukaryotes terminate transcription. Studying Campbell Biology (pg. 342, 10th ed.), I read: In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II transcribes the polyadenylation ...
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How to interpret the simple sequence repeat (SSR) on the coding sequence, but not the related protein sequence?

I have predicted some SSR repeat on the gene of interest using SSRLocator program, which the result creates a question for me. Please consider the below sequence, which is part of gene sequence of ...
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144 views

Layman definition of genetic polymorphism?

I am reading an article about Genetic Polymorphism and there are lines in the article about genetic polymophism that I don't quite understand like. In this area, there are six different chemotypes ...
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How does intron retention make the alternative transcript non-coding?

I faced with a non-coding transcript that specified as one the isoform of BIN1. It sounds that this isoform generated as a result of alternative splicing with a intron retained; am I right? However, ...
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Disease causing variants and Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

Is it true that many disease causing variants/mutations do not follow Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium? If so, then please elaborate on why this may be true (or not) and provide examples. I am interested ...
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What's the aim of genetically modifying of foods/organisms?

On news, articles etc. experts talking about Genetically Modified Foods and Organisms often mentions about their disadvantages like, their potential to harm human health allergies may become more ...
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Are Italians genetically separated from other Europeans?

I was reading this Wikipedia article about the genetic history of Italy, and I found it interesting. There are however a few things that puzzle me, because they seem to contradict each other. For ...
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Plasmid copy number and Rop protein

If i want to transform a bacteria (E. coli) with a particular plasmid (in my case pBR322) will the presence of the Rop gene affect the production of it ? Is it desirable to use a plasmid without that ...
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Do transposons usually jump from one chromosome to another?

If it is usual occurrence, does it mean that my one gene can change its location from one chromosome to another?
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Catenation and decatenation by DNA Gyrase

Decatenation is done for the replication of DNA and why is Catenation done and is it related to Crossing over
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Heterochromatin v Euchromatin. Which is more abundant?

So I was just reading that whether heterochromatin or euchromatin is more abundant in a particular human cell depends on how active that cell is. But considering that most of the 25,000 or so genes in ...
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Genetics of epilepsy

Is epilepsy genetically inheritable? If yes, is it dominant?
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Recombination fraction( frequency) in Homozygotes

I have a question about the recombination frequency I hope you have time to answer. Background: If we look at homozygous individual A/A B/B which has been formed from the gametes AB and AB, this ...
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gene duplicated on genome but is different

I've been looking at a miRNA cluster on a genome and I found it three times. The first two are right next to each other and look exactly the same, the third sequences is on a different scaffold of the ...
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Can the third sex be categorized as Male or Female?

Hijra are people who have a penis (not sure if sexually active) but look much like a female (perhaps for some feminine biological property). Wikipedia says they are "physiological males who have ...
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It's right to say coding sequence is part of exon sequence?

Some basic ambiguities making me confused. I downloaded 5'UTR, CDS, 3'UTR, and exon sequences, separately from Biomart for a gene P4HA2 (Homo sapiens) and found some simple sequence repeat (SSR) on ...
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IBD-value in pedigree with inbreeding

I have a question about IBD. Please see the figure below. How many pairs of alleles are IBD for X and Y, or what is the IBD value for X and Y. Is it four (4)? I have seen it to be maximally 2, but ...
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Why does all life use the same macromolecules in their genetic code?

There is no biochemical constraint of any sort, so why doesn't some other code work? Why is it specifically RNA/DNA?
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In human females one X chromosome is inactivated forming Barr Body. Then How exactly Haemophilia is dominant? check description for details

Suppose a female has one X chromosome normal and one chromosome with Haemophilic gene. Now suppose if the X chromosome which is normal is inactivated will the female show haemophilia?
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Overcoming Inbreeding Depression

When inbreeding depression occurs, a genetically unrelated individual is mated with the animal to introduce genetic variability and remove homozygosity. In this case either outbreeding or ...
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In which phenomena does one gene pair hide the effect of other unit?

This question was asken in an exam, The answer they are saying is "Epistasis". But I think "Dominance" fits better, because it is not mentioned whether genes of same allele are to be considered or ...