The study of genomes, the entire hereditary information of an organism.

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How does high-fidelity of DNA replication depend on the formation of hydrogen bonds?

Replication has an error rate of less than 1 in 100 million. DNA polymerase forms H-bond with the H-bond acceptor atoms in the minor groove. <-- enhance fidelity here? Binding of the triphosphate ...
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26 views

Exon skipping in mammals

I've heard from several sources that the predominant form of alternative splicing (at least in mammals) is exon skipping. However, my personal evidence is only anecdotal: I've heard it and read it, ...
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31 views

Is there an association between environmental and mutational robustness?

The robustness of a genotype is the ability of this genotype to resist (always produce the same phenotype) to various parameters such as mutations and environment. The ability of a genotype to resist ...
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Where can I upload non-human Genotype data?

I have genotype data from few chicken population and I want to (need to) upload them somewhere online with free access. I have searched the web but I haven't found any place for non-human genotype ...
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41 views

How can I download a gene sequence from GenBank (NCBI)? [closed]

Could you tell me the steps to find and download a gene sequence from GeneBank? I would appreciate your help.
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325 views

What's the longest transcript known?

What's the longest functional transcript known? I'm wondering about RNA length post splicing, so not including introns.
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Genome-wide methylation analysis: sources of technical error?

We are doing a genome-wide analysis of methylation via bisulfite sequencing for an insect species. Previous experimental techniques have suggested the presence of methylation in this organism, ...
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59 views

Are recessive, deleterious alleles less common on the X chromosome than the autosomes in humans?

As there is a potential for them to be more readily purged in hemizygous males (and in cell lineages in females with the deleterious-allele-bearing chromosome activated), I would expect the frequency ...
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Assembly reconciliation

We have some bacterial genomes that were assembled using Spades, they were sequenced with and IonTorrent PGM. There are many assemblers and they give different results. I was interested in a tool ...
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79 views

Why extract DNA from certain white blood cells instead of whole blood?

In my lab, human DNA is extracted from whole-blood samples. I don't actually do the extractions and I am not familiar with the specific protocol but I understand that platelets and red blood cells ...
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187 views

What if a Point Mutation is seen in only half the coverage for its location?

I've been looking at some sequenced exomes and found an interesting point mutation that causes a Proline-to-Leucine amino acid change in the protein. This seems like it could have a big impact on the ...
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79 views

Sequence alignment scoring

The following table is from Deonier's text Computational Gene Analysis at p. 152. This is an exercise in global sequence alignment and scoring of alternative sequences. The text proposed a solution ...
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How many different protein coding genes are in the Human Biome?

There are approximately 20k protein-coding genes found in the human genome. This number is presumably very small when considering all the genomes found in the diverse microbes associated with the ...
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47 views

What is the close and related genome used for in Gene models?

all I am a little bit confused about using the related genome or reference genome. When we have a reference genome, we can do alignment. Also we can do the assembly. Can you give some more reason ...
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69 views

Databases for metabolic pathways of human disease

Which databases contain the metabolic pathway of human diseases? I have searched Metacyc and KEGG but didn't find the appropriate metabolic pathway.
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55 views

How many recombination events are there per generation in humans?

I'm looking for a reference that tells me how many recombenation events occur in humans from one generation to the next. Assuming that the human genome is a 3.3 GigaBases long DNA sequence, how many ...
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131 views

What is the potential function of ultra-conserved elements in the genome?

If selection pressure results in conservation of DNA sequences, what is the most plausible explanation for the existence of ultra-conserved elements (refs here and here) given that there hasn't been ...
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58 views

In genome research, what is the problem in Mapping that may be caused by reads being too short?

In the following scenario: You were given short sequence reads of plant RNA obtained from a next-generation sequencing machine (fragments of 20–30 nucleotides in length). You attempt to map them back ...
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24 views

“Gold standard” for CNV detection methods?

Is there a generally accepted "gold standard" for testing the performance of CNV detection methods? I'm interested both in learning about existing datasets that may serve as gold standards for CNV ...
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3answers
66 views

Publicly available genotype data?

I am a statistician and I'd like to test my new method on biological data. For this I am looking for genotype data for a number of individuals. That is, I am looking for something like this: ...
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76 views

How were the first primers made

I keep reading about how primers are useful in pcr -- they allow you to select a specific dna region. Similarly, in NGS or Sanger sequencing they give you a starting point. The primers I see are about ...
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2answers
66 views

How does the telomere repeat sequence vary in Eukaryotes?

Question: How does the telomeric repeating sequence vary in non-vertebrate Eukaryotes? If you know the repeating sequence of a given species I would appreciate hearing it. Background: Telomerase is ...
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39 views

Omics integration questions [closed]

Let's say that I have a population of Mus musculus in the lab. I divide it in a control group and a test group. The test group is constantly subjected to a stress (example: elevated UV radiation). ...
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1answer
69 views

Systems Biology of triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis in Jatropha

I need the genetic regulatory network of TAG synthesis (Kennedy pathway) of Jatropha plant?? Or is there any way to convert metabolic pathway into genetic regulatory network?
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83 views

what does sequences overlap indicate

what does it mean if different protein sequences overlap upon multiple alignment, are they the same, do they have a common ancestor, are they recombinants of each other and how does one go on to ...
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1answer
31 views

What is the genetic distance where linkage can be ignored?

I heard several times that two SNPs, that have at least 1'000 nucleotides between them, can be seen as 'unlinked' due to frequent recombination events. I also once saw a paper showing a graph "degree ...
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39 views

What is splice junction pairs?

Splicing is a modification of pre mRNA when all introns are removed and exons are joined. What is a splice junction pair? It is two exons which connected together?
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Referencing the homologous chromosomes

There exist a co-ordinate system from chromosomes like "12p11.3". In this system, first integer range from 1 to 23 i.e it takes homologous chromosomes as a pair. If we want to distinguish among ...
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Need help distinguishing between a primary and secondary source

I am trying to figure out if the following article is a primary or secondary source. I'm leaning towards secondary but here are my cases for both. Primary: Published in a peer-reviewed ...
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81 views

Reference sequence for defining single nucleotide polymorphisms

Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or genetic variation in general, by definition are relative to a reference sequence. When we talk about databases of SNP as in ("dbSNP—Database for Single ...
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Predicting host-pathogen gene interaction networks

Background What we have are: ~20 genome sequences for a host species that come with gene annotations Several sequenced genomes for parasite/pathogens of these hosts Question What are the ...
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What are the limitations to current nucleotide sequencing technologies?

Using the Illumina platform, it is cheap and (relatively) easy to sequence huge amounts of DNA or RNA. There are various other platforms out there (Roche/454, SOLiD, PacBio, Ion Torrent) each with ...
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Regulation of the replication of mtDNA at embryonic level

While reading an article on mitochondrial inheritance I came across this link. The results state that mitochondrial DNA replication is regulated in different cells of an embryo at different levels. ...
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Paired-end mapping exercise

Pair-end mapping (PEM) is a technique that allows to detect structural variants in DNA by obtaining paired-end reads and the comparison of their positions in a reference genome. Then among libraries ...
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1answer
58 views

bioinformatics /genomics [closed]

i am looking for likely truncation sites to prove recombination in sequences. i have 4 sequences. i believe one to be the "real sequence" and the other 3 to be recombinants caused by cleavage possibly ...
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1answer
132 views

What about 23andMe's SNP test gives it such bad efficacy as a diagnostic tool?

The recent news about the FDA stopping the google backed 23andMe service selling any more kits got me thinking. I understand the company may have been selling it as a medical tool prematurely, but ...
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DNA and gene activation

As far as the genetic content of each cell is concerned I have read to my satisfaction that all cells of a person's body except the red blood cells (with no nucleus and so no genetic message) and the ...
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Difference between CDS and cDNA

What is the difference between Coding Sequences (CDS) and cDNA? Are Coding sequences the sequences that is transcribed to mRNA and cDNA in contrast DNA obtained by reverse polymerization of matured ...
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125 views

Why only heterogeneous SNVs for validation using genotyping arrays?

I am trying to validate the variants I found using whole genome sequencing . The standard practice, I have seen in the two publications below were to check for the number of heterozygous SNPs called ...
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1answer
735 views

What does conditional analysis of a SNP in a GWA study entail?

I am familiar with the use of tag-SNPs in genome-wide association studies to identify gene loci involved in complex traits, but I keep seeing the term "conditional analysis" used without any ...
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153 views

Accuracy of a particular genetics test

I am a newbie in biology and I am simply trying to discover the field of genomics. Consider the question - Are genetic tests accurate? I don't believe they are as the genes may not provide the ...
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231 views

Variations in Genome Sizes

Why is there wide variation in genome size amongst groups of protists, insects, amphibians and plants, but less variation within groups of mammals and reptiles?
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243 views

Number of introns in a genome

Humans have approximately 21000 genes but they probably make more proteins than that. This has been explained by many mechanisms like alternative RNA splicing. My question is - If what we call as ...
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212 views

Amount of Heterozygosity

How many loci in the human genome are heterozygous? How about other species? EDIT: I was wondering, considering for example the whole world population, how many of the human genes actually have two ...
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142 views

What are the limiting factors for gene length and number of exons?

I recently downloaded gene annotations for Homo sapiens from Ensembl for some bioinformatic analysis. The vast majority of the gene annotations have 20 exons or less, although there are some that have ...
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1answer
143 views

Inheritance of Huntington's disease

People with Huntington's disease have HTT genes with more than 37 copies of CAG repeat. The risk of extra copies being generated is higher during sperm formation than during ovum formation. Why is it ...
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1answer
134 views

Which part of a female mantises's DNA causes her to be a few times larger than a male mantis?

Which part of a female mantises's DNA causes her to be a few times larger than a male mantis? Do other species have that part of DNA?
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482 views

Why did high A+T content create problems for the Plasmodium falciparum genome project?

The main paper for the Plasmodium palciparum genome project (Gardner et al., 2002) repeatedly mentioned that the unusually high A+T content (~80%) of the genome caused problems. For example they imply ...
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Effect of single-gene overexpression in the cell's response

Which are the factors that modify the overall gene differential expression by introducing a vector for single-gene overexpression? If you overexpress a gene for a protein involved in signal ...