The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

0
votes
1answer
14 views

Diffusion coefficient of cells in blood?

What's the diffusion coefficient of white cells in blood? Is it well defined, or are cells too large and few as to be treated as particles in this context? PD: I have tried to look this up, but what ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Hematopoietic System Kinetics [on hold]

I am looking for some help finding reference(s) showing cell turnover rates in the hematopoietic system. Including how long a given cell type like granulocytes would be expected to exist in peripheral ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

What are all the different methods of fixation for white blood cells? [closed]

I am doing an optical experiment on blood cells and wanted to investigate how various fixatives affected the optical properties of white blood cells. Can anyone help me compile a list of candidate ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

How does protein enter bloodstream?

If a hemophiliac patient injects his factor 8 through the veins directly into the bloodstream to provide the body with clotting factor... Why don't they just make the drug as a pill and have the liver ...
2
votes
0answers
23 views

Blood sampling at home

I want to collect small blood samples at regular intervals (e.g. every 8 hours or more often) over a longer period (weeks to months). To avoid having to go to a lab or doctor to have this done, I want ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Who and when was the first human diagnosed with hemophilia, or considered a carrier?

The earliest case I can find is Queen Victoria of England, who ruled from 1837-1901. Is this the first hemophilia case on record?
7
votes
1answer
293 views

What will happen if a foetus is Rh- and the mother is Rh+?

If a mother has Rh-negative blood and her foetus has Rh-positive blood it will result in rhesus incompatibility and lead to erythroblastosis fetalis. What will happen if the reverse occurs, when a ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Number of LT-HSCs in mice and humans

I am looking for the number of long term hematopoietic stem cells in both humans and mice if somebody has references for these two numbers. I have very old estimates, but I would like something much ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

How much is local blood non-Newtonian in Pathophysiology?

I am studying the Barus effect / Merrington effect / die swell / extrudate swell, which is a characteristic of non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquids (Introduction to the phenomenon in this video) i.e. ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Could drugs promoting angiogenesis be used as a treatment for burn victims?

From what I've learned from my textbooks and in class lecutures it seems that inducing angiogenesis for people with severe burns would be an excellent way to speed up the healing process. Is this ...
2
votes
2answers
66 views

Blood draw from the elderly or those with tiny veins

A lot of people have very small veins making it next to impossible to draw blood. Would a nitroglycerin tablet (or some other vasodilator) before drawing blood help to enlarge veins?
1
vote
2answers
54 views

Are erythrocytes lysed during alpha hemolysis?

Wikipedia says: When alpha hemolysis (α-hemolysis) is present, the agar under the colony is dark and greenish. Streptococcus pneumoniae and a group of oral streptococci (Streptococcus viridans or ...
2
votes
0answers
42 views

Proteases in the blood

I’m reading on hormones and the book talks about how peptide or amine hormones are easily broken down by proteases present in the blood plasma. This has led me to question the interactions between ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

What is the difference between Amino acids from blood and urine?

I would like to understand the difference between different tests for Amino Acids. Any blood laboratory offers amino acids tests using 3-4 methods Blood serum Urine Random Urine 24 hour (all the ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

What happens to blood after a person dies?

After a human dies, what happens to their blood? I know that it tends to accumulate in the lower areas of the body, whichever parts are closest to the ground, but I am wondering about coagulation. ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Wheatgrass in thalassaemia

In local newspapers there was a not so recent story about wheatgrass juice being "curative" in thalassaemia. Although I do not take the article at face value, it would be enlightening to know if there ...
3
votes
2answers
549 views

What magnification do I need to see blood cells?

If I want to buy a microscope for my kids to be able to view single celled creatures and blood cells, about what magnification is required? A Celestron Pentaview digital scope claims up to 600×. Is ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

What Effect Does Skin Redness Have On Underlying Tissue?

When someone applies a rubefacient ( something that increases blood flow to the skin, turning it red), what effect does this have on the underlying tissue? Is blood supply increased radially from ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Evolution of blood types [duplicate]

What are the popular theories regarding how our blood divided into 4 groups. Particularly I'm interested in whether this was originally linked to disease. Thanks for your answers, useful articles and ...
4
votes
1answer
119 views

Blood after death

After the heart stops beating, do the red and white blood cells and the other cellular elements in the blood become non-functional immediately? Or does it take time? Would clotting occur after death? ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

White blood cell transfusion

Some patient who have low White blood cells need WBC Transfusion do resist infections. What is interesting, doesn't transfused WBCs cause temporary autoimmune disease ? Like recognising patients ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Proteins and Blood Acidification

Is there evidence to suggest that excessive consumption of Whey, or similar proteins will lead to acidification of the blood?
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Cis-AB phenotype verification

I know that my blood type is AB. I wanted to know if I am cis-AB since cis-AB seems to have a different approach in blood transfusion. Is there a lab test that can verify is a person is under cis-AB ...
1
vote
2answers
20 views

What are blood group determinants? [closed]

I am trying to understand if they are the same as the blood antigens. The books I have tried to read say something about them being the antigens on the surface of the red blood cell.
5
votes
1answer
152 views

Lack of A/B-antigen equivalent to Rhesus disease

Rhesus disease occurs when an Rh- mother is exposed to Rh antigens (often due to blood contact with an Rh+ child during delivery) and mounts an immune response which eventually results in the ...
3
votes
2answers
448 views

Bernoulli’s Principle in the Cardiovascular System

Below are graphs which illustrate the cross-sectional area, velocity, and fluid pressure through each vascular segment of the cardiovascular system. It makes sense that velocity and cross-sectional ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Saline solution for animals

A popular "well-known fact" is that all creatures on Earth consist mostly of water (i.e. H2O). Indeed, a liquid called "normal saline solution" is just a solution of 0.9% sodium chloride in distilled ...
3
votes
0answers
44 views

Do High Triglycerides Invalidate Tests for Infections?

Blood donation websites tell you to avoid eating fats a few days before the donation, because when there is a lot of fat in the blood, they can't test for infectious diseases and must discard the ...
5
votes
1answer
80 views

Parents are Rh +ve and child Rh -ve

Suppose the two parents of a child have blood groups A+ve and O+ve, and the child has O-ve type. For blood group, there are two alleles. Since the child has O, the father must have one 'A' allele and ...
3
votes
1answer
39 views

Why is the administration of exogenous Anti-D not harmful to the foetus?

Haemolytic disease of the newborn can result from Rhesus incompatibility in utero. In this disease a Rh-ve mother becomes exposed to the antigens of a Rh+ve foetus by fetomaternal haemorrhage causing ...
1
vote
0answers
494 views

What's the difference between blood value units 'mE/l', 'mU/l', 'mIU/l' and 'mEq/l'?

Wikipedia suggests 'mE/l' is the dutch or german translation (using 'eenheid'/'einheit' for 'unit') for 'mU/l', which can also be written as 'mIU/l'. The article mentions ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is a significant drop in blood pressure?

I have done a (high school) science experiment to try to study the affects of holding a rabbit on blood pressure and heart rate and found systolic blood pressure dropped an average of 9.2% and ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Do High Iron Stores (but within the healthy range) Make Sun Exposure Damage Worse?

Ultraviolet damage from sun exposure is related to the creation of free radicals. Iron is often involved in exacerbating damage by free radicals. Having lower iron stores is associated with reduced ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

Does blood typing still provide a use for ancient tissue analysis?

Modern techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing has become extremely cheap. This, compounded by the ability to PCR miniscule samples to viable samples for analysis, means that aDNA can be ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

White blood: cells concentration

Anyone knows of a table with average concentration that can be found in white blood? Something like: Neutrophils - 80% Mast cells - ?% Dendritic cells - ?% B cells - ?% Helper T cells - ?% Killer ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Some kind of better oxygen-transport protein or something… Can you help me find it?

I remember reading about artificial or man-made, oxygen-transport protein that is somehow an improvement on hemoglobin, and that it is possibly immune to sickle-cell anemia, or something... But I ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Consuming animals by slaughtering vs injecting barbiturates?

In "Least painful way to die" we get an answer ... Companion animals (e.g., dogs and cats): injected barbiturates are recommended Laboratory animals (e.g., mice and rats): injected ...
3
votes
1answer
125 views

Any evolutionary explanation for human blood groups?

What is the explanation of people having blood types from an evolutionary perspective?
9
votes
2answers
4k views

Is blood an organ according to biology?

It consist approximately 7 percent of body weight. By definition organ is composed of multiple tissues. Blood is a fluid, a circulating tissue. Therefore can we call this fluid system a liquid ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Can leukopenia in a person with an otherwise normal immune system lead to non-infectious diseases in the long-term?

If a person has developed leukopenia as a side-effect of long-term use of anti-convulsant medications and his/her immune system appears normal otherwise (does not get infections any more often than a ...
1
vote
1answer
203 views

How does the body respond to blood donation; are there any possible risks?

Can blood donation cause any harm to the donor? I have been told so, but cannot find any references supporting this claim. I have also learned that our body will replace the lost fluids within 24 ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Possible genotypes for blood types?

If I am blood type B, what are all the possible genotypes that could be expressed by my parents? I think it might be 16 but I was reading online and saw this: Similarly, someone who is blood type ...
10
votes
1answer
824 views

Where is the aneurysm in this picture?

I'm a curious person, I've never had any medical training, but I wish to know some more about aneurysms. Aneurysms are basically weakened spots in the elastic artery wall. This can eventually result ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

How to gauge the clinical significance of specific cell type presence?

How does one decide whether the presence of certain cell types is clinically important or negligible? Would the presence of certain cells in conjunction with other symptoms be enough, or should it be ...
7
votes
2answers
323 views

Do other animals have different blood types?

Humans have the ABO and Rhesus blood typing systems. I have two questions about it: Why have we evolved these blood types? Do other animals have different blood types as well?
3
votes
1answer
72 views

In which of the following diseases structure of haemoglobin produced is normal but their amount reduced?

The options provided are- Chronic blood loss Sickle cell anaemia Haemolytic anaemia Thallasaemia Transfusion reactions - *Q-15: pg-785; **Review of Medical Physiology - William F. ...
3
votes
1answer
186 views

How do genetic chimeras with different blood types not die?

If a person is a chimera and has two different blood types in his veins, how does he not die? Shouldn't the immune system attack one of the blood types? In 1953 a human chimera was reported in the ...
1
vote
2answers
501 views

Should hydrogen peroxide be applied on a bloody nose? [closed]

When I was a kid, my parents taught me to apply hydrogen peroxide on my nose whenever it bled. It's a rare event, but my nose bleeds from time to time, and when it does, I always go through the same ...
3
votes
1answer
139 views

How does Hemocytoblast constantly get formed into so many blood cells and yet remains there in the bone marrow throughout the lifetime?

I mean, Hemocytoblast is a stem cell which is constantly being differentiated into daughter cells and leads to formation of all the blood cells (having short and limited life spans), so how come those ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

How does so many replicas of different kinds of blood corpuscles form from different cells in the bone marrow? [closed]

I am interested in the process by which so many identical blood corpuscles form from an entirely different cell (within the bone marrow) altogether. How does these cells form?