The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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How do genetic chimeras with different blood types not die?

If a person is a chimera and has two different blood types in his veins, how does he not die? Shouldn't the immune system attack one of the blood types? In 1953 a human chimera was reported in the ...
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64 views

Should hydrogen peroxide be applied on a bloody nose? [closed]

When I was a kid, my parents taught me to apply hydrogen peroxide on my nose whenever it bled. It's a rare event, but my nose bleeds from time to time, and when it does, I always go through the same ...
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26 views

How does Hemocytoblast constantly get formed into so many blood cells and yet remains there in the bone marrow throughout the lifetime?

I mean, Hemocytoblast is a stem cell which is constantly being differentiated into daughter cells and leads to formation of all the blood cells (having short and limited life spans), so how come those ...
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14 views

How does so many replicas of different kinds of blood corpuscles form from different cells in the bone marrow? [closed]

I am interested in the process by which so many identical blood corpuscles form from an entirely different cell (within the bone marrow) altogether. How does these cells form?
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40 views

How does a baby retain a blood group different from it's mother, in her womb?

It's a well-established fact that blood group is decided by genotype. But, when a new child starts it's journey in the womb, then the mother's blood (along with it's agglutinins and agglutinogens) ...
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22 views

Time lapse between fresh blood's exposure to air and that same blood turning darker red-brown [closed]

Using the example of a smear of blood from a cut on the arm (as when a person attempts to wipe away the blood), does anyone have a general idea of how much time it takes for that smear of blood to ...
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1answer
60 views

Why oxLDL accumulate to form foam cells?

In atherosclerosis, why macrophage store all the cholesterol from oxLDL inside, and turns to foam cell, and not just degrade it and going back to blood? (there are some amount that leave the plaque, ...
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42 views

How do you determine if donated, stored blood is viable?

Think about stored donated blood; What should we check before transfusing it to a patient, to see if blood is still viable? What methods to use? What components should it have in what levels, to be ...
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31 views

What are the advantages of blood's redness? [closed]

Although this page (http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/evo101/IIIE5aNotadaptation.shtml) denounces the idea that blood's redness is not an adaptation, I remain inquisitive on the matter since no ...
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Why draw blood from veins rather than arteries?

Why draw blood from veins rather than arteries? Is it more convenient or safer?
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30 views

How is oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange mediated by hemoglobin? [closed]

Oxygen is transferred by hemoglobin from the lungs to tissues, while carbon dioxide is transferred by hemoglobin from tissues to lungs. How is this regulated bidirectional transfer mediated?
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119 views

Why do men have a higher hematocrit (red blood cell count) than women?

The hematocrit, also known as packed cell volume (PCV) or erythrocyte volume fraction (EVF), is the volume percentage (%) of red blood cells in blood. It is normally 45% for men and 40% for women. ...
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97 views

Besides hemoglobin, what proteins are present in red blood cells?

I knew that mature red blood cells (RBCs) lacked nuclei, but I wasn't aware until just now that they also lacked ribosomes and mitochondria. Most cells in the human body all contain a common laundry ...
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73 views

Blood cells penetration

Is there a type of blood cell that can reach all other body cells? By "reach", I mean to "touch" the surface of the target cell. If we look at the red blood cell for example, that moves in blood ...
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73 views

How do CO₂ and carbonic acid (H₂CO₃) work in buffering the blood?

Been struggling with this for the past few days even after reading half of the acid base tutorial here, if someone could help me that'd be great. What I don't understand is how HCO3- is supposed to ...
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36 views

What is phenotyping of blood during transfusion process?

Thallaesemic patients are advised to have only "phenotypically matched blood".I mean the transfusion problems arise mainly due to "grouping problems" like mismatch b/w ABO & Rh+/- so what do this ...
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449 views

Theranos blood test's Specificity and Accuracy?

I am studying the limitations of Theranos device. They have 238 documents in Google Patents Search (Inassignee as Theranos), here. Which patents are relevant for their device? They have 70 tests ...
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1answer
39 views

What are the features on a microscope one needs in order to do lab work?

By lab work I mean urinalysis, blood work(live as well), fecals, cytologies, histologies and all other. I have read(partly) a book(from 2002) on lab diagnostics and the author did not mention ...
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116 views

How to translate a blood type used in Eastern Europe?

What are the I-IV blood type descriptions shown below (commonly used in Eastern Europe), and how do you translate them into the ABO-system?
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70 views

Can one use a hemocytometer on a compound upright microscope?

I'm posting this as a follow-up on What to look for when buying a light microscope?. The answerer states that you would need to use a an inverted microscope to count cell in the hemocytometer(counting ...
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27 views

Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
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294 views

Fate of erythrocytes after splenectomy

The spleen is considered a graveyard for red blood cells. So in case of Splenectomy (complete surgical removal of the spleen), what would be the fate of red blood cells? Would this cause Polycythemia? ...
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1k views

Why do we need red blood cells?

From what I know, the main function of red blood cells is hemoglobin transport. So, why do we need cells packed with hemoglobin: why can't it travel freely in the bloodstream? My own thoughts were: ...
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377 views

What happens when you mix type A with type B blood (and v.v)

What happens when you mix different blood types that are not compatible? For example, if a patient has type A blood and receives type B blood, or v.v.?
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What percent of your blood can you lose before you need a transfusion

Losing a little blood is okay. If your a normal healthy person, and got into an accident, how do they know if you need a transfusion or if you'll be okay? This is hypothetical.
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971 views

What is this microscopic image from Peter Gabriel's New Blood album cover?

This image appears on the cover of Peter Gabriel's album New Blood. It appears to be a photograph of some microscopic biological cell. But it doesn't look like a blood cell to me. What kind of ...
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943 views

What is the difference between regular blood, a woman's and a virgin's menstrual blood?

There are many stories that blood contains the life-force energy and specifically menstrual (period) blood has always been a feature of many rituals and some ancient Sumerian tablets mentioned that ...
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60 views

Why ml scale blood retrieval is required to run a blood test?

Substances found in blood are present at microscopic scale and tend to be invisible to the unaided eye. Why is a whole vial of blood (at ml scale) is required to assess the presence and concentration ...
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449 views

Why extract DNA from certain white blood cells instead of whole blood?

In my lab, human DNA is extracted from whole-blood samples. I don't actually do the extractions and I am not familiar with the specific protocol but I understand that platelets and red blood cells ...
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1answer
524 views

why does blood when oxidized over time become bluish green?

Oxygenated blood is bright red and deoxygenated blood is dark red or brown. If you take oxygenated blood and leave it in the air it will turn dark red, then brown, then finally a bluish green from ...
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2answers
408 views

Do females living on mountains have more RBCs than a normal male [closed]

I got this doubt when I was studying about haematocrit value. According to my NCERT textbook males have greater number of RBCs than females. But who will have more RBCs when comparing a normal male ...
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1answer
526 views

Carbon Monoxide and High-Oxygen-Affinity Varieties of Hemoglobin

I recently learned about the concept of "affinity" in regards to hemoglobin. For hemoglobin in humans, carbon dioxide has a lower affinity than oxygen, which allows gas exchange to occur in our lungs. ...
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43 views

Can lymph be in peripheral blood?

I read an argument that 1-3% of lymph is in peripheral blood. However, I am not sure if this lymph is about lymphocytes in peripheral blood; not lymph itself. Lymph gets exchanged between capillaries ...
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35 views

Plateletpheresis for hemophilia

Plateletpheresis is seperation of platelets from whole blood and putting the leukocytes and erythrocytes back into the blood. If the person donating platelets does not have hemophilia than could a ...
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76 views

Blood consumption

Is consumption of blood more "dangerous" compared to meat? There was a news-article about unnatural chemicals found in the blood of mothers. This reminded me about a question I have pondered upon ...
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107 views

Blood Type Compatibility [closed]

It should be that because O+ blood(which is my blood type) has all antibodies but no antigens that all other blood types including O- would be incompatible making O not a universal donor so why is O ...
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1answer
38 views

Protoporphyrinogen (IX) formation in heme synthesis

This picture shows one of the steps of heme synthesis. In this step two propanoate groups of coproporphyrinogen III are decarboxylated to form protoporphyrinogen IX. The enzyme that catalyses this ...
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955 views

Why does hemoglobin's affinity for oxygen increase if an organism lives at a higher elevation where oxygen is lower?

Wouldn't its affinity for oxygen decrease because the acidity of the body would increase with the lack of oxygen? The textbook said otherwise though and I don't understand.
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302 views

Why are red blood cells considered to be cells?

Wikipedia states that a cell is the basic structural, functional and biological unit of all known living organisms. Cells are the smallest unit of life that can replicate independently. It then ...
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378 views

What actually are the blood groups for human being?

We all know that, Human blood groups are of 4 types with Negative and Positive of each types. The Wikipedia article also states so. But according to this forum thread there are some other types too: ...
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130 views

Trauma, blood loss and thirst

Back story. Watched an episode of Arctic Air, (season three episode six), where they are practicing and hoping to become a licensed search and rescue airline. Anyhow; two hikers gets attacked by a ...
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121 views

Why do so many people have group O blood?

Please forgive me in case my question wouldn't make much sense. I was reading about ABO blood groups on Wikipedia, where I learnt that O is a recessive allele, and that it seems the A allele predates ...
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1answer
25 views

Detecting a Fasting State in the Body via Lasers

I was just wondering wether it would be possible to detect if the body is in a "fasting" state, via lasers attached to the body. If it is possible, what sort of laser would be needed?
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37 views

Does apheresis damage any components of blood? If not, why not?

Blood donation involving apheresis is becoming increasingly common. It looks like the process involves centrifuging blood at very high speeds* before removing the desired fraction and returning the ...
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77 views

What is the function of clot retraction?

I am thinking how clot retraction and fibrinolysis work together. I think that clot retraction is a process that gets clot towards fibrinolysis process. Fibrinolysis process then lyses the clot. ...
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23 views

Association of shorter telomeres with heart disease

From this paper Those with shorter telomeres in blood DNA had poorer survival, attributable in part to a 3.18-fold higher mortality rate from heart disease (95% CI 1(.)36-7.45, p=0.0079), and ...
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1answer
54 views

probability of having normal daughter

If father has hemophilia, mother is a carrier of the disease, then what is the probability of having a normal daughter ? My question: Should the probability of having a daughter be also ...
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1answer
84 views

Prothrombin time when extrinsic pathway is turned off

I was searching for an answer that "why do we need intrinsic pathway when there is fast extrinsic pathway" and i found the answer in the following link: http://www.pathologystudent.com/?p=3197 It ...
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1answer
299 views

Why do you need the intrinsic pathway when you have faster extrinsic pathway?

There are two pathways in blood clot fromation; the extrinsic pathway and the intrinsic pathway. The extrinsic pathway is faster than intrinsic pathway because it has less number of steps. So, why do ...
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29 views

Events after Endothelial interruption

What are the physiological events that occur after there is endothelial interruption in the blood vessel? What does endothelial interruption mean here? And what could be the physiological events?