The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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why we cant feel change in blood levels in our own body? [on hold]

why we cant feel blood levels in our own body? we feel thirsty, when our body have reduction in water levels, so why can't we feel changes in blood levels? even our body contains more blood than ...
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18 views

How is the loss of blood estimated after trauma? [duplicate]

How do medical professionals measure/estimate/guess the loss of blood after an accident?
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22k views

Why do mammalian red blood cells lack a nucleus?

How did the red blood cell in humans get to lose its nucleus (and other organelles)? Does the bone marrow just not put the nucleus in, or is it stripped out at some stage in the construction of the ...
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1k views

Why do we need red blood cells?

From what I know, the main function of red blood cells is hemoglobin transport. So, why do we need cells packed with hemoglobin: why can't it travel freely in the bloodstream? My own thoughts were: ...
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41 views

Can one use a hemocytometer on a compound upright microscope?

I'm posting this as a follow-up on What to look for when buying a light microscope?. The answerer states that you would need to use a an inverted microscope to count cell in the hemocytometer(counting ...
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1answer
30 views

What are the features on a microscope one needs in order to do lab work?

By lab work I mean urinalysis, blood work(live as well), fecals, cytologies, histologies and all other. I have read(partly) a book(from 2002) on lab diagnostics and the author did not mention ...
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1answer
86 views

How to translate a blood type used in Eastern Europe?

What are the I-IV blood type descriptions shown below (commonly used in Eastern Europe), and how do you translate them into the ABO-system?
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1answer
25 views

Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
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2answers
108 views

Fate of erythrocytes after splenectomy

The spleen is considered a graveyard for red blood cells. So in case of Splenectomy (complete surgical removal of the spleen), what would be the fate of red blood cells? Would this cause Polycythemia? ...
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68 views

What happens when you mix type A with type B blood (and v.v)

What happens when you mix different blood types that are not compatible? For example, if a patient has type A blood and receives type B blood, or v.v.?
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1k views

What percent of your blood can you lose before you need a transfusion

Losing a little blood is okay. If your a normal healthy person, and got into an accident, how do they know if you need a transfusion or if you'll be okay? This is hypothetical.
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932 views

What is this microscopic image from Peter Gabriel's New Blood album cover?

This image appears on the cover of Peter Gabriel's album New Blood. It appears to be a photograph of some microscopic biological cell. But it doesn't look like a blood cell to me. What kind of ...
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1answer
125 views

Why isn't RH disease present in other mammals?

Basically, I have read about RH disease, Its rare but it can happen when an RH + baby is conceived by an RH - mother. This raises many questions. I have heard this problem only happens with humans, ...
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220 views

What is the difference between regular blood, a woman's and a virgin's menstrual blood?

There are many stories that blood contains the life-force energy and specifically menstrual (period) blood has always been a feature of many rituals and some ancient Sumerian tablets mentioned that ...
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4answers
785 views

Antigen Antibody reactions during blood donation

A person wih blood group O is called a Universal Donor. Well, his plasma contains antibodies A and B. During blood donation, if blood group O is given to a person with blood group A (since blood group ...
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1answer
59 views

Why ml scale blood retrieval is required to run a blood test?

Substances found in blood are present at microscopic scale and tend to be invisible to the unaided eye. Why is a whole vial of blood (at ml scale) is required to assess the presence and concentration ...
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1answer
75 views

Blood consumption

Is consumption of blood more "dangerous" compared to meat? There was a news-article about unnatural chemicals found in the blood of mothers. This reminded me about a question I have pondered upon ...
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1answer
137 views

Why extract DNA from certain white blood cells instead of whole blood?

In my lab, human DNA is extracted from whole-blood samples. I don't actually do the extractions and I am not familiar with the specific protocol but I understand that platelets and red blood cells ...
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1answer
139 views

why does blood when oxidized over time become bluish green?

Oxygenated blood is bright red and deoxygenated blood is dark red or brown. If you take oxygenated blood and leave it in the air it will turn dark red, then brown, then finally a bluish green from ...
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1answer
39 views

What Effect would Cannabinoids have on the Acute Porphyrias?

I should be clear in saying that this question is NOT intended for personal medical advice. Rather what I am looking for is journal articles and/or books that touch on this subject because I think it ...
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1answer
41 views

Can lymph be in peripheral blood?

I read an argument that 1-3% of lymph is in peripheral blood. However, I am not sure if this lymph is about lymphocytes in peripheral blood; not lymph itself. Lymph gets exchanged between capillaries ...
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2answers
391 views

Do females living on mountains have more RBCs than a normal male [closed]

I got this doubt when I was studying about haematocrit value. According to my NCERT textbook males have greater number of RBCs than females. But who will have more RBCs when comparing a normal male ...
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1answer
288 views

Carbon Monoxide and High-Oxygen-Affinity Varieties of Hemoglobin

I recently learned about the concept of "affinity" in regards to hemoglobin. For hemoglobin in humans, carbon dioxide has a lower affinity than oxygen, which allows gas exchange to occur in our lungs. ...
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95 views

What percentage of human capillaries are located in the skin?

As in the subject line, what percentage of capillaries in a human (expressed in terms of total length, I suppose) are located in the skin, as opposed to internal organs? Google scholar has not turned ...
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1answer
99 views

Is it possible to condition the body to reduce bruising?

I do combat sports, and in these sports there are a lot of hits that can cause bruising. I've found that, over time, physical conditioning can reduce and/or eliminate the bruising to the point where ...
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27 views

Plateletpheresis for hemophilia

Plateletpheresis is seperation of platelets from whole blood and putting the leukocytes and erythrocytes back into the blood. If the person donating platelets does not have hemophilia than could a ...
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2answers
91 views

Blood Type Compatibility [closed]

It should be that because O+ blood(which is my blood type) has all antibodies but no antigens that all other blood types including O- would be incompatible making O not a universal donor so why is O ...
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1answer
36 views

Protoporphyrinogen (IX) formation in heme synthesis

This picture shows one of the steps of heme synthesis. In this step two propanoate groups of coproporphyrinogen III are decarboxylated to form protoporphyrinogen IX. The enzyme that catalyses this ...
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593 views

Why does hemoglobin's affinity for oxygen increase if an organism lives at a higher elevation where oxygen is lower?

Wouldn't its affinity for oxygen decrease because the acidity of the body would increase with the lack of oxygen? The textbook said otherwise though and I don't understand.
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149 views

Why are red blood cells considered to be cells?

Wikipedia states that a cell is the basic structural, functional and biological unit of all known living organisms. Cells are the smallest unit of life that can replicate independently. It then ...
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2answers
219 views

What actually are the blood groups for human being?

We all know that, Human blood groups are of 4 types with Negative and Positive of each types. The Wikipedia article also states so. But according to this forum thread there are some other types too: ...
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1answer
83 views

Trauma, blood loss and thirst

Back story. Watched an episode of Arctic Air, (season three episode six), where they are practicing and hoping to become a licensed search and rescue airline. Anyhow; two hikers gets attacked by a ...
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1answer
767 views

Why is prothrombin time test not used for heparin

Prothrombin time test is used for the monitoring of warfarin but not heparin. Why is this used for warfarin monitoring and why is it not used for heparin monitoring?
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94 views

Why do so many people have group O blood?

Please forgive me in case my question wouldn't make much sense. I was reading about ABO blood groups on Wikipedia, where I learnt that O is a recessive allele, and that it seems the A allele predates ...
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141 views

Does Blood Loss Shorten Telomeres?

If blood loss necessitates immediate cell division to replace lost cells, does the increase in cell division correlate to shortening of telomeres? Does it further cause the Hayflick Limit to be ...
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1answer
25 views

Detecting a Fasting State in the Body via Lasers

I was just wondering wether it would be possible to detect if the body is in a "fasting" state, via lasers attached to the body. If it is possible, what sort of laser would be needed?
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Does apheresis damage any components of blood? If not, why not?

Blood donation involving apheresis is becoming increasingly common. It looks like the process involves centrifuging blood at very high speeds* before removing the desired fraction and returning the ...
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1answer
53 views

What is the function of clot retraction?

I am thinking how clot retraction and fibrinolysis work together. I think that clot retraction is a process that gets clot towards fibrinolysis process. Fibrinolysis process then lyses the clot. ...
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1answer
20 views

Association of shorter telomeres with heart disease

From this paper Those with shorter telomeres in blood DNA had poorer survival, attributable in part to a 3.18-fold higher mortality rate from heart disease (95% CI 1(.)36-7.45, p=0.0079), and ...
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2answers
127 views

Rh factor and dominance of gene

"Formation of Rh antigen is controlled by dominant gene(R) and its absence by recipient gene(r).People having this antigen with genotype (RR or Rr) are called Rh positive and those whose blood ...
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1answer
75 views

Prothrombin time when extrinsic pathway is turned off

I was searching for an answer that "why do we need intrinsic pathway when there is fast extrinsic pathway" and i found the answer in the following link: http://www.pathologystudent.com/?p=3197 It ...
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5answers
7k views

Origin, or source, of rhesus negative in human blood

This is my first post here, so please be gentle. I recently learned that I have Rh- blood (I'm A-), and was idly looking into blood types on Wikipedia. I was surprised to find that relatively few ...
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51 views

probability of having normal daughter

If father has hemophilia, mother is a carrier of the disease, then what is the probability of having a normal daughter ? My question: Should the probability of having a daughter be also ...
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1answer
161 views

Why do you need the intrinsic pathway when you have faster extrinsic pathway?

There are two pathways in blood clot fromation; the extrinsic pathway and the intrinsic pathway. The extrinsic pathway is faster than intrinsic pathway because it has less number of steps. So, why do ...
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29 views

Events after Endothelial interruption

What are the physiological events that occur after there is endothelial interruption in the blood vessel? What does endothelial interruption mean here? And what could be the physiological events?
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1answer
62 views

Blood group probability question

My answer ( after rounding off) is 9% -100( 0.75 X 0.25 X 0.5) but the answer given is 22 % Am I correct ?
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1answer
205 views

How do proteins get into the blood stream?

So I'm asking this in reference to the injection of insulin, which is commonly done subcutaneously (in the hypodermis, a fatty part of skin). Now I know proteins usually get into the blood when ...
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1answer
2k views

Why does Blood clot outside the body? [closed]

The blood does not clot inside the body due to anti-coagulants. Why does it clot outside the body? For example; when the blood is taken in a tube, it clots after some time, why? Yes, a deficiency of ...
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1answer
23 views

External tissues, connected to the body?

Some cancer tumors suppress themselves from spreading. When such tumors are removed by surgery, the metastasis process is accelerated. Isn't it possible to put such tumors into external device like ...
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10k views

Is there any advantage to one blood type over another?

All humans can be grouped into ABO and Rh+/- blood groups (at a minimum). Is there any advantage at all to one group or the other? This article hints that there are some pathogens that display a ...