3
votes
1answer
70 views

How much energy is required to blind someone?

As I understand the ravages of sunlight upon the (human) eye; the cause of ocular damage and blindness is too much energy delivered to the cones and rods that ultimately make up our eyes; so the ...
5
votes
2answers
67 views

Improving myopia

I have a friend who no longer needs glasses. He previously had myopia in both eyes but over the years it has improved until he no longer needs glasses clinically. He's had glasses for over 30 years ...
2
votes
0answers
75 views

How is color information transmitted from eye to brain?

Is it frequency-modualated or are different colors transmitted by different axons? I know that each ganglion cell is connected to multiple photoreceptors. How does it tell the brain which ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

How well do we notice asynchronicity?

I'm stopped at a stoplight and, with nothing to do, my thoughts wander to the timed don't-walk sign that governs any pedestrians who might wish to cross the street I'm driving along. I can see two ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Why don't we have more cone cells (bigger fovea)?

Background Apart from being able to sense color, cone cells are able to perceive finer detail and more rapid changes in images, because their response times to stimuli are faster than those of rods. ...
3
votes
2answers
116 views

Why do our eyes “wrap” hue from UV to IR?

On the high-wavelength side of things, we see almost-infrared as reddish, with a slight tinge of magenta. On the low side, we see violet fading into the same magenta color. Why is that? You can see ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

What is it called when one human eye is seeing brighter color than the other?

What is the name of a phenomenon where one of the human eyes is seeing brighter/more saturated color than the other? I can observe the same object from the same position while alternating which eye is ...
2
votes
0answers
35 views

What processes are responsible for focusing on an image only seen by one of the eyes?

When a person is spying from around a corner with only one eye, it's rather easy to ignore the other eye's image, since it's probably much darker, because one usually spies around a corner standing ...
0
votes
0answers
109 views

Perception of distant lights without glasses

I am fairly short-sighted and wear glasses pretty much all the time. Naively, I would expect that when I take my glasses off, the image I see should look very much the same as as a photograph that's ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Is there an optimal illumination level for human habitats/workplaces?

I know of melanopsin, a photo pigment in mammal eye that helps regulate circadian rhythms. It responds most strongly to blue spectrum light. There have been experiments that demonstrated that ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

HSL Lightness vs Eye sensitivity

In a monochromatic spectrum, is the human eye equally able to distinguish between lighter colors just as it is in distinguishing between darker colors? I mean is there really a linear relationship ...
7
votes
2answers
456 views

Does every human eye see the same visible spectrum?

It is said that human eye can see light with wavelength approximately between 400nm and 700nm. Are these upper and lower bounds same for every human? If not, what are the means and standard ...
9
votes
2answers
24k views

Which shades/hues of color are easiest to distinguish for humans?

I'm trying to represent data graphically and am using a variation of hue/lightness to distinguish one data point from the next. I would like to use a color that would allow me to convey most ...
7
votes
1answer
233 views

What causes light to be brighter in the corner of the eyes?

I have noticed when in a dark room light and color seem to be brighter and more intense in the corner of my eyes. For example the light that comes from my digital clock seems like a dark pink when I ...
12
votes
2answers
186 views

Can a color-deficient person be made to visualize the missing colors?

Hope this is within the scope of this site. Color-deficient persons lack the cells in their retina needed for differentiating some (or all) colors. However, the part of the brain that actually ...
55
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a reason why human eyesight and plants make use of the same wavelength of light?

The accepted range for the wavelengths of light that the human eye can detect is roughly between 400nm and 700nm. Is it a co-incidence that these wavelengths are identical to those in the ...