The study of the immune system in organisms, primarily responsible for fighting infection.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

-2
votes
0answers
43 views

Buccal vaccine for viral infection of MALT

What would be the effect of a daily (repeated for several months) buccal or sublingual vaccine in the form of a deactivated virus - say HSV1 - to a person already infected with it? Whilst also ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

Which process is right to describe V(D)J recombination? RAG-1 and RSS recurring process

I'm studying V(D)J recombination. I think I have two incompatible books about explantaion of the process. Which is right? In Molecular Biology of the Cell 5th Ed., firstly RAG (-1?) combines to RSSs ...
6
votes
1answer
42 views

What is the impact of sertraline on white blood cells?

This simplified video and RT.com article discusses how the mechanics of the death of a white blood cell can be useful as an "alert mechanism" to other white blood cells of an incoming infection. Also ...
3
votes
2answers
61 views

Can suppression of the immune system help cure chronic diseases?

I am not a biologist, but recently while reading an article on Scholarpedia about self-organization I encountered a fascinating biological observation concerning immune response to infections. To ...
2
votes
1answer
26 views

What is self-immunoreactivity?

I read something like "some tested variants show self-immunoreactivity". So, what exacly is self-immunoreactivity? Is it something like antibodies induced by a specific variant showing ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Why “broad” instead of “large” cross-immunoreactivity? [closed]

From the articles I read, expressions like "broad cross-immunoreactivity" pops up a lot. So, I was wondering, why "broad" is used here instead of large? Is there a specific reason?
4
votes
1answer
31 views

Terminology regarding cross-immunoreactivity

After reading an article, I saw expressions like "cross-immunoreactivity among epitopes", "cross-immunoreactivity among variants of virus", "immunological reactions among pairs of peptides" and so on. ...
7
votes
0answers
53 views

What is cross-immunoreactivity, and how does it impact vaccine development?

What I understand about cross-immunoreactivity is that the antibody induced by one specific antigen is also fairly effective against another antigen. How would this be used for vaccine development? ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

How is cancer associated with host pathogen interaction?

Does cancer by any chance fall under host pathogen interaction domain? What I mean to ask is that, is there pathogen interaction involved in cancer? I went through this article: ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

White blood: cells concentration

Anyone knows of a table with average concentration that can be found in white blood? Something like: Neutrophils - 80% Mast cells - ?% Dendritic cells - ?% B cells - ?% Helper T cells - ?% Killer ...
4
votes
1answer
30 views

Why MHC class I antigen presentation exist in normal cells?

The book "Kuby Immunology" states that normal infected cells might present antigenic peptides on their surface via MHC class I, but these can't activate naive CD8 cells. Only infected professional ...
10
votes
1answer
69 views

Why some parts of the human body have immune privilege?

Why have the eye and CNS have immune privilege? Why does the body not develop tolerance against their tissue and instead risk their damage in case an accidental immune cell infiltration? Wiki: ...
5
votes
2answers
217 views

Specificity of the immune system

We know that the adaptive immune system recognizes foreign particles when their proteins are expessed of the the surface of T-cells, complexed with MHCs. But MHCs present only short peptides of length ...
7
votes
1answer
133 views

Magnetic-activated cell sorting vs. FACS

When sorting cell populations it is possible to use either magnetic-activated cell sorting or fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS). I am wondering when you would choose either technique and what ...
8
votes
1answer
85 views

Why are people unable to develop lasting immunity against Norovirus?

Infection with many viruses will result in decades-long if not lifetime immunity, for example chicken pox. Because of the large number of viruses responsible for the common cold, lifelong immunity to ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

Can leukopenia in a person with an otherwise normal immune system lead to non-infectious diseases in the long-term?

If a person has developed leukopenia as a side-effect of long-term use of anti-convulsant medications and his/her immune system appears normal otherwise (does not get infections any more often than a ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Further progression with neuroscience education [closed]

Question for you I hope this is in the right area and all if not please advise on where to put it, Having taken biological neuroscience for a year now as a masters program I feel like I want to go ...
0
votes
1answer
199 views

What is the function of dendritic cell in immunity?

I'm interested in how dendritic cells present antigens to helper T-cells? I'm also interested in the molecular actions between a dendritic cell and a helper T-cell during the activation of the helper ...
3
votes
2answers
71 views

Why can we use mouse-produced antibodies on mice tissues?

I have seen biologists use mouse grown primary antibodies in mouse tissue, and they've told me that if the blood is perfused well then there is no problem with this method. How does the secondary ...
2
votes
2answers
68 views

Is it possible to train allergic resistance by exposing yourself to allergens?

My hypothesis is that one can decrease the allergic reactions over time by continuously exposing yourself to slowly increasing doses of allergens. Is there any scientific evidence pointing this right ...
2
votes
0answers
33 views

What is NK-cell compartments?

with respect to the paper: Adaptive reconfiguration of the human NK-cell compartment in response to cytomegalovirus: A different perspective of the host-pathogen interaction What is meant by ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

What are host cellular factors?

With respect to this paper: Global Analysis of Host-Pathogen Interactions that Regulate Early-Stage HIV-1 Replication What does the term "host cellular factors" mean??
7
votes
1answer
110 views

Why do some vaccines last longer than others?

After reading an answer to the question of How Do White Blood Cells Learn? Or Do They?, I came to wonder something. Specifically, The effect of this is that every new B and T cell that your bone ...
15
votes
1answer
874 views

How Do White Blood Cells Learn? Or Do They?

So I get the concept that a vaccine is a weakened form of a virus so that the body can "learn" to fight it and make a person immune to that disease, but how exactly does this learning take place? What ...
2
votes
0answers
30 views

What makes substances allergenic?

Is it possible to tell or rule out (potentially a priori) whether any given substance or compound is likely and how likely to cause allergies with high confidence, without the need to conduct ...
3
votes
0answers
46 views

Human leukocytes (re)circulation/migration in homeostatic state

One can easily find information on the topic of leukocytes trafficking between vessels and peripheral tissues during inflammation. But what happens during normal states when there is no pathology? ...
5
votes
2answers
60 views

what does Pro→Glu substitution mean?

Considering the paper: A single amino acid in E-cadherin responsible for host specificity towards the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the abstract portion, what does Pro→Glu mean? Does it ...
3
votes
1answer
184 views

Why are sperm cells not attacked by the female immune system? [duplicate]

Whenever a foreign particle enters into someone's body, it is attacked by the white blood cells. I just want how it is that, when sperms enter the female body, they are not attacked by the the woman's ...
4
votes
2answers
146 views

Why White Blood Cells (WBCs) do not react to foreign bodies like sperm?

Why do the white blood cells allow foreign bodies like sperm to exist inside body cavity without any reaction? White blood cells function is to fight against foreign bodies (from the text books).
6
votes
1answer
47 views

What is a positive epitope fragment

What is a positive epitope fragment? I found one paper on the subject: COBEpro: a novel system for predicting continuous B-cell epitopes by Michael J. Sweredoski and Pierre Baldi
3
votes
0answers
46 views

eradicating h.pylori naturally

This question is not to discuss whether substances with anti-h.pylori agents works or not, or the pros and cons of such but from a medical perspective. Assuming that one manage to control, reduce, or ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

how do macrophages have the capacity to digest pathogen in opsonization

how do macrophages have the capacity to digest pathogen in opsonization but not in the first time when the pathogen is new and they play the role of antigen presenting cells(APCs) first ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

C1q attachment to antibodies

After reading about complement pathway and the complement components, I was wondering, does the C1q component attach to the Fab fragment or to the Fc fragment? The pictures in Janeway's Immunobiology ...
3
votes
1answer
163 views

Why can blood group O be given to all blood groups?

Blood group O has antibodies against antigens A and B. Blood group A has A antigen. If someone with blood group A receives donor blood with group O, then anti-A antibodies in the donor blood should ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

IgA complement activation

Recently, I have been reading Janeway's immunobiology and had a question on immunoglobin A. I read that IgA activates the complement pathway using the Fab fragment of the IgA. How does IgA do that? I ...
6
votes
1answer
80 views

Blood cells penetration

Is there a type of blood cell that can reach all other body cells? By "reach", I mean to "touch" the surface of the target cell. If we look at the red blood cell for example, that moves in blood ...
2
votes
2answers
53 views

Are we more/less resistant to infectious diseases during an allergic reaction?

To my understanding, an allergic response is a non-adaptive response of the immune system to some molecule. The molecule in question is therefore "thought by the immune system" to be infectious ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Binding of Multivalent Antibody to mutiple epitopes?

A multivalent antibody molecule such as Immunoglobulin M Immunoglobulin A etc bind to more than one antigens or epitopes but I am confused about that wheather these multivalent antibodies bind to ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

How can site-directed mutagenesis be used to suppress the production of anti-antibodies?

In a previous post of mine, I asked how to supress the creation of anti-antibodies in vivo. In the answer, it was mentioned that site-directed mutagenesis could be used. Currently, I can't find mcuh ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Ebola immunosupression and infection

I was wondering... If Ebola attacks immune cells and causes immunosupression, then shouldn't we see death in Ebola patients due to secondary infection?
4
votes
1answer
38 views

A few questions regarding immunology [closed]

I know that there is a variable region on antibodies which can recognize a wide variety of antigens, and that germinal centers create more "fit" antibodies to respond to an infection. So I was just ...
1
vote
1answer
21 views

allogeneic organ transplant and the immune response

What happens when an allogeneic organ transplant is performed on an immunocompetent recipient vs. when it is performed on an immunosuppresed recipient using a donated organ with immunocompetent cells? ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

How to inhibit formation of specific antibodies (to antisera)?

Is there a way to inhibit an antibody response to a specific antigen using immunosupression? I am interested in reducing the anti-antibody formation to animal antibodies such as murine antibodies in ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

human anti-mouse antibody

I have heard about human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) and read that HAMAs neutralize murine antibodies, therefore decreasing the effectiveness of those murine antibodies. Is this true that HAMAs ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

B-cell and T-cell activation by parasites

Parasitic infections lead to the production of parasite-specific IgE, but they also lead to the activation of nonspecific, polyclonal B-cells and T-cells. How do parasites trigger non-specific ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

MHC-I presentation during infection

Which cell type cannot process and present antigen peptide in association with MHC-I when it is infected?
3
votes
1answer
34 views

Action of Ebola Viruses

This video suggests that the first cell to be the victim of viral infection of ebola is the dendritic cell which acts as the leader of immune system cells.But I am unable to understand how the ...
3
votes
1answer
178 views

Why cytotoxic T cells don't kill dendritic cells when they present antigen?

When a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) recognizes a peptide presented in the MHC-1 of a dendritic cell (APC), why it doesn't kill this cell? I know that initially, in the lymph node, the T cell is ...
7
votes
1answer
78 views

B cell receptor editing

If a B cell contains two mu chains and two lambda chains and is self reactive can it go back and rearrange its kappa light chains? I'm not sure if it can only try to rearrange its lambda light chains ...
2
votes
2answers
21 views

Food allergen-related skin reactions and intestinal inflammation?

Are there any connections between food allergen-related skin reactions causing intestinal (or more broadly, gastrointestinal) generalized inflammation? If such a link exists, is it related to any of ...