The set of biochemical reactions that sustain life by directly or indirectly affecting energy expenditure and/or storage, as well as the complete regulation of those reactions and the enzymes that catalyze them; including, hormonal, cell-signaling, and substrate level regulation.

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Are there any intersections between the biochemical pathways of uracil biosynthesis (or metabolism) and methionine degradation in eukaryotes?

Is there any way in which uracil biosynthesis or metabolism could help cell in degradation of toxic levels of methionine?
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43 views

Cholesterol's role in lipid uptake [closed]

I'm studying the digestion of fats and I understand that our dietary fats mostly consist of triglycerides. We absorb the fats and eventually they end up in a muscle/adipose cell for storage (as ...
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119 views

Why are Mammals are unable to produce Essential Fatty Acids?

Why do we have to get them from our diet, and if they aren't taken in our diet we will face disease? Then why we don't have the enzymes which are require for EFA synthesis?
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76 views

Can the kidneys utilize ketone bodies for energy?

Ketone bodies are water-soluble and should pose no problem to the kidneys because of solubility. If the kidneys are able to utilize ketone bodies for energy, then they must express the enzyme ...
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2answers
8k views

What causes muscles to generate heat on contraction?

I'm curious what the exact cause is of dramatic heat generation that comes along with muscle activity. Can anybody explain this in understandable language?
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68 views

Can bacteria metabolize fatty acids for fuel?

I'm not a microbiologist, but rather a physiologist curious about microbial metabolism. Much like humans bacteria can utilize glucose, but when it comes to long chain, medium chain, or short chain ...
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564 views

When glucose production is low, the brain begins using ketoacids as energy… how does that work?

Can someone very generally describe how the brain consumes ketoacids/ketone bodies when blood glucose has been completely depleted?
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145 views

The smell from eating asparagus

I am wondering about one thing. I have read different accounts of this (prior to reading it on Wikipedia), so I am wondering. Here are the two versions I have read: asparagus leads in a certain ...
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381 views

Consumption of NAD+ in glycolysis

Out of 10 steps in glycolysis, only one reaction- Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (PGP), uses NAD+ and thereby producing NADH. Furthermore, this very step is solely ...
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2k views

Circulation through the liver in light of drug metabolism

I have a lingering question which stems from an answer that I gave to What hydrolyses aspirin within the digestive tract and blood stream? When a drug or any other substance is absorbed into the ...
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82 views

By what mechanism is NADP+ converted to NADPH in Photosystem I? [closed]

Here is my current understanding: $\mathrm{NADP^{+}}$ takes 2 electrons from Ferredoxin at the end of the electron transport chain to generate $\mathrm{NADP^{-}}$. An $\mathrm{H^{+}}$ ion in the ...
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2answers
301 views

Equilibrium and Metabolism: Can cells exist at STATIC equilibrium? What about dynamic equilibrium?

I understand that in closed systems, once reactions reach equilibrium, they can no longer be used to power other reactions. If a cell was a closed system (which it is not), being at equilibrium would ...
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531 views

How is excretion of metabolic wastes from a cell related to its size?

As with anything that is taking place within a cell, the metabolic waste too must be proportional to the size of the cell. In particular the surface area to volume ratio. But how is the waste ...
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107 views

Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...
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155 views

Tracking of oxygen molecules in glucose oxidation

For this reaction, found in typical biochemistry textbook: $C_6H_{12}O_6 + 6O_2 \to 6CO_2 + 6H_2O$ I am interested in where do the oxygen atoms of $6O_2$ go. I think they go to $6H_2O$, but this is ...
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598 views

Why would lactate be high in diabetics?

Why are lactate level high in diabetes? For example, type II diabetes are resistant to insulin. If those patients are insulin resistant their gluconeogenesis should be working at a high rate and, ...
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128 views

Hibernation, Metabolism and Aging

People are beginning to seriously research space travel applications of therapeutic hypothermia, specifically for reducing metabolism and stress on humans traveling to Mars. It seems that as you ...
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175 views

ATP utilized in Glycolysis vs. Gluconeogenesis

In glycolysis, the conversion of glucose to pyruvate results in a net gain of 2 ATP molecules. In gluconeogenesis however, the conversion of pyruvate back to glucose requires 6 ATP molecules. Why ...
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134 views

How do muscle cells synthesize glycogen?

Hexokinase enzyme is present in all cells (including muscle cells) and can be suppressed by excessive G-6-P product. So that's why in the liver, glucokinase can act on glucose without inhibition of it ...
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221 views

Where do the H+ ions come from in light reactions?

In the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, H+ ions pass to the thylakoid space. Where do these protons come from?
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1k views

How are non-glucose sugars metabolized in the body?

In my biology book's section on disaccharide metabolism and glycolysis, it states that sugars other than glucose must be acted upon to enter glycolysis. Let's take sucrose as an example. Sucrose is ...
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111 views

Can cats use ketone bodies as only source of energy?

I recall reading that much of the energy a cat produces from its food comes from proteins which I assume would produce energy via being catabolised into amino acids which in turn, if glucogenic, would ...
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1answer
66 views

How does heat generated by metabolism differ compared with heat generated through exercise?

I am from a mathematical background so I don't have much knowledge on biology. I'm building a mathematical model to predict heat generation with parameters of metabolic heat generation and exercise ...
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1answer
48 views

Why would growth hormone (somatotropin) cause both lipid AND glucose release?

GH increases lipolysis (lipid breakdown) and the release of fatty acids from adipocytes into the blood. Fatty acids then can be used as energy sources to drive chemical reactions, including ...
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100 views

Catabolism and muscle energy intake

From my own reading, there are three ways used by the body to produce energy: Alactic anaerobic (direct degradation of ATP and creatine phosphate for regeneration of ATP) Lactic anaerobic (breakdown ...
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2answers
250 views

How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
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71 views

Can chitosan affect the absorption of unsaturated fatty acid?

I know chitosan will decrease the absorption of fat. However unsaturated fatty acid, such as DHA, is beneficial. Does chitosan effect the absorption of unsaturated fatty acid?
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51 views

bacterial cell wall degradation in humans

can human degrade the D-amino acid present in bacterial cell wall, I'm confused about it i have read somewhere that human can do so.If yes than why we need antibiotic to kill bacteria???If it is not ...
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177 views

Why doesn't Diabetes cause death by starvation?

The main cause for diabetes is lack of insulin in the body. Insulin is the hormone that allows body cells to absorb glucose from the blood. With out insulin, the body cells can't get glucose from the ...
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37 views

What is the substrate for glycogenesis?

In glycogenesis (i.e. the synthesis of glycogen), are sugar phosphates the direct substrates for glycogen polymerization? I would certainly think so since glucose is phosphorylated and then stuck onto ...
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19 views

Cellular demand for antioxidants

Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione serve to inactivate radicals and counteract spontaneous oxidation reactions, such as unwanted disulfide bonds in proteins. These systems are cycles, ...
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24 views

Are there animals that can deliberately manipulate their metabolism, apart from hibernation?

Are there animals that can slow down their metabolism deliberately? I know that hibernation would be one mechanism, and maybe being cold-blooded, but I was wondering if there was maybe an animal that ...
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26 views

Are there bacteria that respire anaerobically in aerobic conditions?

There are facultative aerobic bacteria that switch to aerobic respiration in an aerobic state, but are there any organisms that would still perform anerobic respiration even when shifted to aerobic ...
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1answer
100 views

What is the energy consumption of the brain?

What is the energy consumption of the brain, and is there a difference in consumption when waking and sleeping?
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35 views

Are there any enzymes synthesised by humans that specifically catalyse the hydrolysis of non-cyclic Imides?

Imides or dicarbonyl amides are an interesting class of compounds that includes the pharmaceuticals thalidomide, aniracetam and a few other drugs. These compounds, however, are cyclic and I'm ...
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78 views

Iron metabolism in the brain

I did an expression profiling from publicly available RNAseq data for mouse tissues. While for liver and testes I am getting expected proteins in the top highly expressed mRNAs, for brain I am getting ...
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89 views

Food Intake versus ability to flee among birds, particularly the hummingbird?

Logically speaking, if a hummingbird drinks too much nectar, it will be temporarily overweight and less able or unable to fly to escape danger. However if the same hummingbird doesn't drink enough ...
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3answers
8k views

Why do we weigh less in the morning?

At first I thought it may be related to physics. You know, in one half of the day, the gravity changes, and the scale shows a different weight than the other. Then at night, gravity intensifies, and ...
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3answers
993 views

Are all body atoms really recycled several times during a life?

I heard a point, that all (human) body atoms are recycled withing short period like few years. Recycled means "old" atoms are replaced by "new" ones during metabolism, leaving only structure ...
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1answer
893 views

Why does NAD+ become reduced if it gains a hydrogen proton?

I've heard that $NAD^+$ gains a Hydrogen proton during glycolysis and the Krebs cycle and becomes reduced to $NADH$. However, isn't reduction when a molecule receives an electron? Maybe I've been ...
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1answer
227 views

Where does an organism store reserves of amino acids?

Where does an organism store reserves of the amino acids it needs to build various proteins it needs -- in the liver ? in the blood ? in every cell ? Thanks
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1answer
110 views

Are carbohydrates an essential component of human diet?

Are people able to satisfy all the needs of a healthy diet without consuming carbohydrates? My question includes the assumption that a person has no health condition that would prevent them from ...
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96 views

what makes our body warm?

I would think that there would so many chemical reactions going inside our body,friction produced by blood in veins, subcutaneous and visceral fat acting as heat insulators. I was wondering to what ...
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60 views

How are ketone bodies used?

While searching for literature on ketone bodies, I can only seem to find how they are synthesized, but not how they are broken down. I'm looking for the series of events with enzyme names and ...
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1answer
651 views

Anaerobic respiration choice in E. coli

Under anaerobic conditions E. coli has two options to generate ATP: fermentation (substrate-level phosphorylation), and respiration (proton gradient, chemisomotic phosphorylation). Which is favored? ...
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1answer
150 views

Is anaerobic activity during ketosis possible?

When a person's glucose and glycogen stores are depleted, which can occur due to fasting or due to a diet consisting largely of fat (like eskimo diets), the body produces its energy by breaking down ...
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1answer
42 views

What are calories and how to burn them? [closed]

What exactly is a calorie? When burning calories, do we always lose fat? I have tried many apps to measure calories, do they give exact amounts? How many calories should be taken a day?
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1answer
113 views

Why would the citrulline content of the watermelon be so high?

Citrulline is a non-proteinogenic amino acid (that is, citrulline is an amino acid that is not coded for in mRNA), and it is an important metabolic intermediate in the Urea Cycle. The Urea Cycle is ...
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1answer
66 views

Are there differences in energy of glucose isomers?

There are many isomers of glucose, including galactose and fructose. Do they have different chemical energy levels, and why? What makes galactose and fructose useful compared to glucose, and would ...
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2answers
964 views

What are the differences between how glucagon and cortisol work to increase blood sugar?

As I understand, both cortisol and glucagon cause an increase in blood sugar concentrations. However I don't understand how they work differently or why they work separately. I would be very grateful ...