The set of chemical reactions that happen in the cells of living organisms to sustain life.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
1answer
142 views

Where does an organism store reserves of amino acids?

Where does an organism store reserves of the amino acids it needs to build various proteins it needs -- in the liver ? in the blood ? in every cell ? Thanks
2
votes
1answer
284 views

Anaerobic respiration choice in E. coli

Under anaerobic conditions E. coli has two options to generate ATP: fermentation (substrate-level phosphorylation), and respiration (proton gradient, chemisomotic phosphorylation). Which is favored? ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

How are ketone bodies used?

While searching for literature on ketone bodies, I can only seem to find how they are synthesized, but not how they are broken down. I'm looking for the series of events with enzyme names and ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

naturally occuring fatty acids

The double bonds in naturally occurring fatty acids present in our body are in cis configuration while the enzymes for beta oxidation can act on trans double bond. Then what will be the significance ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

How much solar energy required to compensate food?

Just curious, how much solar energy can power an (herbivore) animal? Specifically, is it enough sunlight on Mercury (4 to 10 times brighter than on Earth) to "feed" a zebra? Will it be sufficient at ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Is anaerobic activity during ketosis possible?

When a person's glucose and glycogen stores are depleted, which can occur due to fasting or due to a diet consisting largely of fat (like eskimo diets), the body produces its energy by breaking down ...
2
votes
1answer
920 views

Circulation through the liver in light of drug metabolism

I have a lingering question which stems from an answer that I gave to What hydrolyses aspirin within the digestive tract and blood stream? When a drug or any other substance is absorbed into the ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

How does the human body use energy?

As far as I know the glucose gets processed from carbs and fats and as a result carbon dioxide, water and "energy" are released. The carbon dioxide and water are expelled by the body, and then energy ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Currency metabolites vs. current metabolites: What's the right term?

I have seen the two terms currency metabolite and current metabolite used interchangeably. Is there a consensus on which is the ...
2
votes
1answer
157 views

what is the margarine metabolism in our body?

margarine is commonly used food ingredients that contribute to both inflammation and obesity , but actually I want to know the margarine metabolism in the human body I can find some resources talk ...
2
votes
2answers
151 views

Why isn't phosphorus or nitrogen a limiting nutrient for animals?

Nitrogen and Phosphorus are usually the limiting nutrient for plants, especially for algae. Phosphorus is used for DNA, ATP and phospholipids, and Nitrogen is used for pretty much every protein a ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

How usable is the Human Metabolic Model to predict biomass?

In order to use the Human Metabolic Model for Flux Balance Analysis of specific cancer cell lines, we would like to know what sort of flux values have been determined for the Human Metabolic Model. ...
2
votes
1answer
367 views

How is transport of glucose into prokaryotic cells different from transport into eukaryotic cells?

I was reading page 92 of Fundamentals of Microbiology, 4th edition, which states In facilitated diffusion, the substance (glucose, for example) to be transported combines with a plasma membrane ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Are (baseline) high blood levels of melatonin associated with either circadian rhythm or mood disorders?

(Exogenous) melatonin is administered at night for treatment of circadian rhythm disorders, but melatonin taken during the day is linked with depression. I would like to know if high blood levels of ...
2
votes
1answer
359 views

What marine animals exhibit deep hibernation/aestivation?

Do marine animals exhibit deep hibernation/aestivation as land-based creatures do? If not, Why?
2
votes
1answer
65 views

What is the role of Homocysteine in cognitive function?

I'm looking at this link : Homocysteine and cognitive impairments and am looking for more information on specific cognitive impairments associated with elevated levels Homocysteine. That article is ...
2
votes
1answer
22 views

MTHFR recessive alleles and B-vitamins

I know that being heterozygous or homozygous recessive for the MTHFR gene prevents that person from being able to process and use folate and B-12. It causes an unhealthy level of homocysteine to ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Metabolism of different saccharides

Learning about carbohydrates, I wonder what the differences there are in terms of metabolism, and overall health between the different types of saccharides. In other words, does the body use ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...
2
votes
2answers
82 views

How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Aerobe or facultative anaerobe organism that metabolizes acetate?

I'm assuming bacteria, but will take any suggestions. Organism must survive primarily on the acetate (plus trace elements), but I can give/take electrons, if necessary. Not interested in strict ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Why is duck fat less saturated than cow fat?

Why does the composition of fat in animals vary? Is there an evolutionary advantage to producing fat that is less or more saturated?
2
votes
1answer
120 views

How can we distinguish blended flavors?

As far as I know, humans can distinguish between 5 basic tastes based on various molecules in food and their interactions. There's a level to all 5 so there can be an endless variety of tastes, and we ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

What are the differences between white and brown adipose tissue?

What are the differences between white and brown adipose tissue? Here are some that I have come across: ...
2
votes
0answers
19 views

Which biosynthetic pathways take place in the plastid and were are they located?

I know that the isoprenoid, jasmonate, glucosinolate, fatty acids, chlorophyll, starch, and aromatic amino acid syntheses are located in the plastid. But I don't know if they are located in the ...
2
votes
0answers
49 views

Does the metabolic rate determine how fast the telomeres shorten?

In many papers one can read that telomeres may play an important role in longevity. According to Calado et al.1 the telomeres of mice are much longer than the telomeres of humans. However, mice have ...
2
votes
0answers
28 views

Is body energy production and consumption cyclical?

If we look into how energy is produced by the humans, it always involves some kind of periodicity: fuel combustion rotates engines, water rotates turbines, nuclear chain reactions heat up water, which ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

Why Mammals are unable to produce Essential Fatty Acids?

While we have to get them from our diet and if they aren't taken in our diet we will face disease.Then why we don't have the enzymes which are require for EFA synthesis???
2
votes
1answer
80 views

What is the energy consumption of the brain?

What is the energy consumption of the brain, and is there a difference in consumption when waking and sleeping?
2
votes
0answers
70 views

Why is a nicotinamide-tryptophan combination used to treat affective episodes in a few older clinical trials?

At least one of the journal articles that reported on such clinical trials allured to the nicotinamide-tryptophan pathway that I assume must be related to the metabolism of tryptophan into serotonin ...
2
votes
0answers
105 views

Are simple esters like those used as flavouring agents metabolised into their constituent carboxylic acids and alcohols in the human body?

By this I mean to ask whether say ethyl butanoate is hydrolysed in humans into ethanol and butyric (butanoic) acid. This is of interest to me as a pharmacology researcher because butyric acid, for ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

How much does a human brain's metabolic rate vary? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does brain energy consumption depend on mental activity? Our brains consume about 20% of our energy when we're at rest. How variable is a human brain's energy ...
1
vote
2answers
369 views

carbohydrates and lipids as a source of energy? why?

Why carbohydrates and lipids basically used as a sources of energy? Why only proteins are used as building blocks of all the creations? Yes there are some parts of cells like cell walls in which ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Is it easier to burn a calorie of fat or a calorie of a carbohydrate?

Say someone eats 100 calories of chocolate vs. 100 calories of carrots. Something tells me that eating the chocolate will lead to you generating more fat. Will it? Is it harder to burn the calories ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Where can I find the metabolic network for the human erythrocyte?

Where can I find the metabolic network of the human erythrocyte (red blood cell), in SBML format? The red blood cell metabolic network is a model that's usually employed in the literature [see refs ...
1
vote
1answer
239 views

Why does beta-2-Thienylalanine inhibit bacterial growth?

I'm trying to obtain a better understanding of the Guthrie Test, which checks whether people have a disease called PKU. The Guthrie test uses bacteria to check for Phenylalanine (the amino acid) in ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Mitochondria variability per tissue in humans?

I would like to know the distribution of mitochondrial content per tissue type in humans. I understand the simple metric that energetically active or energy requiring tissues will have more ...
1
vote
3answers
77 views

What is the relationship between protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks? [closed]

I am trying to find out how these networks can be linked together. I know that Protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks both fall under the Intra-cellular type of biological ...
1
vote
1answer
150 views

How do Gram + bacteria use a proton gradient for F-type ATPase?

Does anyone know of any papers showing how Gram positive Fermiculates or Actinobacteria use a H+ gradient for an F-type ATPase, It seems impossible since there is no outer LPS membrane to maintain ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

What are good data on the Human Metabolic Model and where can I get them?

Trying to get a good SBML representation of the Human Metabolic Model for use in Flux Balance Analysis and drug targetting (i.e. gene knockout) simulations. What are good sources for these data? ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Does creatine-phosphate (CP) supplementation regenerate NADH?

I have the following facts: It is possible to convert ATP <-> creatine vice-versa. (ref - non scientific) CP supplementation protects against metabolic syndrome. ref1 ref2 Fructose digestion ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Do muscles still hold glycogen reserves if there is no carbohydrate input

Afaik skeletal muscles take glucose from the blood to store it localy as glycogen, to be used in the case of intensive exercise. Does this still happen if the calorie input is exclusively made up ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Why use creatine phosphate?

We use creatine phosphate as an energy storage to resupply ADP with a phosphate group as our muscle cells only contain about 2-5 mM ATP. But why doesn't the muscle cells just keep 20-30 mM ATP instead ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Could the Warburg effect be used to starve cancer cells in situ?

What is wrong with the following chain of reasoning? Nearly all cancer cells rely on high rates of glucose uptake (upto 200 times more than normal cells). This is known as the the Warburg effect. ...
1
vote
1answer
136 views

How to relate human metabolic model reactions and cancer drug targets / reactome items?

Trying to find a way to take a cancer drug (from CancerDR, for instance) and infer the metabolic reactions that are affected by it in the Human Metabolic Model. Essentially, I would like to know ...
1
vote
3answers
200 views

Assay for Beta-galactosidase activity in single cell microscopy

I'd like to be able to measure the activity of $\beta$-galactosidase in living cells with simple optical (maybe fluorescence) microscopy. Ideally I'd like to do a minimum of genetic engineering, and ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Genotoxic agent and their metabolic pathway

What are the mechanics (set of biochemical reactions) allowing a given genotoxic agent to modify the mutation rate at a given spot? to induce only a given type of mutation (from Gs to Cs for ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Isoprenoid Diphosphate Concentration in Yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae

Isoprenoid Diphosphate(IPP) is an important metabolites which is precursor in lot of secondary metabolites like Dolichol diphosphate, ubiquinone, prenylated proteins and carotenoid (not synthesized ...
1
vote
1answer
527 views

Why does the hydrolysis of ATP increasing entropy increase the Phosphoryl-­‐transfer Potential?

I am currently taking a biology class. I do not understand this concept. I understand that the electrostatic repulsion of the negative charges, resonance stabilization and hydration stabilization all ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Where do the H+ ions come from in light reactions?

In the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, H+ ions pass to the thylakoid space. Where do these protons come from?