Microbiology is the study of organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. This includes organisms like bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and others.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
2answers
21 views

Full Sequence for Plasmid pMG101

I am trying to find the full plasmid sequence for pMG101. I have been looking through other papers that have sequenced this plasmid. The GenBank access numbers I got are the following: AY009372–...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How do prions replicate?

Living organisms contain genetic material to replicate, but prions, being protein particles, are able to replicate independently of genetic material. This ability causes diseases associated with ...
0
votes
0answers
5 views

How far are enhancer regions usually from the promoter ?

I am trying to isolate a promoter region which must include the promoter start site, and an enhancer region in which a protein will bind. However the genetic sequence which this protein binds is ...
3
votes
1answer
23 views

How specific are CRISPR-cas9 cuts?

CRISPR-cas9 uses a string of RNA that matches with DNA and makes a double stranded cut at that point. If the RNA is just a few letters in length, the enzyme would cut DNA in many places. It would be ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Comments on Experimental result regarding Anti-Bacterial soap

After using soaps, we rinse our hands with water. Do bacteria from the water attach themselves to our hands again? If we wipe our hands to cloth after washing our hands, do bacteria from the cloth ...
2
votes
0answers
21 views

Viruses affecting transmission capability of mosquitoes

I've read about bacteria affecting the transmission capability of mosquitoes. For example: Wolbachia suppresses dengue transmission When mosquitoes were given antibiotics that decreased their gut ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

What is the meaning of a reported OD600 value?

I can't find a reference that explains what, for example, OD600 = 0.1 means. For example, Wikipedia states OD600 is an abbreviation indicating the absorbance, or optical density, of a sample ...
-1
votes
2answers
28 views

Good microscope? [duplicate]

Hi I am a teenager and I recently studied biology and found it very interesting. I want to get a microscope and study further into the microscopic world. What would be the best microscope for me? I ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Why Streptococcus bacterias don't separate completely?

Why Streptococcus bacterias don't separate completely from each other? Is there any connection with this phenomenon and Fts proteins and related mechanism in cell devision?
2
votes
1answer
31 views

What constitutes as the death of a bacteria?

I've read that some bacteria can survive a long time without food. What constitutes the death of a bacteria ? What process needs to take place for it to be considered dead?
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Are all prokaryotic promotor regions the same, or do they differ depending on the product of the transcript?

Are all prokaryotic promotor regions the same or do they differ depending on the protein encoded by the mRNA being transcribed? What I am thinking is that if activator proteins are a method of ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Why do we need to insert CO2 artifically to Microalgae pools?

Say I take a Chlorella culture and put it in mineral water inside a metal tub under the sun in the backyard --- Why do I need to insert CO2 to this? I mean, Chlorella that grows in freshwater lakes ...
9
votes
2answers
711 views

How are antibiotic resistant bacterial infections treated?

For example, how are infections of antibiotic resistant strains of MRSA, Streptococcus, or Gonorrhea treated?
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Collecting Specific Microorganism Specimens Under Microscope

What are options for collecting individual specimens beneath a microscope? I have been looking at needled syringes on amazon, however I am not sure what gauge to be looking at before making a purchase,...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Enzootic vs Epizootic?

I'm studying microbiology and I see these words - epizootic and enzootic, often but there are no clear explanations for them online. Can someone help please?
0
votes
0answers
6 views

How common is it for environmentally occurring bacillus strain to contain some sort of plasmid?

I am designing a method for testing whether two new bacillus isolates, that are ionic silver resistant, store the silver resistance mechanism on a plasmid or on the chromosome of the bacteria. In my ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Geographical distribution of malaria and tuberculosis

Unlike malaria, tuberculosis (TB) is found across the whole world. Why and explain? I mean why are people affected with TB more than malaria and some say that in cold and developed countries malaria ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

How to feed bacteria out of lab

I want to take a sample of skin infection bacteria (I suppose combination of staphylococus, strep, etc) and give it to the doctor for analysis but the appointment is in two weeks. The bacteria will be ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Zika Acquired Immunity

A woman is bitten by a mosquito carrying the Zika virus and then develops symptoms. Her symptoms disappear after a given amount of time and she becomes effectively immune to reinfection (assuming she ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

How can an individual have A- and B- antibodies and no A- and B-antigens? [duplicate]

Why, or how, can someone of the "O Blood group" have A- and B-antibodies without having A- and B-antigens? This doesn't make sense to me, as an antigen is required to trigger antibody production?
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Forgot to cool slides before washing

I just finished an immunofluorescence experiment and I'm wondering what went wrong. The tissues seem dimmer than they should be. One mistake I made was: I completed the antigen retrieval step, in a ...
7
votes
1answer
90 views

What makes worms' eggs float or sink?

In parasitology, while examining the stool sample, one important thing you do is test whether the eggs float on water or sink. We never did that since our coursework limits itself to microscopic ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Is there any technique other than restriction enzymes to introduce staggered cuts into DNA?

I'm curious about introducing staggered cuts into DNA, but wonder if there is a way to do this in vivo in E. coli, as I heard introducing restriction enzymes on a plasmid would end up just shredding ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

How do you technically perform the Ames test?

Is it necessary to take into account the volume of gm-agar(bottom) in the concentration determination, or is that determined only by the concentration in the top agar? I found several articles that ...
3
votes
2answers
43 views

Do disaccharidases require a cofactor or coenzyme to function?

I'm doing research on lactose intolerance and am curious if disaccharidases (enzymes that break down disaccharides) require a cofactor or coenzyme to function? Reviews or references would be greatly ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Optical Density conversion to cfu / ml

I am having troubles understanding the correlation between OD measurements and CFU/ml. What is the conversion factor between the two units, and does this conversion factor somehow compensate for dead ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Fine permanent fluorescent marker for blue light

I am looking for a fine- (or small-)tipped permanent marker to write on Petri dishes that is visible under a blue light or a transilluminator. It would seem obvious, but it is a nuisance. The ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Does prokaryotic transcription have activators / enhancer regions involved?

I am designing a biosensor, and I need to know whether prokaryotic transcription involves or can involve (if a gene needs to be regulated) enhancer regions. Also, where are enhancer regions located (...
3
votes
4answers
7k views

Why do cell membranes have a lipid bilayer instead of a monolayer?

Many cells have a cell membrane composed of two layers of lipids. Why is it that they have two layers and not just one? What purpose do this arrangement serve?
1
vote
1answer
34 views

What can saliva tell about ones health? [closed]

I was wondering if I d want to analyze something related to my current health based on my saliva. What could it be? I mean e.g. by putting a thermometer in your mouth you can know your body ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

What membrane material(s) is/are used in a diffusion chamber and where can I get this/these material(s)?

I am participating in community biolab and am investigating using diffusion chambers for culturing novel species of bacteria as well other experiments. The type of diffusion chamber I am hoping to use ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Term of the type xxx-troph for a compound not used by an organism

A prototroph for compound X can make it, a bradytroph grows faster if X is scavenged, an auxotroph needs to scavenge it and a hyperauxotroph lacks both the biosynthetic pathway and the transporters. ...
3
votes
1answer
166 views

How does the MMR vaccine affect lymph nodes in preventing measles?

I am trying to understand this statement about the Measles part of the MMR (Mumps, Measles and Rubella) vaccine Measles prevention: MMR (AB protect during primary and secondary viremia) Measles ...
4
votes
1answer
150 views

Non-monotonic knock-out effects in prokaryotes

Typically, when performing gene-knockout, the experimenters select one gene to remove/replace-with-junk and then see if the prokaryote can still undergo fission. If it continues to reproduce then the ...
1
vote
0answers
169 views

What is Mycoplasma Lyo medium?

Used for instance in this article The role of genital mycoplasmas as pathogens - - are generally neglected by diagnostic laboratories in the United Kingdom, possibly due to the lack of a ...
2
votes
0answers
22 views

Does alpha-amylase from different species have different *optimal* conditions?

Do the optimal conditions for the enzyme isoforms differ between species? Specifically, do the optimal pH and temperature for alpha-amylase differ for that enzyme produced by B. lichiniformis and A. ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Has Staphylococcus aureus ever been used against cancer?

Treating inoperable tumors with bacteria appears to be very effective, albeit being toxic to the patient as well. Has (live attenuated) Staphylococcus aureus ever been used against cancer? If the ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Link between NaCl and sulfide reducing bacteria

Could there be any link between the consumption of NaCl and sulfide-reducing bacteria? In my study on mice, sulfide-reducing bacteria (SRB) are more abundant, in high-salt-fed group compared to the ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Did Cyanobacteria alone create the oxygen in Earth's atmosphere 3.5 billion years ago?

In other words, is the conveniently close-to-Californian-Universities pools of such representative of accepted theory. With the immediate follow-up question, when did the much more impressive amount ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How does the body know to stop effector cell proliferation?

After a pathogen has been successfully neutralized, effector cells such as the plasma cells and the cytotoxic T cells which are specific for that pathogen decrease in numbers. What is the signal in ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

Red transcriptional reporter in Psudomonas putida

I need to build a transcriptional reporter in P. putida with high excitation wavelength,in order to decrease phototoxicity (I have been using mNeonGreen until now, and I would like to try something ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Does adding antibiotic after 5-10 mins of innoculation affect the protein yield or growth?

I've asked a lab colleague the same question. She said, it would loosen the bacterial cells in the LB medium and plasmids would come out. Is that true? and why?
1
vote
0answers
24 views

How do I “reinoculate” a petri dish with new bacteria?

Hypothetical question, intended to find a general procedure rather than case-specific recommendations: I have a petri dish full of growth medium with a large population of gram-negative, anaerobic ...
3
votes
0answers
40 views

Is diarrhoea advantageous to the microbe?

Diarrhoea is a common side effect of many feco-orally transmitted bacterial infections. How does diarrhoea help the pathogen? Should it not have a selective evolutionary advantage? Do all symptoms of ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Why do gram-positive bacteria cause respiratory diseases more frequently than gram-negative bacteria? [closed]

My theory is that aerobic respiration by gram positive bacteria thrives in ideal conditions of the lungs therefore creates respiratory diseases?
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Is this bacteria or fungi?

I've been growing bacteria on an agar plate and after putting the dishes in the incubator, this is what I saw. I'm new to bacteria identification, and is this just contamination by fungi or is this ...
12
votes
2answers
182 views

Can viruses be toxic?

Bacteria can produce toxins like endotoxins and exotoxins. In diseases like cholera or tetanus they can harm infected people due to these toxins. Now, although viruses are much smaller and are ...
4
votes
1answer
125 views

Which literature/study/myth spurred the idea that urine is sterile?

There is a seemingly unfounded mantra that a person's urine is sterile who is not suffering from a UTI. So far I have found convincing evidence to the contrary; urine is not sterile. This poster ...
3
votes
0answers
108 views

How can I keep pond water “alive”?

I've been preparing wet slides for my kids to look at from pond water. I have a mason jar of pond water. What can I do to keep the microbes in the jar alive going forward so that we can look at it any ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

What prevent us from synthesizing a cell from “scratch”?

In this recent article "Design and synthesis of a minimal bacterial genome", they created a minimal cell with only 473 genes. However, they didn't synthesize all of the necessary components of the ...