Microbiology is the study of organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. This includes organisms like bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and others.

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Are there bacteria that respire anaerobically in aerobic conditions?

There are facultative aerobic bacteria that switch to aerobic respiration in an aerobic state, but are there any organisms that would still perform anerobic respiration even when shifted to aerobic ...
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23 views

What are the differences among food poisoning, gastroenetritis and diarrhoea?

I have now studied a major chunk of my microbiology course without understanding the basic difference between the three. The terminologies seem to be confusing. Is it a necessity for food poisoning to ...
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Why are vegetations in Infective endocarditis common on the atrial side?

Robbin's Pathology says that vegetations of IE are more common on the atrial side in AV valves. In Liebmann Sack's Endocarditis, which is a sterile (non bacterial) type of endocarditis, the underside ...
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71 views

How can I make sure my UV-purificator kills bacteria?

I'm going to show a UV-purificator for water on science fair. How can I easily check if purificator kills most of the bacteria? I need a quick and possibly easy method.
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63 views

What would happen if there were no protists? [closed]

This is for an inquiry project for my biology 11 class. I need opinions from some professionals so please help out.:) if you dont mind also putting your name and what you do or what degree you that ...
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22 views

How does the snail shells' fertilizer compare to regular fertilizers?

May I ask about the quality of the fertilizer derived from the shells and their effectiveness compared to other fertilizers on the market ?
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45 views

How to transform snail shells into a fertilizer? [closed]

I heard that the chemical structure of the snail shell has elements that help in waste water treatment and in some cases as a fertilizer? What is the process used to render snail shells into ...
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1answer
44 views

Soft Agar Substitute

I've got petri dishes with a base agar layer ready for E. coli culturing. However, I do not have soft agar in which to dilute the E. coli before pouring it on to the plate. Any suggestions on what ...
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19 views

How to promote denitrifying microbe activity

I'm an amateur fresh-water aquarist looking at the problem of nitrate reduction (into largely-inert nitrogen gas) in a small-scale aquarium environment. The process of turning the byproducts of fish ...
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11 views

Function of NEZHA gene [closed]

What is the function of NEZHA? What effect does it have on microtubules and PLEKHA7? What happens after it has been knocked down?
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36 views

Earliest to use media after autoclaving?

I am autoclaving media to use later to inoculate yeast. How much time do I have to wait before using the media and adding the culture? Can I use it a few hours after autoclaving?
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18 views

How would one identify cellular transcription factors associated with a viral protein in a treated cell line?

I've been working as the computer guy for a microbiology lab for the past few months. I've always been interested in bench work, but my wet lab experience is rather limited and thus so is my ...
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28 views

Lifeforms concentrations of the categories of macromolecules, and Lipids

Lifeforms are formed of large, modular, organic molecules called macromolecules, large organic molecules called Lipids, and simpler molecules such as H2O. Macromolecules are commonly grouped into the ...
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23 views

Tardigrade genetic acceptance and experimentation?

Does this property of tardigrades, that when under extreme conditions they are more permeable and more easily accept sections of genes developed in other species, as I understand sometimes transfered ...
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60 views

Can tardigrades survive being eaten?

Compared to a tardigrade, the cockroach seems fragile. But can tardigrades survive the acidic environment of being eaten by most animals?
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34 views

Bacteria surviving a β-lactam antibiotic

What changes can occur in the cell wall of a bacteria for it to survive a β-lactam antibiotic? I think that because a bacteria possesses peptidoglycan in its cell wall, they are β-lactam sensitive, ...
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24 views

NMDS analysis - weird plots

I ran a NMDS analysis on 16S tag sequencing data on three different 16S regions, and would like to establish the regression coefficients (R, p) from this. All the data is stored within a combination ...
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14 views

using bioreactors for bacteria and yeasts

I have some questions about the OD to inoculate in a bioreactor and the OD for the induction using bacteria and yeasts (Pichia pastoris) to produce recombinant proteins. Which is the OD for the ...
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3answers
366 views

Why do bacteria die in a high sugar content environment?

I was reading some questions in the test bank. Then in Chapter 27, I wonder why the answer is A. (undergo death by plasmolysis). Is the high concentration of sugar that kills them or the effects of ...
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1answer
124 views

Which literature/study/myth spurred the idea that urine is sterile?

There is a seemingly unfounded mantra that a person's urine is sterile who is not suffering from a UTI. So far I have found convincing evidence to the contrary; urine is not sterile. This poster ...
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477 views

How is a bacterial strain defined?

When a species of bacteria is referred to by its strain, are they a clone of single founder or is a certain amount variation allowed?
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27 views

30s ribosomal Inhibitor (Antibiotic)Question

I have a question regarding the mode of action of 30s ribosomal Inhibitors (antibiotcs) - tetracyclines. According to some online resources, the antibiotics enter the A-site, which prevents other tRNA ...
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How to identify genes in Ralstonia that synthesize PHB and promote granule formation?

The compound polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is of considerable industrial interest as a biodegradable substitute for plastic. PHB is synthesized from glycerol by the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha. PHB ...
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1answer
41 views

How long can you effectively store a glycerol stock at -20 degrees Celsius?

I know that glycerol stocks are typically kept in a -80 °C freezer, however there are some people who do not have access to such equipment. How long would you be able to keep a glycerol stock at ...
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25 views

How do microbes develop resistance to anitmicrobial peptides?

I would like to better understand how bacteria use the "strategy" of alternations to lipid A and membrane proteins in order to resist antimicrobial peptides of the immune system? It is my ...
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40 views

Of people who develop Alzheimer disease, are those people genetically predisposed to it?

I have read a lot lately about microbiological pathogens that are found in blood vessels in the brain of patient's with Alzheimer disease (positive association). So, I am confused whether there are ...
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61 views

How to obtain virus samples?

I'm trying to observe the behavior of simple viruses in different environments. I'm just looking for simple viruses like the common cold and the flu virus nothing major. Is there a way to obtain them?
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74 views

How exactly are petri dishes used (e.g. in medicine)? [closed]

I know that petri dishes with a growth medium are used to grow micro organisms. I guess this works as follows: The petri dish has to be kept sterile. To make it easier, I guess one could cool it. ...
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Can Biologists identify all viruses?

I went to the doctor today with my girlfriend, and the doctor said that she had a virus but doesn't know which one and she should let the infection heal with some rest. The fact that the doctor didn'...
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62 views

What is the advantage of using plant-derived antibacterials rather than bacteria-derived antibacterials?

So obviously we have a big problem with antibiotic resistance. Most of our antibiotics originate from bacteria themselves (or are synthetic variations on scaffolds which originate from bacteria). I ...
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35 views

How do cell repair mechanism ratios change as they age?

I have seen that embryonic stem cells are shown to use homologous repair for double strand breaks rather then non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). [1] I am wondering if something also happens to a cell'...
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16 views

Microbiology- Pseudomonas aeruginosa, BSAC data

I tested Pseudomonas aeruginosaagainst various antibiotics, using Stokes and Kirby-Bauer. When I compared my results with BSAC data it was completely different (understandable) but why for a lot of ...
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31 views

Values of Miu_max and Ks from parameter estimation?

Background I have this simple biomass growth model: $$ \mu = \mu_{max}\cdot \left(\frac{S}{K_S+S}\right) \cdot \left(\frac{1}{1+S/K_{iS}}\right) \cdot \left(\frac{K_{iP}}{K_{iP}+P}\right) \\ \frac{...
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1answer
548 views

Relationship between turgor pressure and osmotic pressure?

I would like to know if there is a relationship between osmotic pressure (inside and outside of a cell) and turgor pressure. If so, is there a way to formalize it mathematically? Thank you in advance,...
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Experimental Analysis: What are possible reasons for this increase in N₂O production?

My professor wanted us to each conduct an experiment for class on something we thought would interesting. My experiment was very simple, but I'm not sure how to interpret my results. (Please note that ...
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How would substances that have anti bacterial characteristics interact with yeast? [closed]

This question has its origins at home brewers where the question was asked how would substances with anti bacterial qualities interact with yeast a fungus? No one at home brewers was really sure so I ...
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279 views

difference between “Petri dishes” and “Petri plates”? [closed]

In microbiology, we often hear "we use Petri dishes to prepare our cultural media". Which is correct — "Petri dishes" or "Petri plates"?
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1answer
338 views

How sterile is working next to a bunsen burner?

When I was still doing lab work, many people would just wear gloves and work next to a bunsen burner because the clean benches were all in use. This was mostly for plating bacteria like Bacillus ...
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348 views

Can bacteria release free DNA into their environment?

Natural transformation AKA natural competence involves the uptake of DNA into a competent bacterium (for horizontal gene transfer or as a food source). My question is about where this extracellular ...
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129 views

Why does chlorination still work?

Chlorination has been used for over a century to disinfect water supplies. Why haven't microorganisms evolved immunity to this chlorine by now?
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72 views

Favored Conditions of Bacterial Growth

I have read that bacteria "thrive" in warm places. Naturally, I am very interested in why this is the case. Humans for instance thrive also in relatively warm conditions if it's too cold or too warm ...
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Why a particular species of bacteria give rise to particular type of colony? [closed]

Bacterial colony varies in form, elevation, margin, opacity, chromogenesis etc. What gives definite character to a colony and what is the source of all the diversity? Is the reason similar to that of ...
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1answer
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Why would a bacterial population show initial growth when it is in unfavorable growth conditions?

This figure shows the anaerobe E. faecalis grown in aerobic conditions, E. coli grown in restricted conditions that are not specified. Why do they show an increase in abundance initially? The black ...
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18 views

What exactly are polyphenols and what benefits do they provide to humans?

I say somewhere that they are antioxidants, but I was wondering if the two terms are synonymous or if that is just one of many things polyphenols can do.
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142 views

Two different sized colonies from the same species of bacteria. What does it mean? [closed]

I have got two different sized colonies in a plate of Salmonella Paratyphi, identified by biochemical methods. What does two different sized colonies mean? What kind of question can I investigate in ...
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Why is 70% ethanol preferred for aseptic techniques?

Are other concentrations (say 80%) less effective,or is this just for convenient manufacturing? Is the concentration chosen only because it is less volatile than 100 percent ethanol and hence safer?
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69 views

How do you interpret this microbiology/ bacteriology research figure?

This is a figure from a research article that I am to do a senior presentation for. It is showing bacterial replication of an enteric bacteria population. The researchers hypothesize that the number ...
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2answers
342 views

Difference between protozoa, protists, protoctista?

Are these different classes of organisms or simply different names for the same?
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1answer
84 views

Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?

I have thrown a dirty spoon after eating some pasta into one of my desk drawers (doesn't do me much honor). It stayed there for around a year. My house is warm and I think there is enough humidity for ...
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Plasmid choosing

To design a experiment in feeding of C. elegans. It has to choose a plasmid vector to insert the gene of interest that can feed to C. elegans. Many paper are using pL4440 for the feeding vector, ...