Microbiology is the study of organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. This includes organisms like bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and others.

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What is a good source that will help me classify protists?

I am a 15 year old that enjoys looking at the micro world. The only issue that I have is that I can't find a good online source that will help me classify the name of the micro organism that I'm ...
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148 views

Why would yeast grow but not produce alcohol?

I'm studying for my intro to microbiology test and I have a question asking why a culture of yeast responsible for producing alcohol would be growing, but not producing alcohol? The multiple choice ...
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402 views

What do you call a virus when it's cured?

When a cure has been found for a virus, can it be called such anymore? Virus implies it's something you've contracted that you just have to live with until (hopefully) your body can overwhelm and ...
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998 views

What is this microscopic image from Peter Gabriel's New Blood album cover?

This image appears on the cover of Peter Gabriel's album New Blood. It appears to be a photograph of some microscopic biological cell. But it doesn't look like a blood cell to me. What kind of ...
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59 views

Is there any way the food industry can benefit from biofilms?

I realize all of the disadvantages, but I am wondering if the food industry can actually benefit from the formation of biofilms.
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72 views

How do Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus precipitate the curd of swiss cheese?

I learned in my food microbiology class that Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus precipitate the curd of swiss cheese. However, I was wondering what type of mechanisms do these ...
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169 views

Answer the questions in one word with help of clues and images given [closed]

Name the things associated with Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek - (6 pictures are given for help and four of them are associated with these clues) a)Leeuwenhoek was the first to describe these and hence ...
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58 views

Did the Britons 100 years ago have different intestinal flora and fauna?

Note: this is not a question about history, but about human digestive system over time :) I know a lot of colleagues who traveled for business trips to India. All of them caught terrible diarrhea ...
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90 views

Fermentation to acetic acid

How much time is needed for the fermentation to acetic acid production cycle, and the conversion of apple vinegar in a sealed container incubated at 37 °C? Should be in the fully closed? What is ...
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350 views

Does “Garbage Enzyme cleaner” contain cleaning enzymes?

There are many recipes which call for using fruit peel fermentation process to make a concentrated enzyme cleaner solution, some variations call to add bakers yeast. So the question arises that does ...
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Switch gut microbiota due to diet and effect on calorie uptake

I have seen peer-reviewed papers mentioning the daily changes in gut microbiota composition according to dietary changes. See for example this paper: http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/7/R89 My ...
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69 views

What does it mean to perform in vitro experiments with mutant bacteria?

I came across the following sentence while reading the paper: Nanchen, Annik, et al. "Cyclic AMP-dependent catabolite repression is the dominant control mechanism of metabolic fluxes under glucose ...
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164 views

What is this fuzzy, black fungus that grew on my plates in the 4⁰C room? [closed]

I often find the fungus below growing on my (ostensibly) sterile plates in the 4⁰C room. Presumably it takes a few days to reach this size. The colony looks puffy and dimpled in the middle, like a ...
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132 views

If someone were to die on the moon, would their body decay?

I heard that the footprints of Neil Armstrong are still there, so I was wondering if someone were to die there, would they remain preserved, too? If not how long would it take for them to decay?
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77 views

What is the expected effect of pH on the activity of a fungal pectinase?

I am working on an enzyme assay for a fungal pectinase.I assayed the enzyme in different buffers from pH 1-12.5 However,the enzyme has good activities starting from pH1-10.5. Is it possible to have ...
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59 views

Rhizosphere vs. Endorhiza?

In microbiology and the naming of the various areas of the plant as it relates to microbial inhabitance, I am confused as to the difference between the terms endorhiza and rhizosphere. In this case I ...
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444 views

What is the mechanism of oxygen uptake in E. coli?

How does E. coli uptake oxygen? Most of the literature I found is concerned with response to oxygen level supplied in the medium, as opposed to how much is actually transported inside. Can they shut ...
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1answer
96 views

Is there a difference between drinking water straight from the tap compared to leaving it to sit?

An idle question - if a glass if filled from the tap and consumed immediately, it contains some dissolved oxygen from the physical process of moving through the pipes & tap. If left out ...
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38 views

Can a plate with incompletely filled LB agar be used?

I am falling short of LB agar plates and I have a plate with less LB agar poured. I meant, the plate is not fully filled with the agar (it was the last plate I poured the medium into). Some part of ...
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199 views

DpnI over-digestion

We have a long protocol that we are optimizing that includes DpnI digestion of a PCR product (to remove any of the template DNA if it's methylated, and while we're not certain in the blind tests, ...
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97 views

Consumption of NAD+ in glycolysis

Out of 10 steps in glycolysis, only one reaction- Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (PGP), uses NAD+ and thereby producing NADH. Furthermore, this very step is solely ...
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91 views

Organisms in food deposits

I have just discovered that my kitchen sink pipe has been leaking for quite some time (possibly months) which has resulted in water and food deposits collecting in my cupboard. I smeared some of the ...
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3k views

Calculation of the bacterial growth rate from a spectrophotomer growth curve

Typically the microbial growth in liquid cultures is monitored by turbidity. Data is obtained with a spectrophotometer to measure optical density at 600nm. The slope of the bacterial kinetic curve in ...
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60 views

Can we attack viruses by attaching proteins and such to their shells?

Haven't looked into this to very long, but an initial search didn't return anything. HIV uses certain co-receptors to enter our cells. Could we flood the blood stream with specially designed ...
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29 views

What is the specific use of a capsule in E.coli?

In evolutionary terms, will the capsule cease to exist someday or will it improve ? Does it provide any boost to the organism in any way which harms us ? Can't we remove capsules or engineer E.coli ...
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489 views

What happens to lactic acid I eat?

Let's say I drink some Kefir Milk, what happens to the lactic acid in the Kefir Milk that has entered my digestive system?
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77 views

Scale up of Bacterial growth from 250mL to 1-5L?

I am currently growing up a specific strain of E.Coli with a knockout in 40mL of growth medium (LB) in a 250mL shaker flask... My ultimate goal is to scale up this process to a 1-5L large scale setup ...
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40 views

Re-solidify disturbed agar plates

I am stuck in trouble while pouring LB agar onto my petri dishes. I had to add kanamycin to my plates just before it started to solidify, out of forgetfulness, which I tried to mix using the tip. The ...
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268 views

How many different protein coding genes are in the Human Biome?

There are approximately 20k protein-coding genes found in the human genome. This number is presumably very small when considering all the genomes found in the diverse microbes associated with the ...
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174 views

How does sucrose protect bacterial cells in lysozyme solutions?

I have a microbiology question. When we put bacterial cells in sucrose solution with concentration higher than 0.5M we observe plasmolysis - the cytoplasmic membrane detaches from the cell wall due ...
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106 views

Sugar as a defence against bacteria?

An answer on another SE site mentions that sugar "at a certain level acts as a preservative". I've always been taught that microorganisms eat sugar and expel acids, that is why sugary food are ...
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76 views

What is Mycoplasma Lyo medium?

Used for instance in this article The role of genital mycoplasmas as pathogens - - are generally neglected by diagnostic laboratories in the United Kingdom, possibly due to the lack of a ...
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1answer
71 views

Prokaryotic Ribosomes

During bacterial protein synthesis, when ribosomes attach to the cytoplasmic membrane and form a polysome, to what molecule are the ribosomes attaching? Is the polysome held to the cytoplasmic ...
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70 views

Science experiments at home with Minimal Cost

What is a good recipe for making agar at home for a minimal cost? Are there materials that could be found in the kitchen cabinet?
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71 views

How do penicillin resistant bacteria grow slower in the presence of penicillin?

We put 2 flasks inoculated with Bacillus cereus in 37⁰C: one with 100μg/ml penicillin + 50μg/ml chloramphenicol and the other without penicillin. We found that the OD is higher in the one without the ...
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240 views

Anaerobic respiration choice in E. coli

Under anaerobic conditions E. coli has two options to generate ATP: fermentation (substrate-level phosphorylation), and respiration (proton gradient, chemisomotic phosphorylation). Which is favored? ...
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73 views

Are Lambic beers the product of quorum sensing?

Lambic beers are a Belgian specialty which is still made by open-air "inoculation" by airborne microbiota first, followed by additional yeasts, LAB bacteria and more joining in at the time of ...
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1answer
27 views

Can Rubella virus pass into brain stem?

B19 virus (about 20 nm) can; which I think is partially because of its small size; not sure of genomics has something to do with the passing. Rubella's (also called German measles) size is then again ...
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1answer
75 views

Can Alzheimer's disease be caused by Slow Prion infection?

I found this claim in my study materials with explanation of amyloi plaques, in comparison to CJD (Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease). Its characteristic are Long doubling time of at least 5.2 days (I ...
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1answer
72 views

How does the MMR vaccine affect lymph nodes in preventing measles?

I am trying to understand this statement about the Measles part of the MMR (Mumps, Measles and Rubella) vaccine Measles prevention: MMR (AB protect during primary and secondary viremia) Measles ...
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206 views

What is “bacto” peptone?

Standard recipes for yeast medium often include "bacto-peptone". Is this the same as bacteriological peptone? Is there an authoritative source that spells it out?
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Regulation of Cra protein level in E coli

Catabolite Activator/Repressor, Cra protein (formerly known as Fructure Repressor FruR) plays a significant role in central carbon metabolism of E coli. Its activity is inhibited by ...
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58 views

Tc and Th1 interaction and viral immune response

Tc is T cell which can give T killer cells and T helper cells. T helper cells (Th1) see the pathogen presented by antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages). They then secrete antigens ...
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47 views

Vitamin D oral intake, transportation and absorption

Several factors affecting vitamin D and its active form absorption and storage acidity of stomach (not significant effect) cytopathic effects of viruses cytopathic effects of bacteria where the ...
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1answer
49 views

Any forms of pneumonia that can be caught?

I am aware of the fact that there are several different types of pneumonia. However, I am wondering if any of these types of pneumonia are contagious from person to person. Is this possible?
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31 views

To have TBE vaccine during allergic times with mild asthmatic symptoms?

My assistant says that if you have asthmatic symptoms you cannot have TBE (Tick Born Encephalitis) vaccine, although you are living in the active zone of TBE. Cases mild allergic symptoms allergic ...
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92 views

Is a sequential double transformation acceptable?

Standard protocol states having two compatible vectors being transformed simultaneously during the same procedure. I've come across a situation in which transforming one vector, obtaining results, and ...
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1answer
124 views

How do Gram + bacteria use a proton gradient for F-type ATPase?

Does anyone know of any papers showing how Gram positive Fermiculates or Actinobacteria use a H+ gradient for an F-type ATPase, It seems impossible since there is no outer LPS membrane to maintain ...
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31 views

Can inhibition of lymphocytes migration be a direct cause of chronic inflammation?

Here is the original slide: I am thinking about the "cord factor" sentence in a more general case. Assume you inhibit Leucocytes migration. How does this lead to accumulation of macrophages in the ...
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37 views

Cells created using differently aligned proteins

I remember reading that scientist were making cells (I assume bacteria), that used differently oriented proteins to create a whole new class of life. Because apparently right and left aligned proteins ...