Microbiology is the study of organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. This includes organisms like bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and others.

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Rhizosphere vs. Endorhiza?

In microbiology and the naming of the various areas of the plant as it relates to microbial inhabitance, I am confused as to the difference between the terms endorhiza and rhizosphere. In this case I ...
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What is this fuzzy, black fungus that grew on my plates in the 4C room?

I often find the fungus below growing on my (ostensibly) sterile plates in the 4C room. Presumably it takes a few days to reach this size. The colony looks puffy and dimpled in the middle, like a ...
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Can someone explain the color-changing unit (CCU) to me?

I've been physically carrying out serial tenfold dilutions on samples of Ureaplasma to work out the color-changing units (CCU). As a definition, the CCU is the highest dilution at which there is a ...
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Image Processing Suite for bacterial microscopy: Schnitzcells or MicrobeTracker?

I am looking to start doing some work tracking the size and growth of individual bacterial cells in the microscope. In order to analyze the images I need software that can segment the cells, ...
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Shortest route for a Nitrogen atom from fossil fuel to a protein in your body?

Millions of years ago fossil fuels originated from plants. A nitrogen atom from fossil fuel is now inside in a protein molecule in your body. What is the shortest path that the nitrogen atom ...
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Why do fresh cavities form from the margins of sliver amalgam fillings on teeth?

Silver amalgam fillings predominantly contain silver a known bactericidal agent and mercury which a known toxin and has bactericidal property. So how is it that the plaque bacteria survive near the ...
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Elevated transaminases after blood transfusion?

This sparks HCV immediately in my mind. However, there may be other possibilities too. What can you deduce from elevated transaminases if you only know that the healthy adult patient received blood ...
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Endophytic Xylariaceae: diversity and taxonomy inferred from rDNA sequence analyses

"Thailand is considered as one of the areas containing a high percentage of unknown taxa of Xylariaceae (Rogers 2000). In Thailand, several studies on endophytic fungi have been documented, namely, ...
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How is the appropriately-stratified gut microbiome acquired in organisms performing horizontal transmission?

I am studying horizontal transmission of primary symbionts in insect reproduction. This reminded me of an earlier question I had asked, in which I learned that humans analogously acquired their ...
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fermentation to acetic acid

How many time need for swich fermentation to acetic acid production cycle , and the conversion of apple vinegar in a sealed container incubated at 37 ° C ? Should be in the fully closed? What is ...
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Genetically modified Klebsiella Planticola nearly bulldozers plant life as we know it?

The article "The Bacterium That (Almost) Ate the World" by Elaine Ingham (see also here or here) describes a genetically modified bacterium that would break down cellulose plant matter into alcohol: ...
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What is Mycoplasma Lyo medium?

Used for instance in this article The role of genital mycoplasmas as pathogens - - are generally neglected by diagnostic laboratories in the United Kingdom, possibly due to the lack of a ...
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Regulation of Cra protein level in E coli

Catabolite Activator/Repressor, Cra protein (formerly known as Fructure Repressor FruR) plays a significant role in central carbon metabolism of E coli. Its activity is inhibited by ...
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Vitamin D oral intake, transportation and absorption

Several factors affecting vitamin D and its active form absorption and storage acidity of stomach (not significant effect) cytopathic effects of viruses cytopathic effects of bacteria where the ...
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How are lophotrichous flagella of helicobacter pylori produced?

I am thinking the mechanism is something like first adhesins (mucinase). Howevever, this does not seem to be enough. How are the flagella of H. pylori produced?
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What are current abiogenesis hypotheses for first food source?

What is the very first abiogenetic piece of reproducing life (small piece of RNA + ribosome that randomly occurred?) hypothesized to have used as an energy source? I'd be interested in sources to what ...
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Bacterial 16S rRNA PCR amplification with universal primers

I am doing an experiment to amplify the 16S rRNA gene from bacteria present in gut contents of fish. After extracting DNA, I perform one-step PCR with universal bacterial primers (27F, 1492R) and I ...
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What are the ingredients of Pheromone Trap using for controlling Fruit flies of cucumber?

Pheromone Traps are used for fruit fly control. But I have no idea which ingredients or chemicals are used for preparing Pheromone trap
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Improving throughput of CFU plating?

In a separate question I've described my general experimental setup where I need to measure the number of live cells in a growing bacterial culture in a fairly rapid and high-throughput manner. In ...
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algae lamp questions?

I would be wondering if you help me if you know about algae lamps please give me detail about it and answer my questions This is my questions? how the algae will charge the battery in day?(process) ...
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What are some readily available, easy to test, bacteria?

I want to do a science fair experiment about how bacteria interact with 5-carbon vs. 6-carbon sugars, and I want a bacteria that is easy to test and is readily available. Any ideas?
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What are the characteristic structures of bacillus M. tuberculosis and what they cause?

I answered to this question: In most forms of the disease, the bacillus M. tuberculosis spreads slowly and widely in the lungs, causing the formation of hard nodules (tubercles) in the ...
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Can antiviral antibodies help viral infections which has many serotypes?

For instance Dengue virus has four serotypes. Infection by a different serotype causes only a more serious infection. 2) Which are the most common virus infections that has many serotypes?
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Looking for detailed nutrient/energy flow at the bottom of the freshwater food chain

I am trying to model the production and consumption of nutrients and waste at the bottom of the food chain in freshwater ecosystems. I can only find broad information on the Internet and don't know ...
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Solid phase use in HIV rapid tests

I have another question in regards to my HIV test research. The rapid tests like Orasures Oraquick contains a strip of synthetic peptides that are used to represent proteins found in the envelope ...
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Where can I find approximate rates of sequestration of CO2 for different species of algae?

For a study, I want to compare the rates of CO2 sequestration and fixation of a few different species of algae. I could not find any data on the sequestration rates. Any pointers to where I can find ...
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muscle contractions cell biology questions?

An increase in cAMP/PKA always results in muscle contractions. In smooth muscle contraction, calcium binds to troponin. Stimulation of adrenergic beta receptors on smooth muscles cause muscle ...
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Switch gut microbiota due to diet and effect on calorie uptake

I have seen peer-reviewed papers mentioning the daily changes in gut microbiota composition according to dietary changes. See for example this paper: http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/7/R89 My ...
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Locally sterile immune response in paradoxical IRS coupled with hypersensitivity I

The king of sterile immune response is antibodies; while in unsterile response - T lymphocyte. I think there can be two types of IRS: either abnormalities with T or B cells. Assume the here the case ...
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Can cyclical fever be connected with Balantidium coli?

This is a theoretical question about what can cause cyclical fever with B.coli infection. Lifecycle here from Dickson book: I am not sure if B. coli can cause cyclical fever itself. There is ...
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Direct spread of Parvovirus B19 from blood to Brain stem and CSF

Parvovirus can spread in blood (viremia) to bone marrow. It is detected in some stages of infection in Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, I am thinking if it can spread directly with facilitated ...
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What is the relation between HBeAG and Anti-HBc

I am analysing this picture about acute hepatitis, viral infection of HBV, where are standard antibodies and antigens of HBV: HBsAg serum antigen HBeAg some antigen in blood anti-HBc antibody in ...
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44 views

Capsule and Antiphagocytosis as a pathogenesis factor

I am thinking the pathogenesis factor (capsule) of Pseudomonas aeruginose as an example: antiphagocytosis $\to$ anti antibodies (I think AB is antibodies) and complement; anbiotics ...
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How to start Diagnostics of Enterobacteriaceae?

I am thinking what is the Diagnostics for Enterobacteriacea and particularly Shigella, Yersinia, Vibrio, Campylobacteriacea, Helicobacter pylori, salmonella and Proteus. I got today advice that start ...
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Replication of DNA in E. coli: what are DARS and RIDA?

I understand what is DnaA, its role in replication and the fact that it's only active when binding ATP. I don't understand what are DARS and RIDA and how they control the amount of DnaA-ATP:DnaA-ADP
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Wheat anthracnose outbreaks caused by Colletotrichum cereale in the USA

"Wheat anthracnose outbreaks caused by C. cereale were problematic during the 1940s in the USA, but presently do not limit production of this crop, despite the fact that the fungus still inhabits ...