1
vote
0answers
25 views

Assembling DNA fragments with ~10kb overlap in vitro

Let's say I have two fragments of bacterial DNA (~50kb in length each) that overlap on the ends by roughly ~10kb; the overlap sequences are unknown. I would like to assemble these into longer ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Heterochromatin production limitations

Currently playing with some ideas for a project and needed some guidance. I am wondering, both in Drosophila melanogaster and in general, is the amount of heterochromatin a cell/nucleus can produce ...
4
votes
2answers
73 views

Detecting food fraud

There's undoubtedly more than one way to do this, but if a DIY biologist were to attempt to detect food fraud (e.g. as done by students from Stanford University and Trinity School, Manhattan with ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Study case of the inheritance system of Oenothera

I've been told some interesting facts about oenothera. Apparently in this species some lineages have been through some translocations and in results to these translocations and in consequence, some ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Property of E.coli harboring F element

From Genetics by Ursula Goodenough E.coli harboring an F element are endowed with a number of phenotypic traits : 1.They are sensitive to infection by ssRNA phages and certain ssDNA phages. ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

Transport of mammalian insulin in vivo

What is the mechanism for transport of insulin in mammalian cells?
1
vote
2answers
62 views

How does promoter sequence affect initiation?

I don't know if this might have been highlighted in recent research, but a textbook I have states that "the exact way in which promoter sequence affects [transcription] initiation is unclear" I'm ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Transposons and the net amount of DNA

The retrotransposons and certain DNA-transposons, are "jumping" sequences which may be incorporated elsewhere in the genomic DNA of an organism, through varying mechanisms. This insertion is almost ...
2
votes
1answer
496 views

Lyonization and X-linked disorders?

Lyonization or X-chromosome inactivation is the conversion of all but one, X-chromosomes in Females into non-coding heterochromatin (i.e. deactivated) leading to the formation of one or more Barr ...
7
votes
2answers
361 views

What exactly happens if during translation, an amino acid is not present?

Lets say that the cell wants to make a particular protein. Transcription of the appropriate gene is done and the mRNA is made. mRNA attaches to the ribosome and the translation is initiated in a ...
2
votes
0answers
120 views

Can Pfx polymerase add only one 3' A overhang?

I am trying to clone a PCR product that was amplified using Pfx polymerase into pGemT vector. I had to A-tail the PCR product using Taq polymerase since Pfx only generates blunt end products. My ...
3
votes
2answers
75 views

How does the DNA know which chain has error in repairing?

As we know, the DNA has more stability than RNA, if one chain has broken or accidentally distorted, it can be repaired by the other one. Suppose there is a segment AGTC, its peer is GACT. Now its ...
2
votes
2answers
119 views

Prenatal Marketing

This is for a short story idea. Is it possible to modify the DNA of a child to make their metabolism more susceptible (physical response, addiction, etc) to a certain type of chemical i.e. a chemical ...
3
votes
3answers
793 views

Knockdown of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) - how is it done?

I don't work at the wet lab and don't know all the details about the knockdown techniques. My question is: How lncRNA knockdown is done? For example - you have lncRNA that is functional in the ...
1
vote
1answer
291 views

What is solid-phase bridge amplification?

During Illumina sequencing there is a step called bridge amplification by which DNA is amplified by isothermal enzymes. What is this stage, and how does it work?
5
votes
2answers
3k views

What's the difference between shotgun sequencing and clone based sequencing?

What are the main differences between shotgun sequencing and clone based sequencing?
2
votes
1answer
124 views

Histone marks mechanism

I am slightly confused about the mechanisms that makes histone modifications associate with gene expression. That is, H3K36me3 is believed to be present in actively transcribed genes, H3K27me3 in ...
5
votes
5answers
269 views

What is the lowest common denominator of cancer?

What is the lowest level attribute that all cancers share? Also, what is the highest level attributes that all cancers share?
6
votes
1answer
102 views

Bicoid regulation of hunchback

I'm learning about development via the example of Drosophila embryogenesis. I understand that bicoid regulates hunchback, among other genes. My question whether the regulation is direct or indirect? ...
10
votes
2answers
294 views

What is the highest competency possible for E coli?

I am looking to find a highly competent E coli strain. I am making a library of a ~6.6kb plasmid and I am not getting high enough efficiency. Does anyone have a suggestion of a strain/protocol with ...
19
votes
1answer
364 views

Regulation of chromatin structure

Recently, I reviewed the different levels of chromatin structure. The primary level is nucleosomes, where DNA is bound to histones, and has structural similarity to "beads on a string." The secondary ...
10
votes
1answer
305 views

What is the functional and structural distinction between core (H2A, H2B, H3,H4) and linker(H1/H5) histones?

Many explanations of histone biochemistry isn't quite elucidating for the undergraduate student. How does histone structure (dimers, octomers) relate to their specific functions as core or linker ...