The study of the molecular processes of the nucleus and cell function.

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Does blood typing still provide a use for ancient tissue analysis?

Modern techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing has become extremely cheap. This, compounded by the ability to PCR miniscule samples to viable samples for analysis, means that aDNA can be ...
2
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2answers
45 views

How can 3' end polyadenylation protect cellular RNA from ribonuclease degridation?

In this link, it states: It is worth noting that all intracellular RNAs are protected from RNase activity by a number of strategies including 5' end capping, 3' end polyadenylation, and folding ...
7
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1answer
74 views

Double stranded nucleic acids are more 'durable' than single stranded nucleic acids?

I'm struggling with a question I've been asked. "Why is double stranded genetic material more 'durable' than single stranded one?" I know that double stranded genetic material is more stable due to ...
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1answer
30 views

What is meant by clonal isolates?

With respect to this website: http://horfdb.dfci.harvard.edu/ what does the term clonal isolates mean?
3
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0answers
80 views

Storing Taqman plates with polymerase in fridge before running

I'm going to be running some Taqman assays on cDNA generated from RNA collected from various samples, and will end up running a bunch of plates (right now the setup is 1/2 a plate per sample, ...
2
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1answer
26 views

Which is the guideline to choose a molecular target to identify vertebrate hosts from arthropod bloodmeals?

There are some molecular targets to identify vertebrate hosts from arthropod bloodmeals including the Cyt b gene and the COI gene. Which are the standards or characteristics that I have to bear in ...
8
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2answers
28k views

What is the function of the RNA primer in DNA replication?

During DNA replication, RNA primase puts an RNA primer in the lagging strand. What is the function of this RNA primer? Why can't the enzymes put DNA fragments directly?
3
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2answers
41 views

Macrophages and what they consume

Do macrophages in the dermis consume any foreign invader to the body, or simply pathogens and cellular debris? For example, would macrophages consume vitamins or medications injected into the dermal ...
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0answers
28 views

What will happen to transcription if histone acetyltransferases are removed from a eukaryotic cell?

If HATs are destroyed in a eukaryotic cell, how will gene expression level be affected? Will all gene expression be affected or just be slowed down and most gene will still be expressed?
0
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1answer
39 views

(Genetics) Is a silencer the same as gene silencing (heterochromatin)?

Is silencer the same as gene silencing? I know that gene silencing refers to those heterochromatin concentrated at the telomeres or centromere. It is also related to methylation. But what about a ...
10
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2answers
7k views

Why is PEG important for efficient yeast transformation?

One way to do an yeast transformation is by using lithium acetate, a single-stranded carrier DNA, and PEG (1). I was wondering why is the polyethylene glycol important for the efficient ...
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0answers
25 views

What is a “NuMA protein”?

I just got out of a lecture on mitosis and this part was incredibly confusing. After searching my textbook it doesn't cover it that well either. The professor mentioned a NUMA protein that is ...
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0answers
51 views

Importance of organic chemistry in biochemistry/molecular biology? [closed]

I'm halfway through my biochemistry and molecular biology degree in Australia and i'm concerned about a lack of organic chemistry. My friends studying biochemistry back home in Canada take units upon ...
1
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2answers
103 views

What is the importance of urea in mass spectrometry?

What is the importance of urea in mass spectrometry? We use 8M urea to FASP our proteins prior to mass spectrometry. What is the significance of using 8M urea? and how does it affect the proteins?
3
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2answers
70 views

Need help in codon optimization

I want to chemically synthesize a GFP gene for expressing in rice.I am using the IDT Codon Optimization program and found that not all the codons are 100% optimized. Some of them are the 2nd or 3rd in ...
5
votes
1answer
65 views

Is it possible to express a mutant gene only in a specific tissue?

Imagine that someone tries to develop a knockout mouse for a gene, but this result in lethality for the homozygous. Is it possible to express that mutant gene only in a specific tissue of interest to ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Repair of cloning vector nicks digested with antarctic phosphatase and ligated with T4 enzyme

The vector product obtained by ligation between a vector previously digested with antarctic phosphatase lacks 5' phosphate groups. T4 ligase can ligate it to an insert with complementary sticky ends ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Reliability of Sanger sequencing

Hailed as the "gold standard" of sequencing, I was wondering to what Sanger sequencing owes its incredible accuracy to. If possible, I would like a quantification of the accuracy (because I doubt it ...
2
votes
1answer
320 views

Using RNA-seq to compare gene expression across patients instead of between Control and Experimental conditions

I am working with RNA-seq data from the Cancer Genome Atlas TCGA and I have been reading about how people have compared gene expression levels measured by RNA-seq. Many of the papers I have read talk ...
5
votes
1answer
51 views

Do non-enzyme catalysed reaction pathways exist?

Can their be a kind of chemical reaction pathway in a cell, that is catalyzed or regulated but NOT necessarily by enzymes? I could not find anything on Google. I have almost no background in biology, ...
4
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1answer
51 views

blue/white screening - results are opposite as expected

We inserted GFP-gene into plasmid Bluescript SK+, transformed E. coli with this construct, and then plated on an agar plate with Ampicillin and X-gal to do a blue/white screening. We got blue colonies ...
1
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1answer
34 views

What are the factors on which protein-protein interaction depend? [closed]

Does protein-protein interaction only happens when one of them is basic and the other acidic? Do protein interactions also depend on the protein structure? Are there more factors?
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0answers
15 views

OCT-1 transport in Enterocytes [closed]

Does Oct-1 transport lactate or any of its products and in which direction (intracellularly to extracellular, the opposite, or inter-nuclear). The literature talks about Oct-1's role in neuronal ...
3
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1answer
39 views

DNA length and annealing kinetics

I have a mixture plasmids and undesired short linear fragments that share the same sequences. During denaturation and annealing, I would like the plasmids to 'find each other' before annealing to the ...
10
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2answers
99 views

Do macrophages get nutritional value from the pathogens that they eat?

X-posted on reddit AskScience here. I know that macrophages engulf foreign bodies and transport them to various waste excretion pathways (sorry if the terminology is wrong), and if the foreign bodies ...
5
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0answers
71 views

SDS Laemmli Gel that did not solidify [closed]

In my lab class this week my partner and I were making a SDS-PAGE Laemmli Gel. We made the resolving gel solution which was made of 30% Acrylamide, DI water, 1.5 M Tris-HCL pH8.8, and 20% SDS. We ...
4
votes
2answers
58 views

How can (or did) Deinococcus radiodurans continue to evolve after developing resistance to mutation?

Deinococcus radiodurans has a remarkable ability to resist damage to its DNA due to radiation, dehydration or (to my knowledge) any other source. It keeps multiple copies of its genome and has a ...
2
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1answer
80 views

How to isolate host cell RNA (tRNA,mRNA,rRNA) from viral RNA?

A retrovirus with RNA genome infected a host cell. You would like to isolate the host cell’s RNA (rRNA, tRNA, and mRNA) from the virus RNA. What properties can you rely on to determine the three types ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Retrovirus Production

I have been having difficulties with low transduction efficiencies of my retrovirus production. I expand my plasmid of interest (on MiG-GFP plasmid) in DH5α E Coli for ~24 hours, purify with Qiagen ...
4
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2answers
34 views

Transformation efficiency

I accidentally spun down the cells after heat shock treatment before adding the media into the tubes while doing transformation? will the transformation work?
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0answers
22 views

Question about cytoskeleton coordination

I am trying to study for a biology and I am having some confusion over the following topic. Can anyone help explain/ shed some light on the concepts of Rho family GTPases. Is it true that we have Rho ...
1
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2answers
33 views

How does the placement of it's motor domain affect the directionality of a motor protein?

I'm going over some of my notes, and I have written down that motor proteins with + cytoskeletal directionality have a reversed schematic representation relative to - directed motor proteins. Then I ...
2
votes
2answers
59 views

What is meant by nucleated in this context?

Hi I am little confused in one of my classes; because the teacher will say that " the actin is nucleated by the ARP 2/3 complex" or "microtubles are nucleated by the centrosome". Unless I am ...
3
votes
1answer
26 views

Why introduction of an extra copy of a gene related to pigmentation causes RNA interference in Petunia?

RNAi became famous after Fire and Mello experiment in C.elegans; however, it had been observed before. In the 80's, Jorgensen was trying to increase pigmentation of Petunia flowers by introducing ...
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2answers
81 views

Why do mitochondria fuse together?

Contrary to all of the textbook images of mitochondria that I have seen over the years, I had just learned that the mitochondria within a cell form a dynamic branching network along microtubule ...
21
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4answers
2k views

How and where, in the human brain, are memories stored?

Background I am a computer programmer who is fascinated by artificial intelligence and artificial neural networks, and I am becoming more curious about how biological neural networks work. Context ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Is it possible that a set of functionally related proteins in a pathway fulfill different functions? [closed]

Could it be that a given pathway of enzymes (or proteins in general) may fulfill different purposes in a cell by for shifting partners? Say protein A activates B, B activates C and C has a specific ...
5
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1answer
64 views

MHC restricted peptide

What is an MHC restricted peptide? I got this definition from wikipaedia, but cannot exactly extract what the phrase MHC restricted peptide means. MHC-restricted antigen recognition, or MHC ...
2
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0answers
45 views

CRISPR Knock in

Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, it is possible that after inducing a DSB with the Cas9 endonuclease guided with an RNA designed by the user and using a template DNA, get a desired Knock-In (KI) by ...
4
votes
2answers
580 views

How can CI repressor both activate and repress $P_{RM}$ promoter found in $\lambda$ phage?

I'm reading a paper where the authors constructed a toggle switch that uses bidirectional $P_R/P_{RM}$ promoter found in the $\lambda$ phage. There are 3 binding sites - $O_{R1}$, $O_{R2}$, $O_{R3}$ - ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

DNA polymerase in PCR (polymerase chain reaction)

Can the DNA polymerase in PCR (polymerase chain reaction) recognize both DNA and RNA for use them as template? I want to know is it possible if my primers bind to an contaminant RNA and then any DNA ...
2
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0answers
24 views

Can encoding of miRNAs in introns not cause dysregulation of gene expression?

For example, consider a gene X which has an intron which encodes a miRNA that downregulates expression of another gene Y. When the gene X is translated, this miRNA will appear as a byproduct of ...
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0answers
27 views

Why can't some organisms match miRNA perfectly to the target mRNA like in plants? [closed]

What causes other organisms to be impaired in making perfect matches like plants do and is there a way to increase matching?
1
vote
1answer
28 views

What factors, other than its homochirality, make our “brand” of biology unique? [closed]

If humans were to discover organisms on another planet, it is supposed that (unless both we and they were seeded by the same source) we would have nothing to fear from alien pathogens, as they would ...
1
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1answer
62 views

Does DNA Ligase look for complementarity in sticky ends?

Can DNA ligase seal two non-complementary sticky ends if the reaction is incubated at the optimum conditions ? I do almost 100% double digestion in the lab. However, during ligation, when I do a ...
9
votes
1answer
171 views

RNA migrating slower than DNA on Formaldehyde Gel?

So I ran into an interesting problem. I'm getting a linear DNA band that is twice as long (4x bases, but as denatured probably only 2x) as an RNA band running at the same size in a formaldehyde gel. ...
4
votes
1answer
27 views

Oligonucleotide purification with desalting

I have ordered 36bp oligonucleotides that anneal to each other and create sticky ends to be cloned in a vector afterwards. I have tried cloning many times with different methods and I failed. Now I ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

Nomenclature of genes and proteins

With respect to this paper: Identification of Host Proteins Required for HIV Infection Through a Functional Genomic Screen In the abstract, I found names such as Rab6 and Vps35 and TNPO3. So Rab6 ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

Does mung bean nuclease cleave a phosphate group when it's chewing off 5' or 3' ssDNA ends?

I'm looking to create blunt ends from sticky ends with mung bean nuclease for subsequent ligation. Does anyone know full mechanism by which mung bean nuclease will do this? In particular after the ...
3
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2answers
46 views

Are restriction enzymes active at −20 °C?

I have digested my DNA with NotI enzyme and put it in the −20 °C freezer without heat inactivating it. Can restriction enzymes work at −20 °C? Should I expect STAR activity?