The study of the molecular processes of the nucleus and cell function.

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What are the problems in using an ssDNA or an mRNA for expression instead of using a plasmid?

Let's say you want to do a gene cloning experiment. You have an empty expression vector (mRNA or DNA) and are looking to clone some gene X into it. Why is it you can only buy X already inside a vector ...
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1answer
39 views

How RNA primer on leading strand is removed during DNA replication and how the gap is filled? [closed]

Please can you explain me how the gap created by the removal of primer on 5'-3' leading strand is filled.
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1answer
27 views

Synthesis of an additional DNA in Pachytene and Zygotene [closed]

I've read, that in Pachytene and Zygotene additional DNA material is synthesized, about 0,3, 0,1% respectively. Why is it so?
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1answer
78 views

Techniques to show a protein heterodimer-DNA interaction

It is known that c-Jun and fos dimerize to form AP1 factor that binds to a sequence on DNA containing PyPuGACGTCNNNNGAGGTCPyPU. In esophageal cancer cell lines there is no expression of the fos gene. ...
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58 views

Why does Taq polymerase add 3' adenine overhangs?

Is there a mechanism for the preference of Taq polymerase to add a non-templated 3' adenine (overhang) instead of other bases?
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32 views

Are all genes transcribed in differentiated cells?

My textbook tells me that it’s specific transcription factors that allow for a different set of genes to be expressed in different cells (differential gene expression). My book gives the example of ...
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1answer
35 views

does life make or break?

Ok, this question seems like it may be impossible to answer, but would be interesting to see if anyone has an idea. Throughout the course of a human life, do we make more molecular bonds than we ...
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1answer
19 views

Molecules, Targets and Isoforms

I have a question. Given a molecule A and two isoforms of a gene X, Y, and the knowledge that A targets X. Can I infere from this anything about whether A targets Y? As a motivation think about ...
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10 views

Are there in biololy specific QM-phenomena which are necessary for their processes?

Of course QM should be every where, because that is how nature is. But for example if you take the fusionprocess of our sun it appears that the sun wouldn't give any heat and light without making use ...
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1answer
95 views

An experiment to test if a bacterial resistance gene is on the plasmid or chromosome?

So I have an E.coli strain phenotypicall resistant to the antibiotics ampicillin and rifampicin. How do I test if the AmpR gene is carried on a plasmid and not on the chromosome? In summary, I ...
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33 views

Artificial reduction of NADP into NADPH by means of an electrical current

I've recently been attempting to artificially drive the formation of NADPH via the NADP reduction mechanism utilized by Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase in the Light-Dependent Reactions of Photosynthesis in ...
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348 views

Restriction enzymes, how are the recognition sequences determined?

How were the recognition sequences (e.g. GAATTC of EcoRI, GGATCC of BamHI) characterised? Text books only list the recognition ...
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1answer
50 views

Why does protein kinase C activated by different means have different effects?

I could be way off base but I think I remember learning that Protein Kinase C has some effects when activated by one pathway and other effects when activated by another. How does this happen? Is it ...
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175 views

Construct a restriction map of a linear fragment of DNA using the following data?

I've attempted to do the single digests, and the double digests, but cannot complete the map.... I've attached what I've done so far DNA Sizes of Fragments (bp) uncut DNA 900 DNA cut with EcoRI ...
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2answers
110 views

Is it possible to create a restriction map using python? [closed]

I have some fragments of DNA from single and double digests using three different restriction enzymes. I'm trying to construct a restriction map of a linear fragment of DNA. The map needs indicate the ...
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0answers
45 views

How can a mutator gene can cause a mutation when it is shut off? [closed]

defination of "Mutator" - a gene that increases the rate of mutation of one or more other genes. However, in the book "Molecular Biology of the Cell" (bruce alberts) it states that when a mutator is ...
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1answer
72 views

Is a bone marrow transplant limited by sex?

Can a female patient get transplanted with bone marrow of a male donor and vice versa?
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19 views

Enzyme immobilization: Factors that help or hurt success

Are there any factors to consider that can help / hurt the chance to get a successful immobilized enzyme catalyst? i.e. The relative attractiveness of a live host synthesis vs an immobilized enzyme. ...
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1answer
44 views

Lookup for transporter locations in humans

I am interested in several transporters and cotransporters (eg SLC12A1/2 and many others), more precicely, in (human) organism that are made of cells containing those transporters. So does anyone know ...
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22 views

Computer Models of E Coli / Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolite pathways

Are there mathematical models one can use to predict the expression levels of a foreign gene inserted into a well studied host organism like E Coli or S cerevisiae? I'm not, obviously, looking for ...
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0answers
18 views

codon optimization / enzyme active site improvement

Does one necessarily have to use de novo synthesis of DNA when attempting protein expression improvement by codon optimization? Or are there other ways? e.g. Say the gene coding for the enzyme needed ...
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0answers
20 views

Do you have a comprehensive protocol using xGen blocking oligo? [closed]

Specifically used with genomic DNA and to help prevent non-specific binding
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1answer
52 views

What is the P in LogP? [closed]

How does this value actually get calculated? Logarithms are usually written as log(base 10) of x So what is the 'P' equivalent of 'base 10'? I know it stands for octanol/water, but what does that ...
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1answer
75 views

What is two-start or zigzag model of 30 nm chromatin fibre?

I read some webpages describing the two-start model but could not get it. I'll be obliged if someone helped me understand the topic. The websites I have been through are: ...
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20 views

What is the site on an enzyme that binds either exitatory or inhibitory molecules? [closed]

A site on an enzyme where either exitatory or inhibitory molecules can bind is called a(n): A) electron transport site B) active site C) coenzyme D) metabolic pathway E) allosteric site If you ...
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1answer
23 views

How can dopamine modulate synaptic strength?

Does dopamine act on G protein coupled receptor, leading to more Ca2+ channels on the postsynaptic knob? Also, how is the specificity of the location (of the brain) that dopamine acts on controlled? ...
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287 views

How does the body switch between aerobic and anaerobic respiration?

Lets take the case of a person doing heavy exercise. Aerobic respiration is taking place, but oxygen is about to be finished up. Glycolysis occurs, Krebs cycle finishes. Now NADH and FADH enter ...
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65 views

How do the major and minor grooves in the DNA helix arise?

I understand that they arise due to the pairing of bases of two opposite stands and are sites through which important proteins needed for replication and transcription of DNA interact. But I don't get ...
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1answer
31 views

How to induce a steady increase in cyctoplasmic [Ca2+] in HEK293T cells? And is there any simple marker/method to confirm it?

We are trying to find out whether increase or decrease of cytoplasmic calcium concentration affects the interaction of two proteins, using co-IP in HEK293T cells as a readout. In different forums and ...
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1answer
41 views

Molecular/cellular biology textbook to consolidate what I know about molecular/cell biology

I'm a medical student (who is halfway through med school) looking for a textbook that will consolidate some of the biology I already know. While I've read a lot of books that go into great detail ...
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3answers
40 views

Statistically, why is the number of mutated genes in eggs treated with chemical mutagenesis one?

Excerpted from the Guide to Research Techniques in Neuroscience [1]: In chemical mutagenesis, a scientist applies a mutagenizing chemical, such as ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or ...
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1answer
103 views

Can bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells be destroyed by resonance?

Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer. Can the resonances by coordinated electromagnetic waves (and/or other forms of waves), of various frequencies, amplitudes and pulse rates, directed from ...
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26 views

Hydrogen bonding and the blocking thereof in nucleic acids during nuclear processes

In transcription, RNA polymerase unwinds the DNA double helix and begins attaching RNA nucleotides to the template strand. In its wake, the DNA double helix closes back—this is only natural, seeing as ...
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1answer
56 views

Does DNA polymerase I require a $3^\prime$ end?

DNA polymerase III adds nucleotides in the $5^\prime \rightarrow 3^\prime$ direction because it can only add nucleotides to the $3^\prime$ end of the previous nucleotide. This is why it requires a ...
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1answer
41 views

What's the mixture of plasma and haemoglobin called [closed]

I know of oxyhaemoglobin but the mixture of plasma and haemoglobin in the blood gives what?
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1answer
51 views

What's the mixture of carbon and haemoglobin called [closed]

I know of oxyhaemogloblin , the mixture of oxygen and haemoglobin , but carbon and haemoglobin combination is what's confusing
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17 views

Problem with phosphorylated and total forms of antibodies

Antibodies are available that can detect both phosphorylated and total endogeneous levels of the given protein. I have a question here, why is it necessary to have equal amounts of total protein? This ...
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0answers
35 views

How to cut out a specific named gene from plant DNA

Suppose one has extracted RNA from a plant, converted it to the corresponding cDNA & amplified it but now wants to cut out a particular, already-sequenced gene out from it, how does one proceed? ...
4
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1answer
64 views

Negative feedback loop and oscillations

According to the textbook Alberts Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th ed., p. 902), negative feedback loops cause oscillations when they are long delayed. I just can't figure out why. Except for ...
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1answer
27 views

Sodium hydroxide grade in library denaturation for NGS

If the NaOH, 1N which I bought does not have the label of molecular biology grade can it be used safely for library denaturation in NGS? Thank you!
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11 views

Function of NEZHA gene [closed]

What is the function of NEZHA? What effect does it have on microtubules and PLEKHA7? What happens after it has been knocked down?
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25 views

mRNA extraction from mice ears.

I am trying to extract RNA from mice ears and for some reason I don't have RNA when I perform the electrophoresis. I directly cut the ears and I put it in a tube with a bead and trizol. then I place ...
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28 views

Lifeforms concentrations of the categories of macromolecules, and Lipids

Lifeforms are formed of large, modular, organic molecules called macromolecules, large organic molecules called Lipids, and simpler molecules such as H2O. Macromolecules are commonly grouped into the ...
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2answers
39 views

What separates gene loci?

Introns are sections of noncoding DNA that separate exons within a gene locus. However, between different gene loci, I also would assume there to be noncoding regions of DNA. What are these regions ...
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88 views

Crossing over and exon shuffling?

Campbell Biology 10e, in discussing the functions of introns, writes: The presence of introns in a gene may facilitate the evolution of new and potentially beneficial proteins as a result of a ...
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2answers
38 views

Was there originally a non-ribosomal way of synthesizing proteins?

Proteins are synthesized on ribosomes from mRNA copies of regions of the DNA. But ribosomes themselves are made up of proteins (and RNA). So how could the first ribosomes have arisen? Was there ...
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21 views

XNAs as a Genetic material [closed]

I heard there is a new genetic material called XNAs.I wanted to know more about this.Does anyone about XNAs as genetic material?
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0answers
27 views

Dogs recognize eachother on sight. How come?

Is it possible that the fact that dogs regonize eachother on sight is caused in the developing embryo, wich is to say that the developing map from wich the motorcells conect to the motorsystem somehow ...
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0answers
40 views

Molecular Biology and Genetics [closed]

What's the best textbook and online courses to study Molecular biology and genetics for undergrad student?