Tagged Questions

The study of the molecular processes of the nucleus and cell function.

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0
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0answers
22 views

TAA- Tumor associated antigen

An approach to find Tumor associated antigens is based on transfection of expression library made from cDNA into cells expressing desired MHC haplotypes. Can someone please explain what this line ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

Microarray probe and target

In a microarray, which one is called a target and which one is the probe? the one that is added later , is that the probe or the one present in the slots of the microarray, that is the probe? (I have ...
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1answer
19 views

Why can't NMR be used on large RNA molecules?

While reading my Molecular Bio textbook, I came across a sentence that stated that NMR cannot be used on large RNA molecules to determine their structure. Why is this? Is it because RNA is single ...
5
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1answer
47 views

Protein Isolation from mammalian cells

What non-SDS buffer can I use to isolate protein from mammalian cells? The protein is intended for testing electron transport chain complexes.
2
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1answer
25 views

Immunodominant Peptide

Can someone please explain me the concept of Immunodominant peptide in simple language?? I did read the wiki article but did not understand it clearly. Please help! (I have not studied biology since ...
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1answer
37 views

Localization of B and T cell

What does localization of B-Cell mean?? "Localization of B and T cell in allergens may not coincide". What does this statement mean? (I have not studied biology since last 8 years and now I am going ...
1
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1answer
28 views

What is the expected effect of pH on the activity of a fungal pectinase?

I am working on an enzyme assay for a fungal pectinase.I assayed the enzyme in different buffers from pH 1-12.5 However,the enzyme has good activities starting from pH1-10.5. Is it possible to have ...
3
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1answer
40 views

Propensity Score for amino acid

What is the meaning of propensity score of amino acid? How is it calculated? (I have not studied biology since last 8 years and now I am going through it because I need it for my research. So if ...
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0answers
20 views

Bipolar minus end directed molecular motor

like the title explains I am looking for a minus end directed bipolar molecular motor. Any ideas? Best wishes.
1
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1answer
21 views

How to identify the genes that distal enhancers pair?

I am writing a project proposal and I have to talk about this problem: how to identify the genes that distal enhancers pair? I am really new to this topic and I don't know what it is all about. I ...
2
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2answers
40 views

Western Blot: Fischer ECL substrate 2:1 instead of 1:1?

i recently developed a b-actin-ab-incubated PVDF-WB-Membrane with the Thermo Scientific Pierce ECL Kit. According to the manufacterers orders i mixed Reagent 1 and Reagent 2 1:1. But unfortunately i ...
9
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1answer
98 views

When did CRISPR/Cas9 evolve and what is the likelihood that a superior system for live cell genome editing has already evolved on earth since then?

I've read that CRISPR/Cas9 is currently being implemented and tested for its ability to edit genomes in live cells, and that it is supplanting other genome editing tools in labs, such as TALENs and ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

What is a protective epitope?

What is a protective epitope? An epitope is basically a part of antigen. So does it mean that when the epitope combines with an antibody, it helps in the functioning of the antibody instead of going ...
2
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0answers
35 views

What does the term 'epitope mapping' mean? [closed]

Epitope mapping means identifying the binding site of antibodies on the target antigen. This means that the site to be identified is part of the antigen and not antibody, am I right?
6
votes
3answers
260 views

Why does replication require primers while transcription does not?

In transcription, there is no need for any primer. I guess the basic mechanism of DNA polymerase & RNA polymerase is the same. So why does replication have the need for a primer?
2
votes
1answer
90 views

Using RNA-seq to compare gene expression across patients instead of between Control and Experimental conditions

I am working with RNA-seq data from the Cancer Genome Atlas TCGA and I have been reading about how people have compared gene expression levels measured by RNA-seq. Many of the papers I have read talk ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

What is the biding site code recognized by the parts of the spliceosome

Another question about another Youtube video. At 0:50, the splicing process begins to remove the non-coding section of the DNA (intron), so the different parts of the spliceosome attach to the borders ...
6
votes
1answer
45 views

What regulates the timing of the motion of molecular machines during DNA Replication?

This question is about this video I found on Youtube. I just want to know what is the mechanism which regulates the timing of motion of the parts of these molecular machines. I know that those big ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Why do oncogenes show genetic dominance?

As we know that tumor suppressor gene causes cancer only when both the alleles are recessive in nature.But in case of oncogenes if only one allele is dominant it can cause cancer.Why in case of ...
3
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1answer
67 views

Consumption of NAD+ in glycolysis

Out of 10 steps in glycolysis, only one reaction- Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (PGP), uses NAD+ and thereby producing NADH. Furthermore, this very step is solely ...
3
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0answers
25k views

Does CPH4 exists? [closed]

I just see the film Lucy, it talks about a molecule called CPH4 which increase human capabilities. Of course it's a film and so it's not scientific facts. During an interview the producer says that ...
2
votes
4answers
83 views

determine longest poly-purine tract

how to determine/ find the longest poly-purine tract in any genome and this needs to be on the E. coli genome . is it to figure out the polypurine tract and then figure out the longest chain ? or is ...
3
votes
2answers
285 views

How are DNA segments selected in PCR?

I understand that in PCR we're able to amplify only selected portions of the DNA... however despite reading it from multiple sources, I cannot figure out how this selection actually takes place. I ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Why does the pET- expression vector contain a LacI gene additionally to the one in the genome?

The pET plasmid is used for protein expression with T7 promotor in expression strains, such as E.coli BL21(DE3) It contains a lacI gene which codes for the lac repressor protein, a protein of ...
5
votes
1answer
69 views

No digested product bands, but markers are visible. What could be the reasons?

I had to digest my insert containing plasmid and another vector into which my insert has to be ligated, each with BamHI and NotI. Upon digestion, I ran the gel to check for results. The digestion ...
3
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0answers
30 views

Cross section of actin network in neurites

for a simulation I am developing I would like to know how the actin network in neurites is distributed. Is actin confined to the periphery or is the whole neurite shaft containing actin with a rather ...
1
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0answers
65 views

Has anyone used Crispr/Cas to induce a knock-in in MEF cells?

Does anyone have experience with the crispr/cas9 platform performed on MEF? Or does anyone recall any relevent articles? Thanks
5
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1answer
131 views

High frequency human genetic oscillators?

The most well studied genetic oscillators in human genomes are involved in regulating the circadian clock (which operates on an approximately 24-hour cycle) and cell cycle activity (with single cycles ...
5
votes
2answers
54 views

What are some atypical examples of positive transcriptional cooperativity?

Cooperativity in gene expression is an important feature of many regulatory networks. Described using the Hill function, the most common example is a transcription factor (TF) that when bound to its ...
1
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1answer
165 views

RNeasy Mini Kit low 260/230 ratio — can I purify this RNA for further use?

I used Qiagen's RNeasy Mini Kit to isolate RNA from 5*10^5 C28/I2 (immortalized human chondrocytes). However, my yield is low (~25 ng/ul), but my 260/280 ratio is great (~2.3), and my 260/230 ratio is ...
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0answers
20 views

coevolution by physical interaction between RNA sequences

There are several items that relate to the concerted evolution between pairs of sencuencias (especially structural) rRNA as a consequence of physical interaction in tertiary, or even quaternary ...
1
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0answers
19 views

detection of primary origin (natural selection or genetic drift) on alterations in sequences

I recently had a question about how to distinguish the origin of variations in the sequences of rRNA as to whether alterations are generated by genetic drift or natural selection. For me it has not ...
3
votes
1answer
47 views

Efficiency of plasmid DNA isolation from frozen E. coli cell cultures

Has anyone isolated plasmid DNA from frozen (at -20degrees) E. coli cell cultures (not pellets)? Has that worked and if so, with what yields? What would be the quality of the isolated plasmid DNA if ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Assembling DNA fragments with ~10kb overlap in vitro

Let's say I have two fragments of bacterial DNA (~50kb in length each) that overlap on the ends by roughly ~10kb; the overlap sequences are unknown. I would like to assemble these into longer ...
0
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0answers
11 views

border zone of the infarcted heart

I did myocardial infarction experiments on mice and I am a newbie in this area. I need to isolate RNA and protein from the remote and the border zone. Where should I cut the heart so i can separate ...
4
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1answer
57 views
2
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1answer
27 views

Heterochromatin production limitations

Currently playing with some ideas for a project and needed some guidance. I am wondering, both in Drosophila melanogaster and in general, is the amount of heterochromatin a cell/nucleus can produce ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Kinesin-5 / cytoplasmic dynein spatial density distribution in neurons

is there some way to experimentally determine the density distribution of those two molecular motors in a Neuron? Fluorescence labeling would be impossible(?) as GFP markers would probably alter the ...
1
vote
3answers
44 views

FRET only works for interactions between 1nm to 20nm.

FRET only works for interactions between 1nm to 20nm. How can you be sure that the interaction that you want to study isn't less than 1 nm/greater than 20nm apart?
2
votes
3answers
105 views

What equipment would one use to modify a virus? [closed]

Would anyone be so kind as to give me a few examples of the equipment involved when modifying a virus? Otherwise my novel may end up reading Eva entered the lab and modified a virus. Not much back ...
3
votes
4answers
102 views

Theoretically, what technique would one use to modify a virus so that it only affected a subset of the population?

I'm writing a novel and i would like to know some of the equipment and techniques involved with modifying a virus. Is it feasible for a virus to be engineered to only affect certain people? It ...
0
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0answers
20 views

What models are used for the different pathways of apoptosis?

We are trying to find references for experimental models of different pathways of apoptosis (caspase-dependent and -independent intrinsic apoptosis, death receptor type-1 and -2 mediated apoptosis, ...
4
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1answer
229 views

Why Isolated, recombinant plasmid DNA without any restriction is often detected in agarose gel electrophoresis as three DNA bands?

I don't understand why three bands are found without any restriction digest. Please answer me as soon as possible. Thank you
1
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1answer
50 views

difference between ischemia and oxygen-glucose deprived medium

Ischemia is roughly defined as insufficient blood flow to a specific region of the body and in the literature it is generally considered as causing oxygen and glucose deprivation in the tissue and ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

Do mitochondria use ATP in order make another ATP from glucose?

Do mitochondria use ATP in order make another ATP from glucose, or does it use another source of energy to convert glucose to ATP?
1
vote
1answer
149 views

What is Pan for in pan-caspase?

A simple question (I could not find it on internet): What is Pan for in pan-caspase? Is it any different from the term 'caspase' ?
2
votes
2answers
142 views

Single stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis

From http://www.nfstc.org/pdi/Subject05/pdi_s05_m01_01.htm : ... The separation medium contains a denaturant in order that the electrophoresis is conducted on single-stranded DNA fragments. ...
6
votes
1answer
257 views

How tolerant are ants to cold?

There was a trail of what are commonly known as sugar ants (small, brown, hyperactive) in my kitchen. Three of them walked onto an ice tray placed in their path. They only walked a short distance on ...
5
votes
1answer
259 views

What is the definition of a stringent/relaxed plasmid?

I have found a publication which proposes some definitions, including a definition for strict and relaxed replication. The definitions are: Relaxed control of plasmid replication. Relaxed control ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

Are there any organisms that lack ATP synthase?

ATP synthase is used by cells to synthesise ATP from ADP using energy from a proton gradient. Depending on which sites I look at, this is either a universal feature of living cells, or it's "almost ...