The study of the molecular processes of the nucleus and cell function.

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General transcription factors vs. DNA Binding transcription factors

I know that DNA binding transcription factors are trans-acting, but what about general transcription factors? Are they cis or trans acting?
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36 views

What is the difference between basal transcription and activated transcription?

My professor keeps mentioning these two forms of transcription and I'm completely confused as to what the difference is between them. I didn't even realise there were two different types of ...
2
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1answer
242 views

How long can a human neuron live outside the body in a controlled environment?

Have there been any experiments that have kept neurons alive (stationary), without preserving methods such as freezing? If yes, then how long were the cells kept alive for?
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23 views

What is the difference between cell, membrane and animal based assay?

I am reading a review about MRP1, discussing it's ability to extrude different compounds from cell interior. When describing the different experiments conducted to observe the MRP1's reaction to ...
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1answer
47 views

Can we create custom gene/protein?

Does it possible to create any custom gene or protein we want with current technology? I have a protein sequence or a gene sequence about 4000 bp write down on my computer, is there anyway to "print" ...
2
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1answer
468 views

How to find the concentration of an enzyme?

I need to know the concentration of pectinase enzyme (sigma aldrich) which has stated 5KU, 5U/mg protein (lowry) and lot result 20U/mg protein in the label of the enzyme bottle. This is all it has ...
3
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2answers
234 views

How does Cro protein expressed by lambda phage kill its host?

I read that the DNA segment of lambda phage integrated in host DNA could switch between lysogenic state where cI represses the expression of Cro and lytic state where Cro expression takes over and ...
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0answers
33 views

Is pathlength correction vital to be included while quantifying protein

I am trying to quantify protein in serum/plasma samples. I have carried out biuret assay for my samples using microplate reader. While performing I encountered the doubt whether I should include ...
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0answers
40 views

Gene sequence and DNA [closed]

can anyone help me with this? It shows two gene sequences for a sheep and a goat. ...
5
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2answers
137 views

Non-ribosomal peptide synthesis: why Glutathione cannot be produced by the ribosome?

Case: I am writing a summary for a class in protein structure and function, and was asked to describe some different ways that peptides are synthesized (that does not involve the ribosome). I ...
2
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1answer
106 views

What is the molecular mechanism of odorant transduction signaling pathway?

I have read a few papers on the topic of odorant signaling pathway. The following papers are listed as examples. However, I found that there is not a clear pathway representation of the odorant ...
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0answers
34 views

Wash adsorbed protein without destroying Biotin-Avidin-Mechanism

I am looking for reliable protocols to wash protein (e.g. Fibronectin) adsorbed onto glass surfaces. According to Protein immobilization literature, people usually use 1% SDS and some incubation time. ...
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1answer
33 views

Conjugated deoxyribonucleotides

I'm currently learning about using PCR techniques to make fluorescently labelled DNA probes, and the textbook mentions "conjugated deoxyribonucleotides" Can someone explain what these are? Nothing ...
2
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1answer
3k views

Complementarity Determining Regions (CDRs)

Complementarity determining regions (CDRs) are part of the variable domains in immunoglobulins (antibodies) and T cell receptors, generated by B-cells and T-cells respectively, where these molecules ...
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1answer
179 views

What is the reason for having an extra recognition site for a restriction enzyme?

Can the size of a supercoiled plasmid DNA be determined by using standard DNA size fragment electrophoresed in parallel? 2. An unknown DNA molecule was cleaved using several restriction enzymes ...
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0answers
23 views

If two different diseases have more than one common pathway, the relationship between their occurences?

I just wonder that are there any special relationship between the pathway and disease occurrence. For example, there are cancer A and cancer B (and they have more than one common pathway). Then if ...
1
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1answer
29 views

Refer to Ran-GEF as a coenzyme?

Ran-GEF facilitates an exchange of GDP for GTP in the formation of Ran-GTP in the nucleus as part of gated import of proteins. Would I be correct in calling Ran-GEF or Ran-GAP coenzymes?
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1answer
63 views

On which amino-acids residue is the SDS acting on?

I would like to know exactly what is the mechanisme of the SDS, and I would like to know on which amino-acids residue the SDS is acting on. Can you help me please ? Thank you in advance !
2
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1answer
108 views

How does one insert cas9 into animal cells?

How could cas9 be inserted into cells by researchers looking to edit a genome? I imagine for engineering bacterial systems you could just put in the cas9 coding region in an expression vector, but is ...
3
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1answer
57 views

How to predict a mRNA secondary structure with a large sequence?

When I use some web servers to predict a mRNA secondary structure, I find they always required in a small size sequence. If I use a long sequence and cut it into small parts, do these small parts ...
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1answer
53 views

What is the attacking mechanism of RF on IgG?

Rheumatoid Factor (RF) attacks Fc portion of Immunoglobulin G (IgG), I want to know the underlying mechanism at molecular level. Also, what type of bond or attachment is made by RF and Fc portion of ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Producing a genetically modified animal with cell walls [closed]

I'm curious if there has been any genetic experiments transferring cell wall producing genes into the genome of a animal model organism such as the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) or a larger ...
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0answers
26 views

How do molecular recognition features work?

The occurrence of relatively short (10–70 residues), loosely structured protein regions bind within longer, largely disordered sequences that were characterized as bound to larger proteins. These ...
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0answers
37 views

Is there a better lysis buffer than this for fungal DNA extraction?

I've being using this lysis buffer for fungal DNA extraction,lysis buffer - 400mM TRis-HCl(pH8.0), 60mM EDTA(pH8.0), 150mM NaCl, 1% SDS and containing 40microgram/ml RnaseA. It is keep giving very ...
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2answers
877 views

What are the “minimum requirements” for a single cell?

I saw a description of the "minimum requirements" for a cell at http://creation.com/origin-of-life in the section called "What are the minimum requirements for a cell to live?" and I'm wondering if ...
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1answer
56 views

tandem repeat sequence; causes of contraction and/or expansion question

Question: Which of the following events, occurring within a tandem repeat sequence, will cause an expansion or contraction of the array? A) Endoduplication B) homologous recombination C) ...
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0answers
106 views

mutations induced by transposons

Question: In contrast to chemically-induced mutations, mutations induced by transposons are more likely to ... be lethal de dominant be stable revert to wild types be a gain of function The ...
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1answer
83 views

How does Cas9 interact with CRISPR?

I read that Cas9 protein along with guided RNA binds at a specific DNA fragment of foreign organism integrated in a host organism DNA. To make the host immune to virus infection Cas9 along with gRNA ...
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0answers
45 views

How are CheY, CheA, CheW, CheZ pronounced in speech?

This is a quick followup question to this question about proteins that play important roles in chemotaxis: How does one pronounce the protein names "CheY", "CheW", etc., in English? My guess would ...
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1answer
46 views

Does the new virus tree of life change their position between living and non-living things?

Viruses still do not fit the criteria of living or it's simplest form (the living cell), why would some say that the new virus tree of life makes it more closer to life? Aren't mitochondria in a point ...
2
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1answer
625 views

How to calculate or know by experiment the entropy of enzymes or protein?

How do you calculate or experimentally determine the entropy of enzymes or protein? In particular, I am interested in Boltzmann and conformational entropy, and Gibbs free energy. Any references are ...
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1answer
44 views

Resolution of gel electrophoresis

My professor mentioned the resolution of the gel in gel electrophoresis. He stated that agarose has large pores and thus low resolution whereas polyacrylamide has the opposite. I don't understand ...
3
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3answers
130 views

Abbreviations for molecules: What are CheW, CheA, CheY?

I've encountered the abbreviations such as "CheW" and "CheA" for certain organic molecules. For example: Proteins associating with the Tar complex include the autophosphorylating protein kinase ...
2
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1answer
68 views

How can E. coli affect C. elegans expression?

Plasmids can be transferred to E. coli. These transformed E. coli can be fed to C. elegans to silence its gene expression by RNAi. How can E.coli release RNAi to C. elegans? Even if we assume E. ...
3
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1answer
2k views

How does blue white screening work in selecting E coli that have taken up a plasmid vector?

The plasmid vector I am referring to is pCR 2.1 - TOPO. I added the vector to the E coli and plated them up onto LB+amp+X-gal plate, then incubated. After incubation the plates had two types of ...
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0answers
49 views

Why is there a size limit on inserts that a plasmid can accept?

Throughout my undergraduate education I have been taught that plasmids can't carry very large inserts, but I have never been told why. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
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47 views

Protein modification and ATP consumption

According to wikipedia there exists a lot of ways to modify a protein (post-translationally). Just to mention few: phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, glycosylation... While phosphorylation requires ...
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1answer
54 views

What was Protein G named after?

Protein G (the bacterial antibody binding protein) is often used to pulldown antibodies, for example in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. However, I was unable to find a site ...
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0answers
31 views

How does one predict the methylation pattern?

Suppose, we have a double stranded DNA like 5' AGCTAGGAGAGACCAGGTTCC 3' 3' TCGATCCTCTCTGGTCCAAGG 5' Where would the methylated cytosine be? Is there any randomness?
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0answers
15 views

E.coli division and its DNA replication [duplicate]

E.coli divides in 20 minutes and its DNA replicates in 38 minutes .Kindly explain.
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0answers
32 views

Is there a good easy protocol for extracting proteins(enzymes) from fungal mycelium?

I quantify the enzyme (polygalacturanase)activity by DNSA method.To determine endo-polygalacturonase activity I'm searching for a good easy enzyme extracting method.Any suggestions for a suitable ...
0
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1answer
70 views

which organelle produce glycogen phosphorylase and why

I know that Glycogen phosphorylase doesn't produce from rough endoplasmic reticulum in liver cell. But almost every proteins such as insulin receptor, serum albumin, and lysosomal enzyme have to ...
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0answers
62 views

Genetic mapping problem

A prototrophic Hfr strain of E. coli with the genotype trp+ purB- pyrC+ is conjugated with an F- strain with the genotype trp- purB+ pyrC- . The trp gene is known to enter last. The following numbers ...
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0answers
17 views

Growth of Yeast in Different pH Mediums

Will yeast grow better in acidic, basic or neutral mediums? Why? Will the medium affect the growth of yeast? (Yeast cell membrane is semi-permeable).
2
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0answers
478 views

Why does supercoiled DNA run faster?

The DNA exists in linear and cirular forms. The latter form has interesting feature called Supercoiling. The more number of writhe makes it more supercoiled because of which it gets more compact. ...
2
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3answers
863 views

Do we consume dna, proteins of other organisms?

When we eat raw meat, e.g. chicken or fish, we are actually consuming the DNA, proteins etc. which are present in their cells. Wouldn't this affect our cell functions as this DNA might enter our ...
1
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3answers
396 views

Can ampicillin resistant bacteria survive penicillin plate?

in my molecular bio class we were asked a trick question: If the bacteria has a plasmid with that grants it ampicillin ressistance, can the bacteria survive if placed in penicillin? I gave it a ...
3
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2answers
151 views

Restriction sites

I would like to know: how many restriction sites does a restriction enzyme use on a DNA molecule? In other words: If a sequence on a plasmid contains the following bases: ATTGCAGTCTG and I want ...
1
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1answer
205 views

Why does SDS-PAGE use for protein, and agarose use for nucleic acid?

My question maybe very primary, but after I learned this part, questions always follow me. SDS-PAGE gel works for detect protein, agarose gel works for detect nucleic acid, so here is my question: 1. ...
14
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4answers
11k views

Why we have no enzyme to digest cellulose?

As we know, cellulose is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature. Why don't we have any enzyme to digest cellulose?