The study of the molecular processes of the nucleus and cell function.

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1answer
847 views

Why is Sanger sequencing inferior for detecting SNPs in cancer cells?

I am familiar with Sanger sequencing, but at the level of an undergraduate. A lecturer of mine tried to describe Sanger sequencing as losing the sequence information in noise when used to detect ...
1
vote
1answer
406 views

What is solid-phase bridge amplification?

During Illumina sequencing there is a step called bridge amplification by which DNA is amplified by isothermal enzymes. What is this stage, and how does it work?
5
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2answers
5k views

What's the difference between shotgun sequencing and clone based sequencing?

What are the main differences between shotgun sequencing and clone based sequencing?
4
votes
1answer
65 views

How can I save bacillus strains on filter paper without an -80 degree freezer?

I want to save my bacillus strains but I don't have access to a -80 degree freezer. What are possible alternatives?
4
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2answers
372 views

Does bleach destroy RNAse activity, and if so, how does it do it?

I am working with RNA samples, and I'm trying to be very careful about RNAse contamination. I have some questions about bleach, though. Some people say that a solution of bleach is enough to destroy ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Is wiping with RNAse Zap enough to destroy RNAse activity?

From the RNAseZap MSDS, it is an SDS at some unknown concentration, maybe with some NaOH? Some other links suggest there is some NaOH as well. The Ambion site states that RNAseZap destroys RNAse ...
0
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1answer
82 views

How can I clean phenol extracted RNA?

I extracted RNA from skin and quantified it in an Nanodrop machine. The 260/230 ratio was very low and two peaks appeared in the absorbance curve, but the RNA is ressuspended in RNAse free water. How ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Amount of reverse transcriptase in µg or mM for qRT-PCR

I am trying to calculate a titration amount for a molecule which I would like to use in my PCR samples. Different molecules have different densities so I would like to calculate the appropriate ...
3
votes
1answer
163 views

What molecular processes are involved in pseudopodial extension?

I am curious as to the processes and mechanisms involved in the extension of pseudopodia in amoeba. How does the cell know and control the direction and extent of pseudopodia formation at a molecular ...
2
votes
1answer
512 views

Manipulation of gene expression using VP16 fusion and engrailed fusion to a transcription factor?

Today, a presenter briefly mentioned that gene expression in sea urchins during development might be manipulated using VP16 and engrailed fusions. On a slide, it said that expression might be ...
4
votes
1answer
215 views

Can I heat Trizol?

I wonder if I can heat Trizol reagent for 30 min 65C. The goal is to disrupt protein-RNA complex while inhibiting nucleases. (I can't use RNasin cause it's inactivated in 65C, and can't use RVC cause ...
1
vote
1answer
357 views

Why does the hydrolysis of ATP increasing entropy increase the Phosphoryl-­‐transfer Potential?

I am currently taking a biology class. I do not understand this concept. I understand that the electrostatic repulsion of the negative charges, resonance stabilization and hydration stabilization all ...
3
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1answer
106 views

205 nm UV-Vis readings

Typically we determine the concentration of proteins using a 280 nm reading. However, it is reasonable to use 205 nm. I was curious about the effectiveness of this method.
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0answers
49 views

Experience with Detox Cloning [closed]

I just saw this paper. A Highly Efficient Molecular Cloning Platform that Utilises a Small Bacterial Toxin Gene I was curious if anyone had experience with this cloning strategy using the IbsC ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Improving Gel Extraction yields

How can I improve my Gel Extraction yields. We use the standard protocol from Qiagen, gel extraction, dissolve in QG buffer at 42C and purify via anion exchange columns. However, with 500 ng we ...
3
votes
0answers
85 views

How does LCR compare to Assembly PCR

The question pretty much explains itself. How do the two methods compare? I've always used Assembly PCR but the method is prone to mistakes and I'm curious how it compares to Ligase Chain Reaction ...
4
votes
1answer
200 views

What is a simple protocol for staining cells in suspension?

I am an engineering student studying how electric fields affect cells, specifically the phenomena of electroporation in living cells. I know that electroporation is widely used for introducing genes ...
1
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1answer
87 views

What in soy are people allergic to and will these allergens be passed along if an animal that has eaten soy is consumed?

I have two related questions about soy allergies and possible reactions. What is it that are humans who have soy allergies actually allergic to? What is the allergen? If an animal eats soy, are ...
8
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2answers
6k views

Agarose vs agar? Why do DNA gels use agarose only and how do you obtain agarose from agar?

Agar is a relatively cheap substance from red algae. And it contains a saccharide agarose as well as a small amount of pectin. Agar is used for culture plates as is, but for DNA gels a grade of ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Can I use PCR buffer instead of cDNA synthesis buffer?

I am using Fermentase First strand cDNA synthesis kit but its buffer is over. I need to work today but I have not access to any sorce currently. I have PCR buffer in the lab. Can I use PCR buffer ...
6
votes
2answers
201 views

Can forensic DNA analysis be used to generate a visual approximation of a suspect?

In light of the current US supreme court case, I'm curious if enough information can be teased out of a DNA sample to get a "reasonable" approximation of the suspect (never mind the legality). I ...
3
votes
1answer
465 views

Why re-label the strand ends in 3' DNA labelling?

I have a problem with a molecular biology question; I don’t understand how DNA 3’ labelling works. I took a diagram from my lesson and tried to understand with it; this is what I understood. If I’m ...
3
votes
1answer
610 views

Difference between “transcriptional activity” and “RNA expression”

I am working with a network object where the nodes are different events in molecular biology. Specifically; Catalytic activity of X, RNA expression of X, GTP-bound activity of X, Kinase activity of ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Very high 260/230 absorbance ratio of an RNA sample

After my most recent RNA extraction, the RNA samples had very high 260/230 absorbance ratios, (ranging from 5 to 25). I've never gotten numbers like this and I know the ratio is supposed to be ~2 in ...
6
votes
1answer
434 views

How does Topoisomerase II inhibition affect cancer cells?

Topoisomerase II poisons represent some of the most important and widely prescribed anticancer drugs currently in clinical use. These drugs encompass a diverse group of natural and synthetic ...
1
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1answer
862 views

Molecular cause of cramps, spasms and strengthening in muscles? (incl. intro to muscle contraction)

When motor neurons are stimulated to trigger an action potential, this potential propagates down the spine, eventually reaching a neuromuscular junction, causing the release of acetylcholine (ACh). ...
4
votes
2answers
231 views

Question about equilibrium potential formula

My biology book says, that the equilibrium potential for an ion with a charge of +1 is: $$E_{ion}= 62mV \biggl(\log\frac{[ion]_{outside}}{[ion]_{inside}}\biggr)$$ Where does the 62 mV come from? How ...
9
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2answers
6k views

What is the difference between SOLiD, 454, and Illumina next-gen sequencing?

I've started teaching myself about next-generation sequencing in preparation for a new job, and I'm wondering what the main differences are between the 454, SOLiD, and Illumina/Solexa machines, in ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

How does formaldehyde cause protein-DNA crosslinking?

How does formaldehyde cause protein-DNA crosslinking? I would guess it's because the strongly polar water molecule interacts strongly with polar residues on a protein-DNA complex, and adding a less ...
3
votes
2answers
73 views

How common is bacterial mediated transformation? In plants? In animal cells?

The most common method to transform plants is by soaking plant tissue in cultures of agrobacteria (this is not their current classification) which transfer DNA into the plants. Is lateral gene ...
4
votes
1answer
272 views

Why am I getting low transformation efficiency with DB3.1 E.coli cells?

I am making competent cells using DB3.1 E. coli cells. Even after following the exact protocol (Inoue method for ultracompetent cells) given in 'Sambrook and Russel', I am not getting transformation ...
5
votes
1answer
125 views

What is the extent of the effect of Tris on E. coli?

I was a fool and dissolved my antibiotic (Kanamycin) into Tris Buffer rather than H₂O. The Kanamycin still seems to be active but a fellow labmate mentioned that Tris messes around with the membrane ...
6
votes
1answer
245 views

Why does not the host produce any immune response to antiserum antibodies?

When an antiserum is injected to a person to protect oneself from a certain disease, the antibodies in the antiserum come from another organism. The question is: Why don't the injected antibodies ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Solid phase use in HIV rapid tests [closed]

I have a question in regards to my HIV test research. The rapid tests like Orasures Oraquick contains a strip of synthetic peptides that are used to represent proteins found in the envelope region of ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

Can Taq polymerase be used instead of polymerase Vent exo (-)?

Instead of using polymerase Vent exo (-), can I go with the usual Taq polymerase? Do the PCR conditions change (the temperature and master mix concentrations ) in the these two conditions? Do the ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

High protein turnover rate and protease inhibitors?

I work with mice, and I want to see what happens to some specific proteins in the mouse brain after IL-1b injection (intracerebroventricular). I have a problem: when I measure the mRNA and protein ...
6
votes
2answers
19k views

What is the function of the RNA primer in DNA replication?

During DNA replication, RNA primase puts an RNA primer in the lagging strand. What is the function of this RNA primer? Why can't the enzymes put DNA fragments directly?
7
votes
2answers
972 views

Bacterial cell lysis - what solution to use?

I am trying to determine how quickly detergents act on bacterial cells (cell lysis). I would like to compare some detergents at difference concentrations for bacteriolytic activity. I don’t care about ...
10
votes
1answer
105 views

When running a gel, what could cause a standard to run “faster” than usual?

We are running a gel on the products of a restriction digest to determine the size of an insert. We know the vector backbone size should be ~2.9kb; however, the standard appears to be running too ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

What are the advantages and disadvantages of using beta-galactosidase compared to luciferase as a reporter gene?

In the University labs, we have used Beta-galactosidase as a reporter gene to quantify the expression initiated by the stress-response promoter in yeast. This was done by exposing one of the two ...
2
votes
1answer
126 views

Histone marks mechanism

I am slightly confused about the mechanisms that makes histone modifications associate with gene expression. That is, H3K36me3 is believed to be present in actively transcribed genes, H3K27me3 in ...
6
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2answers
109 views

DAM enzyme distances move along the genome

I am fusing a protein with a Dam enzyme (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dam_(methylase)). The idea is that when the protein binds to the DNA, the Dam enzyme will start methylating nearby GATC sites, ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

High Glucose vs Low Glucose DMEM for Cell Culture

I've noticed that in mammalian cell culture, there are often two types of DMEM available. High Glucose and Low Glucose. Does it matter which type I use for culturing of cells (e.g. Hela or HEK293)? ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

DNA as an acid? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does DNA react in all of the ways most other acids do? Even if DNA is made up of nucleotide bases, it is said to be an acid. Why is this?
3
votes
2answers
207 views

Do Yeast Insertion constructs revert?

If I insert a new gene with a yeast integrating plasmid and select with a drop out culture once, can I assume that the newly integrated gene will stay in the strain without putting selective pressure ...
7
votes
1answer
46 views

circulating microRNAs are functional?

In plasma and other body fluids, miRNAs can be found. They not only originate from dying cells but also from active secretion and are usually 'packed' into vesicles/lipo-proteic structures (i.e. ...
8
votes
2answers
190 views

How are antibodies designed?

Antibodies have the ability of recognising highly specific peptide sequences and bind it at their antigen-binding site. This ability is harnessed as a tool in research to purify target structures in ...
2
votes
3answers
82 views

Is DNA mutation locally energetically stabilizing the DNA molecule

I am no biologist, but as a physicist, a spontaneous mutation (seen as a chemical transformation) should lower the energy of the system, at least locally. So I wonder if any research has been done ...
8
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2answers
302 views

Do antibiotics attenuate immune response on subsequent exposure to same bacteria?

A healthy immune response to a bacterial infection includes "memory" to permit the body to thwart subsequent exposure to same bacteria. What are the dynamics of using antibiotics on initial exposure ...
12
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1answer
860 views

What did Richard Feynman contribute to molecular biology?

Some time ago, I read James Gleick's "Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman", a wonderful biography of Feynman and, by extension, most of modern physics. In this book, the author mentions ...