The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

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Standard DNA extraction protocol [on hold]

Which DNA extraction protocol in plant and other biological complex is acceptable method for article?
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What is the most reliable tumour suppressing gene for NSCLC?

I was looking at some tumour suppressing genes that can be helpful in diagnosing lung cancer (particularly NSCLC - Non-small-cell lung carcinoma) at an early stage. I came across a few such as p53, ...
2
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1answer
34 views

Can we knock out Caspase-9 *and* avoid breast cancer phenotype in our mouse model?

I am trying to design a wet lab experiment with no wet lab experience to name. Right now, in my dream land, it would be excellent if it were possible to create a Caspase-9 knockout mouse (damage to ...
2
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29 views

Do The Traces Genetic Diseases Remain in families?

I know that there are certain diseases that are predominant on genes. But, is there any sort of surety that if parents are suffering from a disorder then their offspring has to suffer from the same. ...
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42 views

Why is 5S-rRNA is different from other rRNAs in place of transcription and usage of RNA polymerase?

While transcription of rRNAs happens in nucleolus mediated by RNA Polymerase-I, we see that 5S-rRNA is transcribed elsewhere by RNA Polymerase-III. What is the cause and why?
2
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1answer
48 views

Markers for human genetic mapping

For human genetic mapping several different types of markers are used: RFLPs (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms) VNTRs (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) such as mini- and microsatellites ...
3
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1answer
33 views

What is the statistical relationship between radioactivity and mutation rate?

This question tries to narrow down the scope of that question. What is the statistical relationship between radioactivity and mutation rate? By how much would the mutation rate be lowered in a ...
4
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1answer
40 views

Do nucleosomes ever completely unwrap during transcription?

In eukaryotic transcription will the nucleosomes ever completely unwind the DNA and the histone complex disassemble? If an operon is more 160 base pairs it seems it must.
2
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18 views

Which is the guideline to choose a molecular target to identify vertebrate hosts from arthropod bloodmeals?

There are some molecular targets to identify vertebrate hosts from arthropod bloodmeals including the Cyt b gene and the COI gene. Which are the standards or characteristics that I have to bear in ...
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168 views

Splice in with CRISPR/Cas

I need to splice a gene into a human cell genome, with highest rate possible. I mean, doesn't really matter where the gene enters, nor does it matter if some cells die as a result of this. CRISPR ...
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36 views

Primer Designing [closed]

I have a basic idea about the requirements in primer designing. Basically my knowledge is limited to theoretical knowledge and have no experience in actual primer designing. And also I have a basic ...
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25 views

Should gene therapy safety protocol include isolation?

In the case of a gene therapy trial where viral vectors are used to deliver genes into mammalian cells, including humans, should biosafety and ethical protocols include isolation of the patient as a ...
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47 views

Can molecular genetics make a boolean variable from a continuous variable?

In the same kind of idea than this question. Gene expression are regulated through complex interactions. The concentration of enhancers and repressors is an important aspect that dictate the level of ...
2
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37 views

CRISPR Knock in

Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, it is possible that after inducing a DSB with the Cas9 endonuclease guided with an RNA designed by the user and using a template DNA, get a desired Knock-In (KI) by ...
7
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1answer
63 views

Do DNA repressors exist?

I know about enhancers and the mechanism that lead them to increase the gene expression of their targets but I was wondering if similarly DNA repressors exist. I know about protein repressors but I am ...
6
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1answer
67 views

“Enhancers” of enhancers?

I am looking for examples (if any) of genomic regions which regulates the activity of enhancers, either augmenting or reducing it. Essentially some kind of enhancers (or repressors) of enhancers to ...
1
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1answer
21 views

How to correlate the pattern by which CAP activator from E.coli binds to DNA and its mechanism of action?

The catabolite activator protein (CAP) activates the expression of more than 100 genes involved in secondary sugar metabolism in E.coli. Apparently, it always binds in sites that are away from -10 and ...
9
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1answer
93 views

RNA migrating slower than DNA on Formaldehyde Gel?

So I ran into an interesting problem. I'm getting a linear DNA band that is twice as long (4x bases, but as denatured probably only 2x) as an RNA band running at the same size in a formaldehyde gel. ...
5
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1answer
102 views

Can human mRNA be translated in vitro by prokaryotes?

As the genetic code is universal, can mRNA from a human cell be correctly translated by a prokaryote in a in vitro translation system?
2
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1answer
53 views

How does alternative splicing work?

I am trying to find out what controls what exons are spliced out, and I keep coming across the term cis regulator, but I cannot seem to find a clear explanation of what happens... Thank you in ...
0
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1answer
58 views

What are microRNA, siRNA and antisense RNA?

From what I understand, microRNA binds to proteins which can cut certain mRNA strands do that this protein is not synthesised. This seems like gene silencing to me, however I have also come across the ...
6
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1answer
62 views

Why do some bacteria have most genes on the leading strand of the genome?

Genes in the (+) strand are black and genes in the (-)strand are red. The gene distribution in E. coli genome is somewhat expected: transcribed regions would tend to alternate with non transcribed ...
4
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2answers
114 views

How does optogenetics work?

I am aware of the post here 'Optogenetics - How do microbial opsins work?' however it is a bit too technical for me. I am struggling to understand how the neurons can be genetically engineered to ...
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0answers
20 views

Stable transfection

I need to achieve stable transfection of a pCI-Neo plasmid into the genome of a mouse embryo. The most common way to achieve stable transfection is through positive selection, however positive ...
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2answers
52 views

Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
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35 views

Layman definition of genetic polymorphism?

I am reading an article about Genetic Polymorphism and there are lines in the article about genetic polymophism that I don't quite understand like. In this area,there are six different chemotypes ...
3
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1answer
59 views

meaning of the “reads” keyword in terms of RNA-seq or next generation sequencing

I'm an undergraduate student at computer science and currently, I'm interested in bioinformatics. Today, I've started to read a paper about clustering and classification of non-coding RNAs can be ...
3
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1answer
21 views

Telomere and its effect on aging

The cloned sheep, Dolly, was said to have died very soon because the cells used to create it were taken from an adult sheep with an aged telomere. Why doesn't this happen with humans? Why aren't we ...
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2answers
61 views

How does the size of insert affects the rate of Homologous Recombination in yeast?

When performing genetic knockouts in yeast using homologous recombination to replace a target gene sequence via a vector DNA, does the region between the flanking regions in the vector have to be the ...
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0answers
36 views

If you are God, how would you create an efficient priming reaction? [closed]

Imagine that you are “natural selection” (or God if you prefer) and you can reconstitute replication changing the concentrations or the properties (higher/lower activity; reactivity; etc.) of the ...
2
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1answer
407 views

Can DNA & RNA be considered as nature's programming language?

The final frontier of Biological Sciences could be considered understanding the effects of variation in the DNA (and RNA). If after fertilization the DNA of the zygote could be genetically ...
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18 views

How to engineer chromosomal duplications?

Specific genetic engineering of chromosomal aberrations like deletions, inversions and translocations are doable by using the CRISPR/Cas system or the other programmable nuclease systems. Insertions ...
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22 views

What is the most complex biological organism (or precursors) that we have been able to synthesize from raw materials?

In the Miller–Urey experiment they produced several amino acids. I'm not sure if there were other similar experiments that got further. ...
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1answer
31 views

Mode of Enzymatic Inhibition via R-Allele

The photo above shows the effects of the R allele of the pea shape gene on the synthesis of an enzyme that converts unbranched starch into branched starch. The r allele of this gene determines an ...
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3answers
2k views

Does a man contain all the genes needed to make a woman?

This question is brought on by a Sci Fi novel I am thinking about writing. The plot device involves a colonist in charge of building a population on a new planet who loses his supply of embryos and so ...
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27 views

What log transformation and normalization functions are most commonly used for microarray and how to select them?

Need help on rational approach to choosing log transformation, standartization and normalization functions in microarray experiments. I am using Expander software and it provides Log2 transform and ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Can cfDNA testing distinguish results in the case of twins?

A fetus can now be screened for some of the more common genetic diseases and its sex determined from just a whole blood sample from the pregnant mother. Fetal DNA is abundant enough in the systemic ...
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2answers
123 views

Growing E. coli at room temperature?

If I were to do a blue/white selection of transformed E. coli on LB agar ampicillin plates at room temperature (23⁰C) for about 2 days and 18 hours, will I run into the issue of satellite colonies or ...
4
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3answers
311 views

Why is mRNA needed in the Protein translation?

The original question was to predict the basic requirements for information storage. Then the discussion moved to why is it necessary to include mRNA in the protein translation process. Why can't ...
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18 views

What genetic distance model should be used when calculating genetic differences in Arelquin?

I'm using Arelquin to look at the genetic structure between a number of different populations. I want to compare the populations by producing pairwise FST values, however I don't know what model for ...
2
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1answer
39 views

G>T transversion VS. T>G transversion?

So I'm reading about how mutations in DNA can be caused by oxidative damage. An example of a product of oxidative damage is given: 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine My textbook says that this product ...
2
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1answer
28 views

What initiates primase to add an RNA primer to a DNA strand and what makes it stop?

What initiates primase to add an RNA primer to a DNA strand and what makes it stop adding RNA nucleotides? Is there tags added to the DNA back-bone?
3
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1answer
75 views

Problem on number of amino acids that an alien can use

A new life form discovered on a distant planet has a genetic code consisting of five unique nucleotides and only one stop codon. If each codon has four bases,what is the maximum number of unique amino ...
2
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2answers
175 views

Viral Mutation Mechanism

I think I have a wrong concept about viral mutation process. First of all what is mutation actually? I mean, I know it's a sudden change in DNA, happening when subjected to mutagenic agents. But can ...
2
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1answer
63 views

PCR processes number of amplicons produced [closed]

Beginning with 600 template DNA molecules after 25 cycles of PCR how many amplicons will be produced?
1
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1answer
51 views

RNAs arising from intergenic regions

Which type of RNA molecule is coded for in intergenic regions? I think it must be a non-coding RNA but I'm unsure which type.
0
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1answer
261 views

Calculating number of amino acids in mRNA

Assuming there were 20 different amino acids and less than 40 types of different tRNAs found in this alien organism. How many amino acids would be found in the translational product of a ...
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51 views

Loss in DNA band size extracted from polyacrylamide gel

I'm using cDNA AFLP teq.. I extracted 670 bp band from polyacrylamide (urea) gel and I have amplified with PCR but on agarose gel it stops at nearly 350 bp.it happened for most of other bands before. ...
1
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1answer
21 views

Centriole genes Knock-out Experiment in Common experimental animals?

Anyone know of any experiments that have knocked out the genes for producing centrioles in a worm, mouse, fish, fly or whatever animal? Are the genes for centrioles even identified? It has been shown ...
5
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2answers
593 views

Why is the DNA codon table “equal” to the RNA codon table

Before anything else please pay attention of the double quotes on the "equal" in the title - I know they are not equal, but you will understand in a bit. If I look at the DNA codon table here or in ...