The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

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Assembling DNA fragments with ~10kb overlap in vitro

Let's say I have two fragments of bacterial DNA (~50kb in length each) that overlap on the ends by roughly ~10kb; the overlap sequences are unknown. I would like to assemble these into longer ...
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24 views

Heterochromatin production limitations

Currently playing with some ideas for a project and needed some guidance. I am wondering, both in Drosophila melanogaster and in general, is the amount of heterochromatin a cell/nucleus can produce ...
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Heterochromatin binding sites position information

I am working on a project and I'm trying to find data on the position of genes and heterochromatin binding sites such as HP1 in Drosophila melanogaster. Is this information available for the DGRP ...
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66 views

what is the difference between “cistron” and “gene”

I'm asking after reading the cognate wikipedia.en article on "cistron". I still am not sure about the difference of the two terms. To me it seems valid to picture a "cistron" as the genome wide set ...
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98 views

Restriction endonucleases are found in?

Quoting from : Scientific American July 1975 The Manipulation of genes by Stanley Cohen : Restriction endonucleases (and modification methylases) are widespread in microorganisms; genes for ...
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39 views

Various Genetic Loads and their Definitions

In population genetics, we talk about several types of genetic loads (also called just loads). I am asking for a exhaustive list and a short definition. Here are for example some genetic loads that ...
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47 views

What is the close and related genome used for in Gene models?

all I am a little bit confused about using the related genome or reference genome. When we have a reference genome, we can do alignment. Also we can do the assembly. Can you give some more reason ...
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73 views

Detecting food fraud

There's undoubtedly more than one way to do this, but if a DIY biologist were to attempt to detect food fraud (e.g. as done by students from Stanford University and Trinity School, Manhattan with ...
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29 views

Study case of the inheritance system of Oenothera

I've been told some interesting facts about oenothera. Apparently in this species some lineages have been through some translocations and in results to these translocations and in consequence, some ...
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35 views

Inbreeding depression and dominance

From this article, second paragraph of the second page A classic theoretical result is that the mean of a character controlled by a single locus $i$ with two alleles $A_{i1}$ and $A_{i2}$ is only ...
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52 views

Coefficient of relationship and path of coefficient

A path of coefficient of relationship is defined as $$\rho_{AO} = \left( \frac{1}{2}\right)^n \sqrt { \frac{1+f_A}{1+f_O}}$$ This SE post discusses this definition From this, the coefficient of ...
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22 views

Inbreeding Coefficient and Coefficient of Relationship

Wikipedia gives the following formula to calculate a "path of coefficient of relationship" between an ancestor $A$ and an offspring $O$: $$\rho_{AO} = 2^{-n} \left( \frac{1+f_A}{1+f_O} \right)^{1/2} ...
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Why does the stability of YAC increase with size?

From Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry : The stability of YAC increases with size (up to a limit). Those with inserts of less than 100000 are gradually lost during mitosis. Why does this ...
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Book Recommendation: Complex Traits and Complex Genetic Architecture

I am looking for a book (or any good source of information) that offers an in-depth discussion and models about the evolution and analysis of complex traits and complex genetic architecture. Do you ...
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65 views

What is the current molecular explanation of Mendel's pea cross?

With reference to the simplest Punnet square for Mendel's pea plant experiments it occurred to me that I could not connect the little I know about genetics to the little I know about molecules. The ...
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57 views

Studying genetics [closed]

I am interested in studying disorders that are genetic in origin. However, I am having difficulty in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding processes such as meiosis, mitosis, and ...
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Do cell walls prevent cancer?

To my knowledge plants do not have an uncontrolled growth disease similar to cancer. Is the function by which they avoid uncontrolled growth related to their cell wall and preventing damage to ...
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68 views

How does GC-content evolve?

Background GC-content refers to the frequency of base pairs that are either C or G in the genome, or in other words the number of GC base pairs divided by the addition of the number of GC base pairs ...
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24 views

Property of E.coli harboring F element

From Genetics by Ursula Goodenough E.coli harboring an F element are endowed with a number of phenotypic traits : 1.They are sensitive to infection by ssRNA phages and certain ssDNA phages. ...
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34 views

Cloning a gene of an organism with an nonsequenced genome

What would be the best protocol to clone a gene about 5kb in size? The genome is not sequenced, but the gene itself very similar to orthologous genes of organisms with known sequences.
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54 views

Understanding DNA supercoiling

While trying to understand DNA supercoiling, I came across these lines in the book Genetics by Ursula Goodenough : All natural DNA is superhelical. The axis of the duplex itself follows a ...
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Is it reasonable to assume that RNA polymerase would bind preferentially to the promoter of the long allele of the SERT gene?

I'm trying to come up with an idea for a school project (a hypothetical research study). I'm looking at depression and the serotonin transporter gene, which is highly expressed in the human ...
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28 views

Transport of mammalian insulin in vivo

What is the mechanism for transport of insulin in mammalian cells?
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32 views

Paracentric Inversion and Mutations Question Help Needed

Would someone please be able to help with questons 3 or 4. (one of the at least please) please don't report his as off-topic. first, this is NOT a homeowork question. It's a practice question I am ...
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101 views

Sexual Differentiation in Monoecious plants with unisexual flowers

In monoecious plants having unisexual flowers (eg Zea Mays, Ricinus Communis etc), there must be some mechanism as to produce two sexually distinct flowers from the same genotype. Since both the type ...
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103 views

How is a stem-cell induced to assimilate a knock-in DNA construct?

While looking at (daylight) color perception I came across a paper by Jeremy Nathans (et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., vol. 100 no. 20, 2003, full text here) in which he describes the creation of a ...
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Southern/Western blot analysis and pedigree diagram? Help needed. [duplicate]

Hello everyone. I urgently need help with this question please. I have filled in the blanks using the results in the figure provided in the sheet. However, for number (b) is a little hard to ...
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36 views

Gene Complementation Question

Hi everyone! Here is a diagram of a genetics complementation problem. My main concern is regarding number 3d. I'm assuming that in this case, it would be complementary interaction and thus ...
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74 views

Pedigree Diagram help

I am asked to fill the genotypes in the spaces provided but looks like I am aving a little bit of trouble. can anyone help? thanks in advance!
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84 views

PedigreeAnalysis Genetics [duplicate]

Hello! I need help with this exercise question. I am not really sure which pedigree diagram is autosomal and which is not. But, is question b 1/2. Can someone give an explanation? Thanks very much ...
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37 views

What is “transcribed strand”

This is an excerpt from a paper: T>C mutations at NpTpN trinucleotides, also found in hepatocellular carcinomas, shows strong transcriptional strand bias with more T>C mutations on the transcribed ...
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44 views

Process of Transcription

During the process of Conversion to Ribonucleoside Monophosphates the various ribonucleoside triphosphates break off their high energy bonds after linkage to the DNA.But the first ribonucleotide ...
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78 views

Activation Of Embryonic Genome

Embryonic gene activation is a process by which the embryo begins to transcribe its newly formed genome.As the embryonic gene activation occurs during early stages the paternal genome may not have any ...
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Embryo activity during seed dormancy?

What metabolic processes does a dormant embryo in a seed carry out? The newly produced seed will not germinate, either because of a lack of favourable conditions, seed hibernation, or because of a ...
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78 views

Ethidium bromide and mutagenesis on cloning

When performing a DNA cloning, sometimes PCR amplicon is run in agarose and it is detected by ethidium bromide marking under UV light. After that, gel is sliced, DNA extracted from gel....... until ...
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Which restriction enzyme would i use?

Plasmid pBr322 includes two genes that confer antibiotic resistance: a gene for ampicillin and a gene for tetracycline. The cutting site for the restriction enzyme BamH1 is in the middle pf the ...
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What are some examples of genes that code for multiple proteins?

The title pretty much says it all. It is widely taught that a gene in a eukaryotic system could produce more than one protein due to post-transcriptional modification, but I do not believe I have come ...
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36 views

Regulation of the replication of mtDNA at embryonic level

While reading an article on mitochondrial inheritance I came across this link. The results state that mitochondrial DNA replication is regulated in different cells of an embryo at different levels. ...
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70 views

DNA and gene activation

As far as the genetic content of each cell is concerned I have read to my satisfaction that all cells of a person's body except the red blood cells (with no nucleus and so no genetic message) and the ...
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Transduction with P1 lysate prepared from strain that is proC::Tn10

If I do a transduction with a P1 lysate prepared from a strain that is pro*C*::Tn10 and the recipient is wild type, will all my recombinants be ProC- and Tet resistant since the Tn10 is in the proC ...
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62 views

How does promoter sequence affect initiation?

I don't know if this might have been highlighted in recent research, but a textbook I have states that "the exact way in which promoter sequence affects [transcription] initiation is unclear" I'm ...
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355 views

Telomere shortening during replication

It is widely know that each cell cycle during DNA replication some fraction of the telomeres is lost, and this phenomenon is called the end replication problem. Well this is due to the fact that the ...
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940 views

Difference between CDS and cDNA

What is the difference between Coding Sequences (CDS) and cDNA? Are Coding sequences the sequences that is transcribed to mRNA and cDNA in contrast DNA obtained by reverse polymerization of matured ...
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75 views

Transposons and the net amount of DNA

The retrotransposons and certain DNA-transposons, are "jumping" sequences which may be incorporated elsewhere in the genomic DNA of an organism, through varying mechanisms. This insertion is almost ...
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93 views

Should the length of the electrodes in the electrophoresis chamber be proportional to chamber's size?

I am trying to build a small horizontal electrophoresis chamber from scratch. I want to use it for comet assay and I will be using only 1 slide, so it's going to be about 3cm wide, 10cm long and 4cm ...
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48 views

Criteria for the numbering of human chromosomes

What were the criteria devised for the numbering convention employed in human chromosomes? When was it fixed? Correct me if I am wrong; it appears that chromosome pairs 1 to 22 were originally ...
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494 views

Lyonization and X-linked disorders?

Lyonization or X-chromosome inactivation is the conversion of all but one, X-chromosomes in Females into non-coding heterochromatin (i.e. deactivated) leading to the formation of one or more Barr ...
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798 views

Difference between mutation and DNA damage

What is the strict difference between mutation and DNA damage? As far as I understand it, a mutation is an alteration in the genetic sequence, having "tricked" the repairing machinery and thus ...
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104 views

Can you detect if a mutation is spontaneous or induced?

Is it possible to determine if a certain specific mutation had a spontaneous origin (for example from a mistake of the DNA polymerase) as opposed to an induced origin (for example, from some genotoxic ...
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148 views

what is knob heterochromatin?

I am reading a paper which discusses Maize Genome Structure. Descriptions of the structure is given in the papers introduction. I know about heterochromatin "heterochromatin stains intensely, ...