The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

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Lac operon: How can lactose enter the cell in the absence of lactose permease?

My textbook states that lactose permease...transports lactose into the cell and When lactose is added to the growth medium, the lactose molecules bind to the other site on the repressor ...
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2k views

What is the distinction between F' plasmid and R plasmid?

Is there a difference between an F' plasmid that has taken up a chromosomal gene that conveys antibiotic resistance, and an R plasmid? Is a bacterium containing an R plasmid and yet lacking an F+ ...
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619 views

How does optogenetics work?

I am aware of the post here 'Optogenetics - How do microbial opsins work?' however it is a bit too technical for me. I am struggling to understand how the neurons can be genetically engineered to ...
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72 views

Can difference in the expression potential of alleles lead to dominance?

Several hour ago I was in thoughts what allele dominance really means on molecular level. As we know from basic genetics, if the organism had Aa type of some gene ...
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92 views

Why are fifth order Markov Models, the ones most often used for gene prediction?

As far as we know that smallest polypeptide chain length is 60 amino acids - so if we found an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of about 60 codons without the interruption of stop codon we can consider it to ...
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143 views

Can human mRNA be translated in vitro by prokaryotes?

As the genetic code is universal, can mRNA from a human cell be correctly translated by a prokaryote in a in vitro translation system?
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516 views

Is there a practical upper limit to amount of nucleotides or genes in a transformed plasmid?

I'm currently working on a synthetic biology project which involves working with lots of different parts. I would ultimately like to integrate these genes by transforming a single plasmid. I've heard ...
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234 views

How are DNA polymerase error rates measured?

It is well known that the first DNA polymerase, Taq, is quite error prone. Newer generation commercial enzymes that have either been isolated from different thermophile species or have been improved ...
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84 views

How many genes does D. melanogaster have?

Obviously there is no 100% exact number, but I came across this on flybase, the gold standard for annotation. I am confused now. "Genes located to the genome", is that what I am looking for? If so, ...
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60 views

Is there are practical lower limit to gene length in E. coli?

Question is rather self-explanatory. Putting aside other post-transcriptional factors like rate of degradation of transcript, what is the smallest gene ever reported to have successfully been ...
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29 views

Constant or variable number of chiasmata during recombination?

During recombination, is the number of chiasmata consistent for each gamete and are the chiasmata regions consistent within a single organism?
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81 views

Why is 5S-rRNA is different from other rRNAs in place of transcription and usage of RNA polymerase?

While transcription of rRNAs happens in nucleolus mediated by RNA Polymerase-I, we see that 5S-rRNA is transcribed elsewhere by RNA Polymerase-III. What is the cause and why?
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96 views

Examples of genes involved in plastic responses

Adaptive plasticity involves sensing the environment and responding adaptively to it. Intuitively, I would think that this process may ask for a more or less complex genetic machinery of regulation of ...
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80 views

Do transcripts always start and end with exons?

I realized that in all cases of "RefSeq Genes" annotations of hg19 I looked at spliced transcripts start (and end) with an exon. From the annotation there is no evidence of any sequence upstream or ...
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2k views

Why is mRNA needed in the Protein translation?

The original question was to predict the basic requirements for information storage. Then the discussion moved to why is it necessary to include mRNA in the protein translation process. Why can't ...
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386 views

Ethidium bromide and mutagenesis on cloning

When performing a DNA cloning, sometimes PCR amplicon is run in agarose and it is detected by ethidium bromide marking under UV light. After that, gel is sliced, DNA extracted from gel....... until ...
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133 views

Detecting food fraud

There's undoubtedly more than one way to do this, but if a DIY biologist were to attempt to detect food fraud (e.g. as done by students from Stanford University and Trinity School, Manhattan with ...
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9k views

Difference between CDS and cDNA

What is the difference between Coding Sequences (CDS) and cDNA? Are Coding sequences the sequences that is transcribed to mRNA and cDNA in contrast DNA obtained by reverse polymerization of matured ...
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34 views

How much time do the different mechanisms of gene regulation need to take effect?

I am thinking of the major regulatory mechanisms, like general transcription factors, activators, repressors, and RNA interference. If non-active regulator genes using each of the different ...
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346 views

How many copies of a gene?

I am studying mathematical models of transcription and translation and I am wondering: In a particular genome, how many copies of a gene coding for one particular protein should one expect? Are they ...
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120 views

Do nucleosomes ever completely unwrap during transcription?

In eukaryotic transcription will the nucleosomes ever completely unwind the DNA and the histone complex disassemble? If an operon is more 160 base pairs it seems it must.
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68 views

Are there known downsides to removing UV mutation hotspots to prevent some skin cancers (Genetic sunblock)?

Khavari et al. recently demonstrated that a significant fraction of one of the major forms of skin cancer (cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas) are associated with a mutated KNSTRN gene (a protein ...
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64 views

How to read this DNA inversion diagram?

In the following diagram about chromosome inversion, I don't understand: Why do we need to take the reverse complement from step 1 to 2? Isn't inversion just reversing the bases in the region? How ...
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65 views

What is positive and negative supercoiling?

Is the following correct? Positive supercoiling = the coiling of DNA helix (B-DNA) on itself during intesified coiling of the two DNA stands in right handed direction negative supercoiling = the ...
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68 views

How long is saliva viable?

Does anyone know if saliva can stay viable for about 5 days, before it gets suspended into a DNA genealogy vial for testing? Background: My brother wants to do a DNA genealogy test at a US testing ...
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42 views

What is the statistical relationship between radioactivity and mutation rate?

This question tries to narrow down the scope of that question. What is the statistical relationship between radioactivity and mutation rate? By how much would the mutation rate be lowered in a ...
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90 views

Influence of temperature on transcription, protein binding and decay rates

I am the kind of biologist who doesn't know much about molecular genetics and about the dynamic of biochemical reactions. Question My question concerns the influence of temperature on the dynamic of ...
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559 views

Genetic linkage greater than 50 centimorgans

Classically, the linkage between two loci can be measured in centimorgans (cM), which represents the percent chance that these two loci will recombine an odd number of times (generating a recombinant ...
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405 views

Sexual Differentiation in Monoecious plants with unisexual flowers

In monoecious plants having unisexual flowers (eg Zea Mays, Ricinus Communis etc), there must be some mechanism as to produce two sexually distinct flowers from the same genotype. Since both the type ...
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2k views

Is ovum + ovum fertilization possible for human?

In humans is it possible to fertilize a ovum with another ovum from the same female subject? I already found some works in which the ovum is fertilized by a somatic cell (see e.g. this ), but I am ...
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130 views

Redundancy of the genetic code

One particular codon codes only for one amino acid, but an amino acid can be coded for by several different codons. Now according to the genetic code, the codon UUU ...
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3k views

Co-transformation of plasmids from the same incompatibility group

Can two plasmids with the same origin of replication (for example pBR322 ori) and thus from the same incompatibility group be successfully co-transformed in E. coli? What are the mechanisms that would ...
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53 views

How was gene therapy able to cure diseases through the transformation of actively dividing cells?

I thought that gene therapy, when performed on target cells that regenerate themselves constantly, can be effective for a limited time only. I.e., the effect gradually wears off after a while, ...
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60 views

Cell cycle selection

Is it possible to select from colonies only cells which are at a certain stage in the cell cycle? E.g. if I was trying to analyse expression of a number of genes during different stages of the cell ...
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209 views

Vigorous shaking for HFR interrupted mating

I am trying to reproduce E. coli interrupted mating using an HFR strain, and I read that the cultures should be vigorously shaken at times to interrupt the DNA transfer from the F+(HFR) donors to the ...
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113 views

At what rate do chromosomal rearrangements occur?

How often does chromosomal rearrangements occur? i.e. what is the rate of chromosomal rearrangements? I am interested about these kind of chromosomal rearrangements that are passed on to the ...
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335 views

Gene and alleles

This is a multiple choice question: Consider a gene, ABC, which codes for an enzyme involved in the metabolism of sugars. There are two known alleles of this gene, ABC1 and ABC2. Which statement ...
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1k views

Is there variation of AT/CG ratio along species?

Chargaff's rules say that the number of Adenine of the number of Thymine in a genome are equal (nA=nT) and similarly nC=nG. This makes obvious sense knowing that C binds to G and A to T. But what ...
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69 views

Can both the overlapping genes (in opposite strands) produce proteins?

I have recognized that both the forward and reverse transcripts from a genomic location code for protein products. Both do occur/express in the tissue of interest. In order to eliminate by chance ...
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124 views

Abbreviations for molecules: What are CheW, CheA, CheY?

I've encountered the abbreviations such as "CheW" and "CheA" for certain organic molecules. For example: Proteins associating with the Tar complex include the autophosphorylating protein kinase ...
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45 views

Genetics of epilepsy

Is epilepsy genetically inheritable? If yes, is it dominant?
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131 views

Restriction endonucleases are found in?

Quoting from : Scientific American July 1975 The Manipulation of genes by Stanley Cohen : Restriction endonucleases (and modification methylases) are widespread in microorganisms; genes for ...
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298 views

Which restriction enzyme would i use?

Plasmid pBr322 includes two genes that confer antibiotic resistance: a gene for ampicillin and a gene for tetracycline. The cutting site for the restriction enzyme BamH1 is in the middle pf the ...
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78 views

What came first? The DNA or the DNA polymerases?

I know this sounds a lot like chicken and egg question and while the latter has an answer, I am intrigued about the former. A modified form of the question would be, in the course of abiogenesis, ...
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667 views

What does this equation about DNA replication mean?

Could someone help me understand this equation please? I found it in a paper which said that it was DNA replication, but why? $\ce{dNTP + dNMP_{n} -> dNMP_{n +1} + PPi}$ I found that dNTP means ...
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403 views

Looking for good reference book in molecular biology [closed]

I am starting to work in molecular biology/ molecular genetic and I am looking for a really good book containing the main concepts and mostly the more recent techniques. I would be interested in a ...
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108 views

How does the DNA know which chain has error in repairing?

As we know, the DNA has more stability than RNA, if one chain has broken or accidentally distorted, it can be repaired by the other one. Suppose there is a segment AGTC, its peer is GACT. Now its ...
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52 views

ChIP-seq for histone modification not in agreement with RNA-seq for expression

I have ChIP-seq for H3K79me2 and H3K36me3 and RNA-seq data for treated and untreated samples. Those two histones mark active genes. Lets say, hypothetically, a peak caller finds differential sites at ...
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158 views

Explanation about cytogenetic notation

What is the correct meaning of cytogenetic notation "inv(4)(p13q22)" ? Inversions at chromosome 4, at the p arm 13 is inverted AND at q arm 22 is inverted OR Inversions at chromosome 4, the ...
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463 views

meaning of the “reads” keyword in terms of RNA-seq or next generation sequencing

I'm an undergraduate student at computer science and currently, I'm interested in bioinformatics. Today, I've started to read a paper about clustering and classification of non-coding RNAs can be ...