The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

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531 views

Why is mRNA needed in the Protein translation?

The original question was to predict the basic requirements for information storage. Then the discussion moved to why is it necessary to include mRNA in the protein translation process. Why can't ...
4
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1answer
25 views

How long is saliva viable?

Does anyone know if saliva can stay viable for about 5 days, before it gets suspended into a DNA genealogy vial for testing? Background: My brother wants to do a DNA genealogy test at a US testing ...
2
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1answer
10 views

How and why are cells irradiated in human-rodent hybrid cell biology?

When human-rodent hybrids are made the amount of human chromosome in the hybrid can be reduced by irradiation. Why and how exactly is this irradiation step performed?
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1answer
39 views

Is there a correlation between mutation rate and recombination rate?

I have in mind that homologous recombination (HR) can cause mutations (indels and substitutions). I am wondering if this is true and if it is, then I am wondering whether this effect is really ...
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1answer
35 views

How do signal transduction pathways utilize transcription factors to express a specific gene?

I have an inquiry regarding the regulation of genes via extracellular signaling. To my knowledge, in autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine cellular communication, large protein ligands that cannot ...
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1answer
17 views

Frequently Mutated Gene Definition

I have a question regarding defining frequently mutated genes which I was hoping someone could answer. Basically I have a list of 40 cell lines and 100 genes, and for each gene a cell line is ...
4
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1answer
140 views

Explanation about cytogenetic notation

What is the correct meaning of cytogenetic notation "inv(4)(p13q22)" ? Inversions at chromosome 4, at the p arm 13 is inverted AND at q arm 22 is inverted OR Inversions at chromosome 4, the ...
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2answers
43 views

How many copies of a gene?

I am studying mathematical models of transcription and translation and I am wondering: In a particular genome, how many copies of a gene coding for one particular protein should one expect? Are they ...
3
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1answer
41 views

Is sequencing error a function of the nucleotide being read?

Checking out on Google Scholar, I can see that for Illumina (just to consider one example) the sequencing error rate is of the order of 0.001-0.01 per nucleotide. Talking about sequencing error, ...
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0answers
22 views

Is a Ribonuclease Inhibitor protein the only mechanism employed by the human cell to protect cellular RNA from degradation by endoribonuclease?

Are there any other methods of protection for cellular RNA from degradation by endonuclease (specifically the Pancreatic Ribonuclease RNase II (Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin) and RNase III (Eosinophil ...
9
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3answers
268 views

Are the number of base pairs in a given chromosome same between different individuals?

This is a basic question but I couldn't find an answer through a web search; hopefully this is the right place to ask. Is the number of base pairs in a particular chromosome the same in all ...
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1answer
32 views

Gene and Protein isoform

What is the relationship between term "Gene isoform" and "Protein isoform"? Say a gene can make 3 isoforms, will it produce only (maximum) 3 isoform protein?
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3answers
825 views

Methods of nuclear transfection - nuclear transport

I am reading through the ENCODE papers, which is taking me well out of my comfort zone in terms of modern laboratory techniques. At the risk of asking a question which may well be thoroughly answered ...
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2answers
46 views

Why does a gene have two alleles? [closed]

Why does a gene have two alleles? When there is a gene for producing the color pigment for a flower, why are there there two alleles, producing either same color or different color (homozygous and ...
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3answers
56 views

Sense and anti sense strand

Why the sense strand is only involved in transcription though the antisense strand just has the compliment strand of the sense strand?
2
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1answer
31 views

DNA dependent RNA polymerase

How does a RNAP locate a specific gene? For instance, growth hormone has to be produced and the RNAP has to locate the gene. But the promoter (TATA box) will also be present infront of all cistrons. ...
0
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1answer
29 views

C Form DNA Base Pairs Per Turn

How does C-DNA have 9.33 base pairs per turn? The number of base pairs should be quantised. How can it be a decimal?
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2answers
280 views

What does this equation about DNA replication mean?

Could someone help me understand this equation please? I found it in a paper which said that it was DNA replication, but why? $\ce{dNTP + dNMP_{n} -> dNMP_{n +1} + PPi}$ I found that dNTP means ...
7
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1answer
128 views

What determines the number of chromosomes an organism carries?

This is an extension of this question about What limits chromosomal length?. I am wondering what could be the specific reasons behind the number of chromosomes an organism carries. In other words, ...
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1answer
44 views

What is a selectively neutral genotypic change?

I am reading the paper "Neutral evolution of mutational robustness". Because I am new to neutral evolution, I have a few questions. Firstly, from my understanding, genotypic neutrality means the ...
5
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3answers
106 views

Can we knock out Caspase-9 *and* avoid breast cancer phenotype in our mouse model?

I am trying to design a wet lab experiment with no wet lab experience to name. Right now, in my dream land, it would be excellent if it were possible to create a Caspase-9 knockout mouse (damage to ...
6
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0answers
37 views

Following DNA replication during S-phase of the cell-cycle, are all genomic regions subjected to the same stringent level of DNA-Repair?

To my (limited) understanding, there are 2 main ways that mutations can occur in DNA: Environmental (UV, etc) and mistakes during cell division. I was wondering if there is a mechanism that can give ...
8
votes
4answers
74 views

Are there constraints on where intron/exon boundaries occur with respect to the triplet codons of the reading frame?

I did a quick search (here and elsewhere) and couldn't find anything on this subject. If all introns in a given primary transcript were spliced out in the same way, then this wouldn't matter. But ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Why increasing the vector concentration does not increase the effeciency of bacterial transformation?

I was reading some old description of the protocols used for the transformation of bacterial cells. In the description I read that the transformation works best with low amount of DNA, and if we ...
3
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3answers
83 views

Looking for good reference book in molecular biology [closed]

I am starting to work in molecular biology/ molecular genetic and I am looking for a really good book containing the main concepts and mostly the more recent techniques. I would be interested in a ...
2
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1answer
27 views

What is the most reliable tumour suppressing gene for NSCLC?

I was looking at some tumour suppressing genes that can be helpful in diagnosing lung cancer (particularly NSCLC - Non-small-cell lung carcinoma) at an early stage. I came across a few such as p53, ...
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0answers
65 views

Recommend any Molecular lab LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System)

We are looking to develop or customize a LIMS for our molecular lab. Do you know of a LIMS that you've used in a molecular lab before, or one that could be used. Thanks for the help (Edit) Some of ...
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0answers
79 views

What metabolic processes do dormant and ungerminated seeds carry out?

What metabolic processes does a dormant embryo in a seed carry out? Seeds will not germinate, either because of a lack of favourable conditions, seed hibernation, or because of a genetically ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Which is the guideline to choose a molecular target to identify vertebrate hosts from arthropod bloodmeals?

There are some molecular targets to identify vertebrate hosts from arthropod bloodmeals including the Cyt b gene and the COI gene. Which are the standards or characteristics that I have to bear in ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Mutations/deletions with CRISPR

I need to stop some protein from being active and searching for some universal way to do so. In mammalians. With CRISPR it is possible to knock-out the entire gene. But it's a little complicate ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Do restriction enzymes on read 3' to 5'?

Every chart of palindromic restriction enzymes I've seen lists their restriction sites from 5' to 3', something like this: EcoR1 cuts GAATTC between the G and A: 5' NNNGAATTCNNN 3' --> ...
5
votes
1answer
109 views

During the process of correcting mutations via gene therapy, is the defective gene removed?

Just recently started learning about gene therapy, many websites explain that the corrected DNA can be added to the genome using a vector and all that. I just don't understand what happens to the ...
3
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1answer
37 views

Should gene therapy safety protocol include isolation?

In the case of a gene therapy trial where viral vectors are used to deliver genes into mammalian cells, including humans, should biosafety and ethical protocols include isolation of the patient as a ...
5
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1answer
70 views

Is it possible to express a mutant gene only in a specific tissue?

Imagine that someone tries to develop a knockout mouse for a gene, but this result in lethality for the homozygous. Is it possible to express that mutant gene only in a specific tissue of interest to ...
3
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1answer
46 views

Why do genes with closely related functions often reside on different chromosomes?

Why do genes with closely related products are so often positioned on different chromosomes? To illustrate what I mean, here is an example from immunology: the invariant region of MHC is on ...
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1answer
68 views

“Enhancers” of enhancers?

I am looking for examples (if any) of genomic regions which regulates the activity of enhancers, either augmenting or reducing it. Essentially some kind of enhancers (or repressors) of enhancers to ...
2
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2answers
424 views

Viral Mutation Mechanism

I think I have a wrong concept about viral mutation process. First of all what is mutation actually? I mean, I know it's a sudden change in DNA, happening when subjected to mutagenic agents. But can ...
5
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2answers
49 views

Why is 5S-rRNA is different from other rRNAs in place of transcription and usage of RNA polymerase?

While transcription of rRNAs happens in nucleolus mediated by RNA Polymerase-I, we see that 5S-rRNA is transcribed elsewhere by RNA Polymerase-III. What is the cause and why?
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0answers
30 views

Do The Traces Genetic Diseases Remain in families?

I know that there are certain diseases that are predominant on genes. But, is there any sort of surety that if parents are suffering from a disorder then their offspring has to suffer from the same. ...
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1answer
56 views

Do nucleosomes ever completely unwrap during transcription?

In eukaryotic transcription will the nucleosomes ever completely unwind the DNA and the histone complex disassemble? If an operon is more 160 base pairs it seems it must.
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1answer
58 views

Markers for human genetic mapping

For human genetic mapping several different types of markers are used: RFLPs (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms) VNTRs (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) such as mini- and microsatellites ...
3
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1answer
37 views

What is the statistical relationship between radioactivity and mutation rate?

This question tries to narrow down the scope of that question. What is the statistical relationship between radioactivity and mutation rate? By how much would the mutation rate be lowered in a ...
8
votes
3answers
215 views

Splice in with CRISPR/Cas

I need to splice a gene into a human cell genome, with highest rate possible. I mean, doesn't really matter where the gene enters, nor does it matter if some cells die as a result of this. CRISPR ...
2
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0answers
46 views

CRISPR Knock in

Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, it is possible that after inducing a DSB with the Cas9 endonuclease guided with an RNA designed by the user and using a template DNA, get a desired Knock-In (KI) by ...
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0answers
44 views

Primer Designing [closed]

I have a basic idea about the requirements in primer designing. Basically my knowledge is limited to theoretical knowledge and have no experience in actual primer designing. And also I have a basic ...
9
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1answer
197 views

RNA migrating slower than DNA on Formaldehyde Gel?

So I ran into an interesting problem. I'm getting a linear DNA band that is twice as long (4x bases, but as denatured probably only 2x) as an RNA band running at the same size in a formaldehyde gel. ...
6
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2answers
55 views

Can molecular genetics make a boolean variable from a continuous variable?

In the same kind of idea than this question. Gene expression are regulated through complex interactions. The concentration of enhancers and repressors is an important aspect that dictate the level of ...
7
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1answer
67 views

Do DNA repressors exist?

I know about enhancers and the mechanism that lead them to increase the gene expression of their targets but I was wondering if similarly DNA repressors exist. I know about protein repressors but I am ...
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vote
1answer
25 views

How to correlate the pattern by which CAP activator from E.coli binds to DNA and its mechanism of action?

The catabolite activator protein (CAP) activates the expression of more than 100 genes involved in secondary sugar metabolism in E.coli. Apparently, it always binds in sites that are away from -10 and ...
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2answers
839 views

Are all mutagens carcinogens?

Not all carcinogens are mutagens. Alcohol and estrogen, for example, does not damage DNA. It's one of the assumptions of the Ames test that mutagenicity implies carcinogenicity, but is this always ...