The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

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What is meant by “Expression” of Non-Coding RNA?

I was having a look at lncRNAdb and its help says: The ENCODE project gene annotation list, GENCODE, has predicted that the human genome contains 14,470 lncRNAs whereas only a small proportion of ...
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2answers
122 views

Extending a small fragment of DNA

Is there a way to extend a small fragment of DNA, say 150 bp, by making copies of itself and attaching each copy of that small fragment to the end of that 150 bp sequence? For example, I want a 1 ...
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1answer
21 views

T7 vs pBAD promoter strength

How do pBAD and T7 promoter strengths compare when pBAD is induced under conditions which would lead to its highest strength? Are there any papers that compare the two inducible promoter systems?
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55 views

What makes DNA sequences most different/recognizable from a biological perspective? [duplicate]

We can pretty easily quantify the amount difference between two different strings/sequences of characters. For example, if we take the words trebuchet and trebucket, we can say they have a Levenshtein ...
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99 views

Following DNA replication during S-phase of the cell-cycle, are all genomic regions subjected to the same stringent level of DNA-Repair?

To my (limited) understanding, there are 2 main ways that mutations can occur in DNA: Environmental (UV, etc) and mistakes during cell division. I was wondering if there is a mechanism that can give ...
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1answer
2k views

Does a woman contain all the genes needed to make a man?

I know the answer of inverse is at here, but how about this question? I also read this question, can I imply to human that a woman also contain all the genes needed to make a man? Edit: ok , I ...
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3answers
80 views

Do transcripts always start and end with exons?

I realized that in all cases of "RefSeq Genes" annotations of hg19 I looked at spliced transcripts start (and end) with an exon. From the annotation there is no evidence of any sequence upstream or ...
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1answer
31 views

Why does pETDuet-1 only have one T7 terminator but two T7 promoters?

Why does pETDuet-1 only have one T7 terminator but two T7 promoters (vector map below)? Is there any advantage of having only one terminator? There are going to be two mRNAs transcribed from this ...
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18 views

What is the highest number of genes expressed under one T7 promoter?

What is the highest number of genes expressed under one T7 promoter? Also, what is the longest polycistronic mRNA? I am interested in the context of heterologously expressing biosynthetic gene ...
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1answer
22 views

Does mechanotransduction of cells play a role in the biocompatibility of titanium?

What exactly is mechanotransduction as the information varies between sources. Some sources indicate that mechanotransduction is the underlying principle where cells pull on the surface they grow on ...
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21 views

What the gene variation detection result can tell us about a cancer [duplicate]

We do a research on a particular cancer, now we have a result of the gene variation detection . What next steps do we need to do? we don't have a clear picture about this. Can you give us some ...
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2answers
54 views

Which strand of a gene specifies a protein? [closed]

A gene is a segment of DNA (I hope double stranded) and each strand when transcribed form a mRNA and after being translated a protein. As from each gene there are two proteins that are being formed. ...
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1answer
73 views

Genomic DNA isolation from wheat

Can I use dry seed, wheat for example, in place of young leaves for isolation and purification of genomic DNA for PCR amplification? The goal of my experiment is to validate a novel gene which is ...
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1answer
68 views

Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?

I would be very happy if someone can help me to find the answers for the following related questions. Can one exon have many stop codons? Can protein synthesis happen, if the stop codon is at the ...
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1answer
70 views

Can both the overlapping genes (in opposite strands) produce proteins?

I have recognized that both the forward and reverse transcripts from a genomic location code for protein products. Both do occur/express in the tissue of interest. In order to eliminate by chance ...
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3answers
13k views

What's the difference between shotgun sequencing and clone based sequencing?

In a lecture during my undergraduate degree we were introduced to the race to complete the human genome. Celera were competing with Sanger and collaborators to sequence the human genome. Celera ...
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1answer
74 views

Can difference in the expression potential of alleles lead to dominance?

Several hour ago I was in thoughts what allele dominance really means on molecular level. As we know from basic genetics, if the organism had Aa type of some gene ...
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517 views

Do other animals have different blood types?

Humans have the ABO and Rhesus blood typing systems. I have two questions about it: Why have we evolved these blood types? Do other animals have different blood types as well?
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47 views

mutant and variant differentiation

Can anyone clearly differentiate between a variant and a mutant in genetics. I am confusing these terms a bit, as the evolutionary aspect also comes to my mind.
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1answer
35 views

How much time do the different mechanisms of gene regulation need to take effect?

I am thinking of the major regulatory mechanisms, like general transcription factors, activators, repressors, and RNA interference. If non-active regulator genes using each of the different ...
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2answers
91 views

Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
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1answer
4k views

Difference between mutation and DNA damage

What is the strict difference between mutation and DNA damage? As far as I understand it, a mutation is an alteration in the genetic sequence, having "tricked" the repairing machinery and thus ...
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1answer
13 views

When should you use a stringent plasmid

I was wondering if anyone had good examples of when you would want to use a stringent plasmid vs a relaxed plasmid in a research setting. Thanks
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1answer
64 views

How to read this DNA inversion diagram?

In the following diagram about chromosome inversion, I don't understand: Why do we need to take the reverse complement from step 1 to 2? Isn't inversion just reversing the bases in the region? How ...
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22 views

Do any gaps in DNA during cell division (meiosis in particular) lead to crossover?

I have some gaps in the knowledge abour crossover. I know, that crossover is connected with reparation process. I'd like to know if all gaps in chromosomes lead to crossover (reparation based on 2d ...
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2answers
878 views

Viral Mutation Mechanism

I think I have a wrong concept about viral mutation process. First of all what is mutation actually? I mean, I know it's a sudden change in DNA, happening when subjected to mutagenic agents. But can ...
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23 views

UV light-induced mutagenesis during gel extraction

this is a very short question I did not find the answer for online, neither on this nor other fora. At the beginning of my cloning protocol, I extracted the band with the sequence of interest directly ...
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Trouble understanding overlapping genes.

I read the wikipedia passage on overlapping genes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overlapping_gene The Tandem overlaps they speak of make sense to me, as I understand that their are different reading ...
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1answer
35 views

Why are some genomic regions sequenced more than the others?

We have to normalise read count data from RNA-Seq experiments in order to account for the fact that some genomic regions are mapped more than others. i.e. we get the tags per million reads (TPM). In ...
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1answer
27 views

Synthesis of an additional DNA in Pachytene and Zygotene [closed]

I've read, that in Pachytene and Zygotene additional DNA material is synthesized, about 0,3, 0,1% respectively. Why is it so?
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0answers
27 views

How accurate are proteomic-based biomarkers of cancer? [closed]

Currently protein expression is one of the widely used biomarker types. For example, any $i^{th}$ protein could be a selected biomarker. How can a minute change in single protein concentration ...
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1answer
73 views

What is the difference between the mitotic spindle and microtubules?

In mitosis, I understand that the centromeres line up on the spindle. I also know that the centrioles form microtubles between the centromeres during mitosis in the metaphase. But, are microtubles ...
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0answers
31 views

Are all genes transcribed in differentiated cells?

My textbook tells me that it’s specific transcription factors that allow for a different set of genes to be expressed in different cells (differential gene expression). My book gives the example of ...
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1answer
220 views

During the process of correcting mutations via gene therapy, is the defective gene removed?

Just recently started learning about gene therapy, many websites explain that the corrected DNA can be added to the genome using a vector and all that. I just don't understand what happens to the ...
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1answer
19 views

Molecules, Targets and Isoforms

I have a question. Given a molecule A and two isoforms of a gene X, Y, and the knowledge that A targets X. Can I infere from this anything about whether A targets Y? As a motivation think about ...
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1answer
67 views

What is two-start or zigzag model of 30 nm chromatin fibre?

I read some webpages describing the two-start model but could not get it. I'll be obliged if someone helped me understand the topic. The websites I have been through are: ...
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42 views

How can a mutator gene can cause a mutation when it is shut off? [closed]

defination of "Mutator" - a gene that increases the rate of mutation of one or more other genes. However, in the book "Molecular Biology of the Cell" (bruce alberts) it states that when a mutator is ...
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2answers
37 views

What separates gene loci?

Introns are sections of noncoding DNA that separate exons within a gene locus. However, between different gene loci, I also would assume there to be noncoding regions of DNA. What are these regions ...
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1answer
53 views

How was gene therapy able to cure diseases through the transformation of actively dividing cells?

I thought that gene therapy, when performed on target cells that regenerate themselves constantly, can be effective for a limited time only. I.e., the effect gradually wears off after a while, ...
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1answer
57 views

How do the major and minor grooves in the DNA helix arise?

I understand that they arise due to the pairing of bases of two opposite stands and are sites through which important proteins needed for replication and transcription of DNA interact. But I don't get ...
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1answer
65 views

What is positive and negative supercoiling?

Is the following correct? Positive supercoiling = the coiling of DNA helix (B-DNA) on itself during intesified coiling of the two DNA stands in right handed direction negative supercoiling = the ...
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Mosaic segregation in C. elegans

How can mosaic segregation be used in C. elegans? Can it tell us where a given gene is expressed, or needs to be expressed for worm survival?
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50 views

Does DNA polymerase I require a $3^\prime$ end?

DNA polymerase III adds nucleotides in the $5^\prime \rightarrow 3^\prime$ direction because it can only add nucleotides to the $3^\prime$ end of the previous nucleotide. This is why it requires a ...
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25 views

Hydrogen bonding and the blocking thereof in nucleic acids during nuclear processes

In transcription, RNA polymerase unwinds the DNA double helix and begins attaching RNA nucleotides to the template strand. In its wake, the DNA double helix closes back—this is only natural, seeing as ...
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1answer
40 views

Mitochondrial Genetic code

We know that the genetic code is universal. My query is why the mitochondrial genetic code is different from universal genetic code?
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1answer
32 views

Why is mRNA used as a biomarker for cancer over tRNA or rRNA?

I cannot find a clear explanation for why mRNA is used as cancer biomarker and not tRNA or rRNA. Is there something peculiar about mRNA which cannot be fulfilled by tRNA or rRNA?
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1answer
22 views

What are in common between transcription factors?

In terms of their structures (primary to tertiary) and locations? Why do they have these commonalities? Or are any of these commonalities critical to their functions?
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66 views

What type of point mutation and chromosomal mutation cause Albinism in humans?

First of all, I know that OCA1 (Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 1) is autosomal recessive which means that both parents-who are unaffected-have to pass down one copy of a mutated gene in order to ...
5
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1answer
92 views

Why are fifth order Markov Models, the ones most often used for gene prediction?

As far as we know that smallest polypeptide chain length is 60 amino acids - so if we found an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of about 60 codons without the interruption of stop codon we can consider it to ...