The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

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Exon skipping in mammals

I've heard from several sources that the predominant form of alternative splicing (at least in mammals) is exon skipping. However, my personal evidence is only anecdotal: I've heard it and read it, ...
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Gibson assembly - primer design with A and T rich regions

I have question about Gibson assembly. I have done it several times and it always worked okay for us, but now I want to assemble together a fragment which has sequence like this: ...
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15 views

how far are SNP's and miRNA related [closed]

Recent findings indicate that SNPs could create, destroy, or modify the efficiency of miRNA binding to the 3'UTR of a gene, resulting in gene dysregulation. How well can we establish a relationship ...
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16 views

Cell targets of Glybera

So we know that there is a first gene therapy drug in the market out there called Alipogene tiparvovec to address lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LPLD) at a genetic level. Does this genetic drug ...
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49 views

Are the DNA codon mappings arbitrary?

I am a Biology novice so I apologize in advance if I state anything incorrectly.... My question is, are the DNA codon mappings arbitrary? I understand that the DNA code is made up of codons which ...
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19 views

How loss of heterozygosity influence expression levels of a gene ?

I am looking at a genomic region associated with a vascular diseases; this region have loss of heterozygosity. I am wondering how the expression level of the genes in the regions will be affected ...
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65 views

At what rate do chromosomal rearrangements occur?

How often does chromosomal rearrangements occur? i.e. what is the rate of chromosomal rearrangements? I am interested about these kind of chromosomal rearrangements that are passed on to the ...
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61 views

New vs classical genome editing methods

I would like to inquire on the differences between the old classical genome editing method in comparison to the new genome editing methods such as CRISPR/Cas9. By old classical method i mean the use ...
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11 views

How does Temperature influences the rate of protein turnover?

Question How (quantitatively speaking) does temperature influences rate of turnover of transcription factors? Which protein? As I am not looking for any accurate number I am talking about an ...
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21 views

Question about mutation of multiple nuclei?

If an organism with multiple nuclei, such as the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, was to be exposed to a mutagen, such as 5-bromouracil, what would be the effect (besides death)? Especially if ...
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41 views

How can I download a gene sequence from GenBank (NCBI)? [closed]

Could you tell me the steps to find and download a gene sequence from GeneBank? I would appreciate your help.
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19 views

Linkage disequilibrium D sign

Linkage disequilibrium D equals D=x11−p1⋅q1 where: Haplotype > Frequency A1B1 > x11 A1B2 > x12 A2B1 > x21 A2B2 > x22 and Allele Frequency A1 > ...
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53 views

Why aren't introns found on the ends of pre-RNA?

We recently learned in genetics class that exons always cap the ends of nascent RNA. I have been trying to figure out the reason why introns can't instead be found on the ends instead of exons. The ...
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60 views

What is the point of DNA sequencing?

This is a very very basic question. I've looked at methods such as chromosome sequencing and shotgun sequencing. Wikipedia says that: ...
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32 views

Why do we use DNA sequencing methods such as shotgun?

I am learning about DNA cloning for the first time. What I understand is that, in order to clone DNA, we break-up the original gene into shreds. Then try to piece it back together. Why exactly do we ...
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1answer
47 views

Influence of temperature on protein binding and decay rates

For computer modeling purposes, I am looking for some referenced quantitative measurements of the effect(s) of temperature on the dynamic of biochemical reactions. Question In particular, my ...
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44 views

Are there known downsides to removing UV mutation hotspots to prevent some skin cancers (Genetic sunblock)?

Khavari et al. recently demonstrated that a significant fraction of one of the major forms of skin cancer (cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas) are associated with a mutated KNSTRN gene (a protein ...
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1answer
55 views

Influence of temperature on transcription, protein binding and decay rates

I am the kind of biologist who doesn't know much about molecular genetics and about the dynamic of biochemical reactions. Question My question concerns the influence of temperature on the dynamic of ...
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1answer
30 views

what is the function of satellite in a chromosome?

What is the specific function of a satellite in a chromosome ? How are sat-chromosomes different from others ? On molecular basis, what are the functional advantages of it ?
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19 views

Why can't NMR be used on large RNA molecules?

While reading my Molecular Bio textbook, I came across a sentence that stated that NMR cannot be used on large RNA molecules to determine their structure. Why is this? Is it because RNA is single ...
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1answer
21 views

How to identify the genes that distal enhancers pair?

I am writing a project proposal and I have to talk about this problem: how to identify the genes that distal enhancers pair? I am really new to this topic and I don't know what it is all about. I ...
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215 views

Why does replication require primers while transcription does not?

In transcription, there is no need for any primer. I guess the basic mechanism of DNA polymerase & RNA polymerase is the same. So why does replication have the need for a primer?
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1answer
41 views

Why do oncogenes show genetic dominance?

As we know that tumor suppressor gene causes cancer only when both the alleles are recessive in nature.But in case of oncogenes if only one allele is dominant it can cause cancer.Why in case of ...
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1answer
44 views

What is wrong with this analogy: Individuals are to alleles what governments are to individuals

I'm an amateur when it comes to genetics, I'm hoping to learn something from the corrections. I am taking epigenetics into account (kind of); all 3 entities are susceptible to external physical ...
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34 views

Assembling DNA fragments with ~10kb overlap in vitro

Let's say I have two fragments of bacterial DNA (~50kb in length each) that overlap on the ends by roughly ~10kb; the overlap sequences are unknown. I would like to assemble these into longer ...
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1answer
27 views

Heterochromatin production limitations

Currently playing with some ideas for a project and needed some guidance. I am wondering, both in Drosophila melanogaster and in general, is the amount of heterochromatin a cell/nucleus can produce ...
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2answers
106 views

Heterochromatin binding sites position information

I am working on a project and I'm trying to find data on the position of genes and heterochromatin binding sites such as HP1 in Drosophila melanogaster. Is this information available for the DGRP ...
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1answer
164 views

what is the difference between “cistron” and “gene”

I'm asking after reading the cognate wikipedia.en article on "cistron". I still am not sure about the difference of the two terms. To me it seems valid to picture a "cistron" as the genome wide set ...
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3answers
104 views

Restriction endonucleases are found in?

Quoting from : Scientific American July 1975 The Manipulation of genes by Stanley Cohen : Restriction endonucleases (and modification methylases) are widespread in microorganisms; genes for ...
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47 views

Various Genetic Loads and their Definitions

In population genetics, we talk about several types of genetic loads (also called just loads). I am asking for a exhaustive list and a short definition. Here are for example some genetic loads that ...
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1answer
47 views

What is the close and related genome used for in Gene models?

all I am a little bit confused about using the related genome or reference genome. When we have a reference genome, we can do alignment. Also we can do the assembly. Can you give some more reason ...
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94 views

Detecting food fraud

There's undoubtedly more than one way to do this, but if a DIY biologist were to attempt to detect food fraud (e.g. as done by students from Stanford University and Trinity School, Manhattan with ...
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33 views

Study case of the inheritance system of Oenothera

I've been told some interesting facts about oenothera. Apparently in this species some lineages have been through some translocations and in results to these translocations and in consequence, some ...
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40 views

Inbreeding depression and dominance

From this article, second paragraph of the second page A classic theoretical result is that the mean of a character controlled by a single locus $i$ with two alleles $A_{i1}$ and $A_{i2}$ is only ...
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1answer
54 views

Coefficient of relationship and path of coefficient

A path of coefficient of relationship is defined as $$\rho_{AO} = \left( \frac{1}{2}\right)^n \sqrt { \frac{1+f_A}{1+f_O}}$$ This SE post discusses this definition From this, the coefficient of ...
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42 views

Inbreeding Coefficient and Coefficient of Relationship

Wikipedia gives the following formula to calculate a "path of coefficient of relationship" between an ancestor $A$ and an offspring $O$: $$\rho_{AO} = 2^{-n} \left( \frac{1+f_A}{1+f_O} \right)^{1/2} ...
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24 views

Why does the stability of YAC increase with size?

From Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry : The stability of YAC increases with size (up to a limit). Those with inserts of less than 100000 are gradually lost during mitosis. Why does this ...
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1answer
39 views

Book Recommendation: Complex Traits and Complex Genetic Architecture

I am looking for a book (or any good source of information) that offers an in-depth discussion and models about the evolution and analysis of complex traits and complex genetic architecture. Do you ...
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1answer
74 views

What is the current molecular explanation of Mendel's pea cross?

With reference to the simplest Punnet square for Mendel's pea plant experiments it occurred to me that I could not connect the little I know about genetics to the little I know about molecules. The ...
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1answer
61 views

Studying genetics [closed]

I am interested in studying disorders that are genetic in origin. However, I am having difficulty in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding processes such as meiosis, mitosis, and ...
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1answer
47 views

Do cell walls prevent cancer?

To my knowledge plants do not have an uncontrolled growth disease similar to cancer. Is the function by which they avoid uncontrolled growth related to their cell wall and preventing damage to ...
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1answer
88 views

How does GC-content evolve?

Background GC-content refers to the frequency of base pairs that are either C or G in the genome, or in other words the number of GC base pairs divided by the addition of the number of GC base pairs ...
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1answer
25 views

Property of E.coli harboring F element

From Genetics by Ursula Goodenough E.coli harboring an F element are endowed with a number of phenotypic traits : 1.They are sensitive to infection by ssRNA phages and certain ssDNA phages. ...
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34 views

Cloning a gene of an organism with an nonsequenced genome

What would be the best protocol to clone a gene about 5kb in size? The genome is not sequenced, but the gene itself very similar to orthologous genes of organisms with known sequences.
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1answer
66 views

Understanding DNA supercoiling

While trying to understand DNA supercoiling, I came across these lines in the book Genetics by Ursula Goodenough : All natural DNA is superhelical. The axis of the duplex itself follows a ...
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25 views

Is it reasonable to assume that RNA polymerase would bind preferentially to the promoter of the long allele of the SERT gene?

I'm trying to come up with an idea for a school project (a hypothetical research study). I'm looking at depression and the serotonin transporter gene, which is highly expressed in the human ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Transport of mammalian insulin in vivo

What is the mechanism for transport of insulin in mammalian cells?
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35 views

Paracentric Inversion and Mutations Question Help Needed

Would someone please be able to help with questons 3 or 4. (one of the at least please) please don't report his as off-topic. first, this is NOT a homeowork question. It's a practice question I am ...
4
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1answer
125 views

Sexual Differentiation in Monoecious plants with unisexual flowers

In monoecious plants having unisexual flowers (eg Zea Mays, Ricinus Communis etc), there must be some mechanism as to produce two sexually distinct flowers from the same genotype. Since both the type ...
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1answer
104 views

How is a stem-cell induced to assimilate a knock-in DNA construct?

While looking at (daylight) color perception I came across a paper by Jeremy Nathans (et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., vol. 100 no. 20, 2003, full text here) in which he describes the creation of a ...