The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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Why can't we use computer mouse like a pencil? [on hold]

I have seen a lot of artists use a graphics tablets while drawing/painting on a computer. I tried drawing on a computer using a mouse, and its worse than what I can draw on paper with a pencil (I'm ...
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6 views

Why does referred visceral pain not have a referred cutanous pain counterpart?

Most textbooks (for example: Neuroscience, by Dale Purves and colleagues) describes referred pain from visceral nociceptors as caused by synapsing of the afferent nociceptive signals on secondary ...
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19 views

Mitochodria's Role For Neuron Regrowth

Recently an interesting study has reported. Zhou et al., 2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10...3/jcb.201605101 According to this study, enhancing anterograde axon transport of mitochondria is ...
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1answer
66 views

How do neurons find each other?

Neurons form complicated networks in brains, but their connections can't be random (at least not entirely). Brains function similarly among all members of individual species, and that functionality is ...
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1answer
32 views

How does stimulus reach neural threshold?

I understand that when the stimulus into a neuron is greater than the threshold it triggers the action potential. Do all the contributing stimulus have to occur at the same time, or can they occur ...
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14 views

Is artificial control over neural transmission possible?

We know that neurons transmits electrical signals. At the present we have instruments to observe neural transmissions, but is it possible to interfere in its transmission from outside electrical ...
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1answer
284 views

What's the mechanism for being mentally tired?

I notice that after long tests, or long periods of critical thinking, my body and mind feel noticeably tired. Why does this happen? Are the neurons in my head not firing as quickly, or is there just a ...
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9 views

Link between hypoglycemic events in Type 1 diabetics and clinical anxiety?

I recognize that the scientific community is aware that the chemical stress pathway is mediated by glucocorticoids. The pathway response initializes as a result of some sort of stress (potentially ...
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22 views

Sensory neurons, interneurons and motor neurons - recognizing the type of neuron at microscopy images

Is there a simple way to distinguish between sensory neurons and interneurons and motor neurons at the microscopic images? I read a little bit about Open Connectome Project. Is there a possibility of ...
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17 views

How do afferent mechanoreceptors work on the finger pads?

I'm having some difficulty understanding how the afferent signals are sensed in the finger pads. My understanding is that for mechanoreceptors (SA1, SA2, RA1, RA2), as the indenting force increases on ...
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10 views

Membrane resistance of a neuron

I am about to simulate a neuron activity with the "Leaky Integrate and Fire" neuron model. But for that I need the membrane resistance. I was really looking a lot online, but I just cant find a value. ...
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1answer
16 views

Neuron activity on body parts measurable?

Is it possible to measure the neuron activity on body parts like the back or the arm? Or is this done already? Of course neuron activity can be measured on the scalp using an EEG. I wonder if similar ...
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1answer
66 views

Where exactly is pleasure

Question from an outsider: have we been able to pinpoint where exactly the feeling of pleasure comes from? I know that there are several types of pleasure, I'm talking about the 'liking'. If that ...
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3k views

Why do smaller mammals move intermittently?

I was watching a nice little video on youtube but couldn't help but notice how snappy smaller animals such as rats and chipmunks move. By snappy I mean how the animal moves in almost discrete states ...
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8 views

Why are high pitched sounds sensed at the base of the cochlea, i.e. what causes the tonotopic organsiation

I'm trying to understand why high tones are registered in the way that they are. I had gathered that the width of the cochlea filtered out higher and higher frequencies as sound traveled up the ...
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13 views

Is there a quantifiable amount of time by which neuroplasticity accelerates learning rate? [closed]

Specifically, are there any studies that compare, to use a hypothetical example, the amount of time it takes an adolescent to exhibit mastery of a concept as compared to an adult, thus determining the ...
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545 views

Can parts of a human brain be asleep independently of each other, or vary in the times required for them to fall asleep?

I know that some birds and marine animals can continue complicated activity (swimming, flying?) while one hemisphere of their brain is asleep. I'm interested if human brain has some parts of it that ...
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1answer
43 views

What are tail currents?

This is a voltage clamp on an ion channel. When the voltage is stopped there is a still a current at the end (the tail current). I understand that the gates aren't completely closed because of which ...
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30 views

Forgot to cool slides before washing

I just finished an immunofluorescence experiment and I'm wondering what went wrong. The tissues seem dimmer than they should be. One mistake I made was: I completed the antigen retrieval step, in a ...
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1answer
2k views

What happens in your brain when you receive information which causes you to bristle?

I'm talking about moments when you watch a film and you bristle, or when you listen to music, etc. What kind of neurotransmitter flow changes?
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149 views

What are the main mechanisms of interaction between the nervous and immune systems?

We know from pop science that our psychological states have an effect on our immune systems ("worrying ourselves sick", etc.), but what are the actual mechanisms through which our nervous systems pass ...
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9 views

Feedback mechanisms for the dynorphin-kappa opioid system?

(this is all happening in the brain). Also it's best to go context-first I think (1) Normally if you take an agonist drug that hits a receptor "x", eventually the brain will downregulate the density ...
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1answer
69 views

Why are so many recreational drugs serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonists?

I found out that many psychoactive drugs partially activate the 5HT1A receptor. Looking at Wikipedia, these include MDMA, LSD, CBD, Psliocybin/Psilocin, amphetamine and various other psychedelics, and ...
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1answer
76 views

How do heredity and regression to the mean work with respect to intelligence?

I am trying to understand the heredity of intelligence between generations in general, and how regression to the mean works in detail in particular. The answer I'm looking for should preferably answer ...
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1answer
85 views

Is there a biological explanation for perceived deeper cognition whilst on cannabis?

Cannabis has been associated with literature, arts, and culture for centuries. There are a few features of the drugs affect on the human mind that account for this, however it remains illegal in most ...
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2answers
329 views

What is the biological principle of this “holotropic breathwork” technique?

Holotropic breathwork is a non-drug technique developed by Stanislav Grof used in psychotherapy. The therapy as a whole is usually called holotropic breathwork (at least by Grof himself) and will most ...
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43 views

Is there an evolutionary advantage associated with migraine? [duplicate]

I have read Wikipedia article on Genetics of migraine headaches and I don't buy it Because genetics influence susceptibility to migraine, it can be shaped by evolution. Fitness-impairing ...
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2answers
74 views

What neurons make up the CNS?

I generally see it written that there are three types of neurons, classified by projection: (1) sensory neurons, (2) interneurons, and (3) motor neurons. Now, in the CNS, I don’t think there would be ...
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29 views

Nerve endings on the skin

We can perceive sensation of pain if we are poked on any part of the skin. Does this mean there is a nerve ending at every point on the skin? Does this also mean that each of these nerves go all ...
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2answers
62 views

Why do typical acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (like carbamates) have a greater parasympathetic effect than a sympathetic effect?

I understand that the post-ganglionic neurones of the sympathetic system are adrenergic, but surely these neurones will be excited to the same extent as the parasympathetic post-ganglionic neurones (...
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1answer
226 views

Relationship between action potentials and EEG recordings

It is possible that I am overthinking this but I have difficulties relating the neural activation to the amplitude and frequency of EEG recordings. For example; if at the EEG location P3/P4 we ...
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1answer
116 views

Alpha wave frequency variance in EEG of single subject over period of a few hours?

I have an Emotiv EPOC (EEG headset: 128 SPS, notch filter @60 Hz, felt saline contacts) I've been playing around with. Over the course of two or three hours using CCA to plot an SNR contour against ...
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2answers
72 views

How does the brain know what to remember and what not?

People remember some information for example when learning for an exam, or remember to go to a shop after work etc., but we don't remember usually much other stuff like people passing us, what was the ...
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1answer
58 views

Do all different types of neurons serve different roles?

I know from my basic education in neurology that the brain has various sorts of neurons. These are usually bunched into 3 different categories (sensory, moto and interneurons). I read in a recently ...
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35 views

What information do bipolar cells encode?

Short version: I don't see what information on-centre bipolar cells are actually capturing. Longer: Actually, the question could be extended to on-centre retinal cells as well, but I'll focus on ...
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4answers
1k views

Is it possible to feel pain in some part of a body, but the pain “feeling” is introduced somewhere else?

Is it possible to feel pain in some part of a body, but that the cause of the pain is situated elsewhere in the body? For example, somebody feels pain in his toe, but it turns out that this pain is ...
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48 views

What happens to the human brain when unconscious?

What part of the brain gets affected and does it harm the brain? Thank you I just needed some extra info for a video I'm making.
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1answer
24 views

Voltage sensitive dyes technique: What is the underlying measure?

I just discovered voltage sensitive dyes technique: first of all what imaging techniques do we use? And I have seen that figures are labeled with ΔF/F0, what does it stands for?
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1answer
776 views

How does the brain avoid feedback loops?

The article Ants Swarm Like Brains Think really helped me to understand the way that neurons which are pretty dumb on their own (like ants) can work together to create a pretty genius system (a brain ...
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1answer
2k views

Why can action potentials not be initiated at dendrites?

Why are action potentials not initiated at dendrites, although dendrites are the first to receive input from the presynaptic cell? In fact, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) at the dendrites ...
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31 views

Where to go next with clustered C elegans neuronal time series

I'm doing some independent research with the C Elegans nervous system (with the OpenWorm project) and was looking for some guidance as to where I should go next. Right now, I'm dealing with calcium ...
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28 views

Do ion channels block at these temperatures?

I found this paper and it says nerve axons cold block at temperatures near 0C. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1113/jphysiol.1968.sp008656/pdf Does this mean ion channels also block (due to ...
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2answers
268 views

Are unilaterally deaf people able to determine where sound comes from?

My question is on people deafened in one ear, but normal hearing in the other. Time and level differences between the two ears are only part of how the human body can localize the source of the sound....
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2answers
59 views

Does the creation of memory involve mRNAs crossing the synaptic gap?

There is a diagram from a book titled "Teaching with the brain in mind". The diagram shows The diagram appears to show that the "creation of memory" involves "messages coded by RNA" moving through ...
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1answer
59 views

How can neurons divide without centrioles?

I have read in my studies that neurons lack centrioles. If that is so, then how is it possible that new neurons are added to our brain? Does this have anything to do with memory loss?
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5k views

Are brain cells replaced over time?

You know how your cells die all the time and new ones are made to replace them, so you practically have a new body every maybe 5 years? Many people say you become a completely different person every ...
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2answers
115 views

Does caffeine actually enhance cognition?

I have heard, respectively: Caffeine measurably enhances cognitive function. Caffeine does not measurably enhance cognitive function in any significant way. Caffeine enhances cognitive function, but ...
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0answers
22 views

How much yogurt would one have to consume to have a noticeable effect on neurotransmitters [closed]

I read several recent articles that proposed a link between bacteria in our gut and neurotransmitters in our brain. For instance http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/24997036/ I am curious how much ...
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2answers
849 views

What is the difference between clinical and non-clinical depression, and is there a term for different severity of the bipolar disorder?

I was looking for a term which describes a bipolar disorder of lesser severity. I know from experience from someone I know well, what a very severe case of the bipolar disorder looks like, when an ...
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1answer
93 views

How does the synaptic cleft exist?

I'm not asking why the synaptic cleft exists, i.e. what function it holds, rather how. So I know that the neurotransmitter diffuses across it, it is 20-40 nm wide and contains basal lamina (in NMJs at ...