The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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Can the human eye distinguish colors in the periphery?

In the back of my mind I have the idea that human eyes can't notice the color of objects in the far periphery, and that any subjective perception of colors is done by the brain that tries to fill in ...
2
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1answer
37 views

Kinesin-5 / cytoplasmic dynein spatial density distribution in neurons

Is there some way to experimentally determine the density distribution of Kinesin and Dynein in a Neuron? Fluorescence labeling would be impossible(?) as GFP markers would probably alter the motor ...
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1answer
50 views

How does anger relate to blood pressure?

Anger is an emotion generated by neural processes in the brain and is associated with elevated blood pressure. How can an emotion, which is totally related to brain, result in blood pressure changes?
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13 views

More vectors for inducing neurodegeneration (reduction in synaptic plasticity) in D.melanogaster

I've just finished a project on loss of synaptic plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster larvae with uas control gal4 sensor for cAMP expressed in the motor neurons. I induced neurodegeneration through ...
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2answers
56 views

Is there any research on how accurately people can follow a beat?

I'm currently helping develop a rhythm game, and as part of the scoring system, I'd like to make scores and ranks based more on accurate pattern recognition rather than hitting notes very exactly on ...
2
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1answer
48 views

What can myelination tell you about the evolution of sensory receptors?

I am reading Avi Chaudhuri's Fundamentals of Sensory Perception and wondering if the information given about the somatosensory system could tell us anything about the way it evolved. It seems (at ...
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1answer
29 views

Is Norepinephrine beta2 adrenomimetic?

I know that it has alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 effects. It has beta2 receptor where epinephrine can effect. However, to say that it is beta adrenomimetic, I am not sure. That is ligand binding beta2 ...
3
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1answer
44 views

Cross section of actin network in neurites

for a simulation I am developing I would like to know how the actin network in neurites is distributed. Is actin confined to the periphery or is the whole neurite shaft containing actin with a rather ...
10
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1answer
318 views

What are the “stars” we see after a bump on the head?

Sorry if this might appear funny. When I close my eyes for a longer time, and suddenly open it, I see some twinkling white small circles, and when i concentrate on anyone of them it disappears, as ...
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1answer
918 views

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous?

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous? We have two hands and we nearly can't use one and this seems like a weakness, and a stupid one when you first think about it. But ...
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2answers
129 views

Are brain cells replaced over time?

You know how your cells die all the time and new ones are made to replace them, so you practically have a new body every maybe 5 years? Many people say you become a completely different person every ...
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2answers
91 views

What are the physiological roles of Hydrogen sulfide?

I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds H2O + H2S ←→ ... Actually, I ...
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1answer
72 views

How small does a nanobot have to be to “swim through the brain” and access any neuron it wants to?

I read on this question What is in the space between neurons in a brain? that there is actually not much empty space in a brain. But my question is slightly different. Is there a visual demonstration ...
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1answer
28 views

Confusion over role of current/potential in Nervous system?

I am taking a course on the nervous system and I am do not have any physics background. Therefore, I would like to know, what are we precisely talking about when we talk about current in the nervous ...
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1answer
72 views

Do ants feel pain?

I have watched video on youtube where guy pours molten aluminium into fire ant colony to make casing. In the comments below there's huge discussion on is that a right thing to do. I am on the side ...
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0answers
26 views

Criteria for electrophysiological threshold

As opposed to action potential thresholds (which are yes/no events), electrophysiological thresholds of compound action potentials are arbitrary. Mostly a certain noise level is picked and when the ...
2
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1answer
32 views

What is the mechanism responsible for the 'delay' in delayed rectifier potassium channels?

I've been trying to find a comprehensive explanation concerning the nature of the 'delay' in neurons' delayed rectifier potassium channels. As it's written in my intro to neuroscience textbook, these ...
2
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1answer
89 views

A subtle test for color-blindness [closed]

Is there a test method of proving a person being color-blind, without letting the test subject know, that he/she is being tested? E.g. showing the person cards with colored dots like depicted here is ...
10
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1answer
148 views

How reversible is DAT upregulation from long-term ADHD medication use?

A mechanism for ADHD stimulant medication tolerance has now been found. See http://neurosciencenews.com/adhd-medication-patient-brains-adapt-dat/. Here's the thing though: what exactly is the ...
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5answers
253 views

Does a neuron ever generate an action potential without stimuli?

Most accounts I read involving action potentials and synapses and the like tend to focus mostly on the action potential as a mere automatic reaction to another similar event happening upstream. From ...
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2answers
79 views

Book recommended for neurobiology

I am looking for a good explanatory book concerning Neurobiology. I am interested on how the brain works but prior to this I believe that I have to start learning things about the biology of neurons. ...
5
votes
1answer
304 views

Why do antidepressants have a delayed onset of action?

Why do antidepressants take so long to reach efficacy? I've read of theories about it perhaps being due to the strength of negative feedback via serotonergic and adrenergic autoreceptors during the ...
4
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1answer
72 views

Mechanisms of extracellular stimulation of neurons

When stimulating a group of neurons with an electrode, let's say we put it in a region that contains axons, what is the mechanism by which the axons are stimulated? I've been told electrodes ...
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3answers
142 views

Which part of the brain needs to be shut down to lose conciousness?

Whether it is mechanical (trauma), chemical (anaesthesia) or electrical - which part of the brain is shut down to cause loss of consciousness?
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2answers
60 views

Is the Hypothalamus part of the Central Nervous System or Endocrine System

Sorry for a certainly naive question. Some references (for example https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/nsdivide.html) seem to to indicate that the hypothalamus is part of the Central Nervous ...
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3answers
77 views

Can connections between neurons be weakened?

Connections between neurons are said (by Wikipedia) to be strengthened as part of learning - can they also be weakened (below the original level)? I understand the concept of the connections ...
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4answers
95 views

Are neural connections one-way?

I'm trying to think about how two neurons communicate, typically shown in pictures as an electric pulse traveling along a long, thin connective tissue. Is this depiction somewhat accurate, and if so, ...
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1answer
779 views

Why Do Nerve Signals Get Crossed?

First off, I don't know if this is a normal healthy thing to occur. There have been many times where I have an itch on say my arm and I scratch it, only to feel the scratching elsewhere on my body. I ...
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1answer
25 views

What controls gut motility?

I have two different papers. One claims that gut motility is reduced by stimulation of the Opioid κ and δ receptors. The receptors are activated by Morphine and certain derivatives, specifically ...
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0answers
22 views

Gastroenteritis virus causing mutation of the Enterochromaffin cells

I am working on the solution to a worldwide problem: IBS or chronic diarrhea following a viral gastroenteritis infection. I think I have an answer. The only missing piece to the puzzle I found in a ...
5
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1answer
77 views

Can the negative afterimage appear only if there is light or is it possible in darkness?

Reading the following paragraph: After staring at the red and blue shamrock, you saw a green and yellow afterimage. Opponent-process theory proposes that as you stared at the red and blue ...
2
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1answer
146 views

What is the mechanism of reflex arcs?

When a reflex arc occurs the signal from the receptor passes straight to the motor neuron instead of being passed onto the brain. This is a rather simplistic explanation, I was hoping to make it more ...
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0answers
39 views

MRI with lots of white matter.

Why might an MRI show a large amount of white matter and a low amount of gray matter yet have a full skull with little shrinkage in an above average intelligence primate?
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0answers
58 views

Does the Jungian notion of collective unconsciousness have any legitimacy in the light of modern neurobiology and epigenetics?

Carl Jung has long ago proposed a rather controversial notion of collective unconsciousness [1, 2, 3], a form of the unconscious (that part of the mind containing memories and impulses of which ...
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1answer
23 views

How isolated are different areas of the brain?

I'm interested in understanding how isolated different parts of the brain are from each-other. I'm trying to understand the way that different sections of the brain work together. More specifically, ...
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1answer
120 views

How does the brain avoid feedback loops?

The article Ants Swarm Like Brains Think really helped me to understand the way that neurons which are pretty dumb on their own (like ants) can work together to create a pretty genius system (a brain ...
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1answer
23 views

Is the brain functionally symmetrical?

I understand that each half of the human brain handles different parts of our thinking. Left brain, right brain, that whole topic. But in pictures, the brain is always depicted as having symmetrical ...
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1answer
39 views

What is the advantage to neurons being asymmetrical?

Does having a central axon and dendrites result in any advantage compared to if the neuron was symmetrical?
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1answer
257 views

Neurons with thousands of connections: where are the extra connections coming from?

If every neuron has only one Axon but can can have thousands of (or let's say, even just ten) incoming Axon connections via its dendrites, where are the extra connections coming from? It seems to ...
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1answer
70 views

Can the sensory neuron network and the motor neuron network be considered separate networks?

I am reading up on the nervous system using wikipedia and trying to interpret one infographic on this page: I've always thought of the human nervous system as a singular network of neurons. This ...
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1answer
88 views

What is the mechanism responsible for the periodicity of hiccups?

Hiccups (singultus) are caused by involuntary spasm of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm, producing a sudden inspiration with associated glottic closure. It seems the neurobiology of the reflex ...
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1k views
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2answers
2k views

Why do neurons have only one axon?

I have just learnt about neurons. I wonder why neurons have only one axon. Can they transmit nerve impulses faster and more rapidly when they have more axons? Does having more axons help in ...
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2answers
229 views

How long does a signal from the brain take to reach the limbs?

If the brain sends a signal to move what's the time it takes the signal to travel via neurons to motor neurons in hands, arms and legs? How fast do those signals travel?
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1answer
31 views

Neuroscience: zapping an axon connected to thermoreceptor

Let’s say an experimenter has an electrode that can give a shock to a single axon. She takes that electrode and zaps an axon connected to thermoreceptors in the hand of her subject. I) What would the ...
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2answers
70 views

Can you disconnect sensation from the brain without destroying muscle functions?

I want to know if it would be possible for a surgeon to "shut off" a person's senses without causing paralysis of any kind. The person would have to maintain their ability to speak and move, but not ...
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0answers
43 views

Biology Experiment Data (Hodgkin-Huxley)

I'm doing research into the Hodgkin-Huxley Model from an electronics/mathematics perspective and I'm looking to find actual numerical results from experiments on squid axons. I want to compare the ...
2
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1answer
72 views

Does Spinning dancer has anything to do with your eyesight

I came across the spinning dancer as part of the brain test to determine left brain vs right brain dominance. I saw the dancer is turning clockwise. The other people around me saw it turning ...
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1answer
2k views

What do you see when your eyes are closed?

If you are in pitch black and you close your eyes, you sometimes can see strange shapes of various colors. A lot of the time these shapes and colors change as you observe them. This phenomenon still ...
3
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1answer
45 views

How can I determine the purity of cells isolated from rat brains if I cannot use FACS, Immunohistochemistry or SEM anaysis?

Please help. I know how to isolate the different cells (astrocytes, other glial cells, neurons and synaptosomes) from brain tissue using a Ficoll-based separation but how do I determine the purity of ...