The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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Spinal cord injury bypass

When the spinal cord is damaged, the connection between the brain and some part of the body may be lost. To restore this connection, some research are carried out, with mainly two different goals : ...
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257 views

How is propagation of action potentials terminated once the “message” has been sent/received?

I'm thinking about neurons in the brain that are used for "thinking". As I read about action potentials, I see that an Axon is connected to a Dendrite of a neighboring cell and that there are ...
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138 views

What causes Paresthesia (Pins and Needles) at a cellular level?

I've looked it up in plenty of places like the Wikipedia page and such, and it is clear that the most common cause of Paresthesia is either a fair amount of pressure on a specific patch of skin ...
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260 views

Do brain cells shrink during REM sleep or a lucid dream?

In this BBC news article a study shows that during sleep brain cells shrink to open up the gaps between neurons and allow fluid to wash the brain clean. But do the cells shrink and undergo the whole ...
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1answer
102 views

What is the full name of E. G. Gray?

E. G. Gray is Neuro scientist who found and described first the two major morphologically defined synapse types (Gray Type I (asymmetric) and II (symmetric)) in his work E G Gray (Oct. 1959). ...
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spinal cord lesion and result in somatic sensation

Jimbo suffers a lesion to the entire right half of the spinal cord at the T6 level. A few weeks after his injury, his doctor tests his right and left legs for somatic sensation and tone. fill out her ...
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23 views

Neuroscience: zapping an axon connected to thermoreceptor

Let’s say an experimenter has an electrode that can give a shock to a single axon. She takes that electrode and zaps an axon connected to thermoreceptors in the hand of her subject. I) What would the ...
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1answer
46 views

Do's and Don't's of Undergraduate Research? [closed]

I was fortunate enough to get a position as a researcher for the Mayo Clinic's SURF Program this year. My PI's lab focus is on the the immune system's role in CNS axonal and neuronal injury, ...
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1answer
61 views

What is the creature with the lowest neuron count that demonstrates cognition beyond reflexes?

I'm under the impression that nematode worms just perform the same scripted actions over and over again in response to specific stimuli. They have 302 neurons. Chimpanzees display problem solving ...
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1answer
101 views

Benefits of CLARITY?

What are the benefits of CLARITY over this technique that was published more than a year earlier? Of course the second technique needs a fancier microscope that is likely more expensive and requires ...
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44 views

Is there a scientific name for the field of study focusing on the hemispheres of the brain and their control of opposite sides of the body?

I'm assuming this field of study would focus on motor controls, movement, and exercise, but it could also focus on activities which strengthen the corpus callosum or stimulate a specific half of the ...
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56 views

M-type potassium channels by muscarinic receptors

How does the closure of M-type potassium channels by muscarinic receptors result in increased excitation of the target neuron?
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69 views

Systemic sensory confusion?

Sometimes when a person gets touched on one part of the body they feel it else where and may think it came from a different part of the body. What causes this? Other examples are similar to why you ...
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2answers
176 views

How does the brain know where a signal came from? What is the addressing system

I am an electronic engineer so I am thinking about this from an electronics outlook. How does the addressing system work, As I see it, the nervous system is small parallel branches attached to larger ...
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2answers
114 views

Chills down the spine with certain music?

I am sure many of us know the feeling of that tingling chill down our spines when listening to certain music. I experienced this most when my younger brother played an emotional piano piece for a ...
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1answer
48 views

How do neurons send electric pulses even though they are surrounded by liquid which is mostly water?

I just thought about the fact that people move through electrical pulses traveling through neurons in the brain and muscles through the body. Here is what i know: the body is full of 97 or more, ...
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1answer
109 views

Does playing music during sleep actually suppress rather than rouse the brain?

I've long been interested in the effect of music/sound on dreaming, and even built 2 apps that play music during REM period. Now I'm looking at this article about FMRI studies of a sleeping brain, and ...
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1answer
69 views

Evolution, self organization and neuroscience

I have rudimentary knowledge of evolution, and biology in general, so bear with me if this question is a bit naive. Let's say we have a particular trait, like highly sensitive peripheral vision. ...
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2answers
99 views

Do humans have a “dominant” neurotransmitter system/sensitivity within their brain?

I've recently heard a podcast, in which Dr. Helen Fisher suggests that there are "4 broad personality types", and each one is associated with a particular neurotransmitter: The corresponding ...
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1answer
218 views

Action potential and sodium channels

In this video on electro tonic potential, the tutor says that when the potassium channels open the potential drops from +40mV to -80mV, where the sodium channels have already closed at +40mV. Now in ...
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1answer
57 views

How good is information transfer between the hemispheres of the brain?

I sometimes listen to lectures on my phone using ear buds, but occasionally with only one ear bud in. Is the other half of my brain losing out on any aspect of the lecture? Just how good is the corpus ...
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40 views

Are there baby drinks closer to breast-milk?

Many women cannot or will not feed their children with breast-milk. It is my understanding breast-milk has many advantages over formula. Some psychological like oxytocin and some physiological like ...
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1answer
39 views

What are the molecular mechanisms that make the turtle brain more resistant to hypoxia?

I know that turtle brains, particularly those of individual species that hibernate and burrow are particularly resilient to hypoxia and any tissue damage secondary to a hypoxic event. What are the ...
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37 views

What percentage of possible proteins has been tested by human brain evolution?

When the human human brain is discussed, I frequently hear an argument that goes like this "If there was a simple chemical solution for people to be smarter, nature would've already found it". I'm ...
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1answer
57 views

Can cerebrospinal fluid deliver nutrients/drugs to neurons during sleep?

I'm looking at this article on the possible mechanism of detoxifying brain during sleep using cerebrospinal fluid. It states that at night, the space between neurons may allow better (up to 20x) ...
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25 views

Systematic anticoagulant injection after a CVA

Since most of the cerebrovascular accident are ischemic ones, would it be usefull to have anticoagulant everywhere (we already have AEDs everywhere) so that everytime someone would have symptoms of a ...
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115 views

The process of how you visually perceive objects?

Use the following terms to describe in detail how you visually perceive an object that you can see right now. Use the terms in order to correctly describe the sequence of events involved in your ...
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1answer
248 views

Why apes started to contemplate and become altruistic? [closed]

I was asking this first on philosophy forums, but it is suggested, that answer could be found from evolutionary view of point, so here we go: Again my question raised when thinking of myths, their ...
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Human perception of time depending on age

From what I can tell and what thus far all people with whom I discussed this subject confirmed is that time appears to "accelerate" as we age. Digging a little, most explanations I found basically ...
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Neuroendocrinal mechanism of parturition

My book reads, "The fetus signals that it is mature by secreting certain hormones that diffuse across the placenta into mother's blood and cause the secretion of oxytocin from her posterior ...
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0answers
119 views

Saltatory Conduction Of Nerve Impulses

I am aware about some basics of Saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. I know that the nerve impulses(ionic flow and the depolarization) are transferred from the node to the node in myelinated nerve ...
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1answer
51 views

Do local field potentials (LFP) create waves on the surfaces of nerve cells?

Are waves created by the LFP on the surfaces of neurons cell bodies? Since the cells have a resting potential, do these waves create harmonic oscillation of the membranes at particular frequencies? ...
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21 views

What features cause mechano sensory adaptation?

In relation to mechanoreceptors (e.g. pacinian corpuscles), what stops a constant stimulus from producing action potentials? I understand that adaption is used to filter out stimuli that aren't ...
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1answer
286 views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
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How is membrane capacitance related to the increased speed of saltatory conduction?

Here is the original question which inspired my question below. As explained by the answers there, the reason saltatory conduction in myelinated neurons is faster than non-myelinated conduction is ...
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144 views

Which Receptors are Involved in the antidepressant effects of SSRIs?

From what I've read the major receptor subtypes involved in the antidepressant effects of SSRIs are: 5-HT1A 5-HT2C 5-HT3 5-HT6 Please cite journal articles to back up your claims, I don't want any ...
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22 views

Stress regulation in mosquitoes

I was just trying to understand how in insects, specifically mosquitoes does the process of emergency responding, stress regulation take place? Or in simpler words how are flight, fright and fight ...
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1answer
155 views

Are inflammation and anxiety connected?

I've been reading a curious paper about the use of cannabis, and one of the passages piqued my interest: There’s also been a lot of work done on another constituent of marijuana, cannabinoid, ...
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1answer
55 views

Missing cells from immunopanning

Why do I not have any cells left in my positive panning plate after transferring from the negative panning plate during immunopanning? I am trying to purify retinal ganglion cells from postnatal rats ...
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2answers
5k views

What are the functions and differences between axons and dendrites?

My textbook doesn't do a very good job of pointing out what the differences between the two are. It basically mentions axons only in the same breath as the synapse (that synapses are the endings/tips ...
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2answers
89 views

Epinephrine vs. Adrenaline

Both names are widely used, with what appears to me as a slight prevalence of “epinephrine” in scientific literature and an overwhelming prevalence of “adrenaline” in popular media. Are there any ...
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0answers
64 views

Organisms with the most extreme sensory capabilities? (sight, smell, sound) [closed]

Background It is quite mind boggling to imagine what it would be like to be missing sight, sound, touch, smell, taste etc. Question Which organism holds the record for most extreme sensory ...
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1answer
173 views

Is there a maximum pain threshold?

Is there a maximum threshold of pain a Human can experience, beyond which point there is no noticeable difference? I ask this question in part to better understand the definition of pain and its ...
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2answers
1k views

Do neurons secrete multiple neurotransmitters, or just one type?

I know that neurons communicate between each other by filling the junction between dendrites with neurotransmitters. What interests me is if a single neuron only works with one type of ...
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1answer
183 views

Are there any types of cancer that cause neurons to divide?

After birth neurons generally do not divide. But is there any specific type of rare cancer or tumour where neurons divide? And if there is such a cancer, then how is it possible for a neuron to regain ...
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4answers
7k views

How does the brain's energy consumption depend on mental activity?

What is the impact of mental activity on the energy consumption of the human brain? I am most interested in intellectually demanding tasks (e.g., chess matches, solving a puzzle, taking a difficult ...
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0answers
58 views

The Operation of tuning in the S1 layer of ventral model

According to my previous question in ventral Stream pathway and architecture, I want now to get a brief example about how the S1 layer is constructed. In other words, how all the simple units are ...
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1answer
67 views

What will happen if we expose the brain to an intermittent light?

If a brain is exposed to an intermittent light are specific areas going to fire? If yes, which of them? Is there any experiment about this?
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0answers
70 views

Why are there different types of neurotransmitters?

Why does the type of neurotransmitter matter? If the neurotransmitter just stimulates a dendrite on a neuron which causes electricity to move through via sodium-pottasium pumps and ion gates to ...
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1answer
66 views

What in neurons and their connections changes during the process of learning?

I'm not sure if this question belongs more in physics or biology (or maybe even computer science)... but biology seemed to fit more. What changes in the state of our brains when we learn things? ...