The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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26 views

Why is the autonomic nervous system divided into parts? [closed]

Why would it be advantageous from an evolutionary perspective to develop parasympathetic and sympathetic systems?
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57 views

What is the reason for fear induced defecation?

I started to handle mice for my job and noticed that they tend to defecate and/or urinate when they are scared. The fear is induced by me, because I need a long time (due to inexperience) to grab the ...
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7answers
6k views

Why can't we see in low light if staring long enough?

For me it seems reasonable that if I kept my gaze on a fixed point in a room with low light, a progressively brighter and better picture would appear before my eyes, just like a camera can see in the ...
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2answers
77 views

How does the mechanism which controls blood pressure in the brain work? [closed]

I've heard that the blood pressure in the brain is organised by a special mechanism. What is that and how does it work?
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1answer
105 views

Synaptic pruning and selective elimination during adolescence

How does Synaptic pruning occur during pre-adolescence, adolescence and post-adolescence, after there is blooming overproduction of synaptic connections until the years of late childhood, and how does ...
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1answer
95 views

What is the role of the tissue surrounding neurons in decision making and taking control of impulses?

How does the fatty tissue surrounding neurons supports and enhances the speed of electrical impulses? How does it stabilize connections that take control of impulses and decision-making? The cells ...
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1answer
41 views

What kind of changes “stays” in the neuron after the nervous impulse happened?

I often see in neuroscience textbooks about how the brain controls everything in the body with different tracts and etc, and it seems that information is always being transmitted, like there's no ...
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2answers
57 views

Is there a way to know how many sodium channels are active (conducting) at a given time in the brain?

I was doing some reading about anti-epileptic sodium channel blockers, then wondered how many sodium channels are actually conducting (actively passing ions) at any given time, that is, in an "average,...
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1answer
111 views

How does the brain manifest and realize the intention to resist sleep?

The question title says it all. What happens in my brain when I resist sleep? I would appreciate explanations on neurotransmitter changes, what areas of the brain activate to resist sleep, what can an ...
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1answer
69 views

What determines the shape of the center-surround receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells?

The wikipedia article about receptive fields of visual system tells us the following: The receptive field is often identified as the region of the retina where the action of light alters the ...
4
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1answer
117 views

All-or-nothing-law: law or general principle?

The all-or-nothing principle indicates that a nerve cell fires at maximum potential or not at all, based on a threshold on the stimulus. Is this a statement which is always true, or only mostly-...
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1answer
258 views

Are 2 eyes necessary for 3D vision?

To start off: I'm not a biology student, but a computer science major It has always been my understanding that humans have 2 eyes so that we can have 3D vision: the left eye see more of the left side ...
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1answer
61 views

How difficult is it to make a shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in humans?

There have been various research projects that experimented with shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to specifically silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in small animals like rats & guinea pigs. (...
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1answer
60 views

Nernst equation?

I keep seeing the Nernst equation in two different forms, one using the natural log and the other using log base 10. Could someone explain why there are two different versions, and which should be ...
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1answer
45 views

What is 'noise'?

In both my psychology, biology and neuroscience classes, professors are constantly talking about 'noise'. For instance, our perception is limited due to 'sensory noise' in our neurons. I am utterly ...
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0answers
46 views

How do Binaural Beats Work?

We have a project on different ways of relaxation. One way I found out was binaural beats. Could anyone please tell me how they work. You guys are masters when it comes to simplifying things! All I ...
4
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1answer
84 views

Relationship between toxicity of drugs and negative effects on brain

Are psychoactive drugs with lower lethal doses more neurotoxic (more damaging to the brain)? For example, tetrahydrocannabinol (one of the active components of cannabis) has a much higher lethal dose ...
4
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1answer
51 views

Is HSV-vector-mediated miRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia stable?

My question is on the following article: "Reduction of voltage gated sodium channel protein in DRG by vector mediated miRNA reduces pain in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy" My question is, do ...
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1answer
59 views

Why is stimulation of nerve tissue with a negative pulse called “cathodic” stimulation?

By definition, the cathode is defined as the terminal through which current exits a polarized device. But in the context of neuromodulation, such as spinal cord stimulation, deep brain stimulation, ...
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2answers
466 views

Is the Hypothalamus part of the Central Nervous System or Endocrine System

Sorry for a certainly naive question. Some references (for example https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/nsdivide.html) seem to to indicate that the hypothalamus is part of the Central Nervous ...
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0answers
27 views

Is there any evidence to suggest that exercise reduces the side effects of caffeine?

I heard a friend say: I'm not drinking coffee this week. My body can only process the caffeine if I run at least 15km a week. I found this claim fascinating - that exercise temporarily ...
3
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1answer
40 views

How are individual neuron firing rates characterized?

I'm reading this paper that the Human Brain Project published in Cell and I'm confused how they recorded the firing rates shown in the firing below: In the publication, they mention that they use ...
8
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1answer
131 views

Soma-soma paired neurons

I'm reading this paper about how neurons can connect. Wikipedia says, typically neurons connect via axon (transmitter) and dendrites (receiver) but there are also special cases where dendrites connect ...
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2answers
7k views

Why is saltatory conduction faster than continuous conduction?

How does spacing apart sodium and potassium channels allow the action potential to travel faster down the axon? This is the reason always cited for saltatory conduction and myelination, but my mental ...
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56 views

How does a real brain actually learn? [closed]

In biology class we've learned that neurons are connected. If two or more neurons interact with each other often, then the connection gets stronger and stronger, and new connections may form. But if a ...
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21 views

How are targets formed for axon growth cones (CNS)?

Axons have growth cones which find a route to their target using multiple methods (guidepost cells, attraction to target, etc...). My question is, what is the process that actually forms the target? ...
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2answers
316 views

Why do we like music?

Music is, of course, just a sequence of sounds. Sounds are vibrations in the air, which our ears detect. So why do we find certain sequences of sounds to be appealing? What makes us want to hear these ...
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1answer
129 views

Are CN3, CN7, CN9 and CN10 the only Parasympathetic Cranial Nerves?

It has been my thought for a long time that this is the case, but I am unsure currently, since the parasympathetic tract of colon sigmoideum does not seem to have connection with CN 10. It connects ...
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1answer
659 views

Why do humans alone have the capability to have religious/spiritual experiences?

What is it in our brain that makes having such experiences possible? I assume other species don't have these. Sure there are instances in the natural world where you can see individuals of the species ...
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2answers
82 views

How can neuronal signals faithfully be reproduced by scalp electrodes?

There is a skull barrier (and possibly other layers too) between the brain and the scalp. I have seen people trying to extract EEG signals from the scalp by connecting electrodes and interface it to ...
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0answers
27 views

Synapse formation [closed]

I am trying to learn about neuronal synapse formation, but the literature is intimidating to someone with little background knowledge. I am interested in synapse formation in both human adults as ...
35
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2answers
2k views

Can brain cells move?

I was discussing this with my brother. I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that they can move. Thanks EDIT: By movement I mean long distance migration (preferably within the brain only).
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1answer
31 views

Does the number of nodes determines the rate at which a neural signal is transmitted?

I know that the the bigger the neuron's diameter is, the faster the neuron signal is transmitted. This makes sense according to the proportionality of resistance to the inverse of area and thus, in ...
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1answer
236 views

How are reflexes suppressed?

What neurophysiological process keeps reflex arcs in check? For example, the withdrawal reflex causes the hand to jerk back when the fingers touch something painfully hot incidentally. However, that ...
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1answer
72 views

Reseach on feeling pain of other people

I'm more of a tech than bio kind of guy, but I have read and learned a lot alongside of my girlfriend's education. Which is very interesting!! Currently I want to investigate : people claiming to ...
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1answer
59 views

Is this “Sympathetic fight response” axis accurate?

Peripheral sensory cell > Preganglionic cell > Dorsal root ganglia cell in the ''Sympathetic chain'' > Ventral root ganglia cell in the ''sympathetic chain'' > Post-ganglionic cell that activates an ...
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1answer
62 views

Does neural network in brain form cycles?

In other words is it possible for dendrite of neuron A to be connected with axon of neuron B and at the same time dendrite of neuron B to be connections with axon of neuron A (or similarly for any ...
7
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1answer
115 views

What were the first neural systems like?

I'm curious about the origin of the neural network. I'm thinking perhaps once life evolved beyond the single cell organism, it needed a simple neural network to coordinate those cells, and cell ...
7
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1answer
7k views

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous?

Most of us have one dominant hand. We find it nigh on impossible to do very delicate or dextrous activities with our other-hand. This seems like an apparent weakness, and a rather odd one when you ...
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1answer
157 views

What is the speed of neurotransmitter release and receptor binding in a neuronal synapse?

Obviously neural signals travel at extremely high speeds, but I'm wondering how much that speed is affected by the release and binding time of neurotransmitters. If my sources are correct, a well ...
2
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1answer
49 views

I know how to solve these equations, but I'm not sure what t' represents?

I am investigating the Wilson Cowan neuron population model, and I can follow most of it, but I'm not sure what is meant by t' in the equation for proportion of neurons in the refractory period. The ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Dreaming after passing out

I'll have few questions about passing out and dreaming. English is not my native language, and my biology knowledge is very limited. So bear with me. What exactly is blackout? (in a really simple ...
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1answer
306 views

Why do nerve cells convert electric signals to chemical signals?

One would assume that a faster response time in the nervous system would be beneficial. However, nerve cells have to convert electrical impulses to chemical signals and cross a synapse. Why didn't ...
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2answers
158 views

Is there a difference between visual sensation and imagination in the brain?

How substantial is the difference between the neural signal associated with seeing an image and the imagination of that image? Surely, it can not entirely copy the pathway from the sensory organs to ...
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1answer
167 views

How does the brain recall information?

In computers, finding a single word is realized through serial attempts across all available connections to find a specified target. How does the brain solve this? How does the whole process, from ...
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1answer
36 views

What effect is seen when the extracellular concentration of sodium is increased? [closed]

I can't seem to figure out how this would effect the cell since sodium is not very permeable.
0
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1answer
125 views

How are neural networks encoded in the DNA? [closed]

The central nervous systems as well as the brain->muscles and sensory cells->brain nervous pathways, need to be precisely wired for life to be possible. Moreover they are wired almost exactly the same ...
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2answers
259 views

At what point during an action potential are the sodium potassium pumps working?

I'm trying to understand how all of the potentials during an action potential are created. My question specifically is about the sodium potassium pumps, however I would also be grateful if someone ...
6
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2answers
212 views

Can axons act as receptors?

In all histology books, it is stated that all sensory nerve endings (receptors) consist of dendrites that translate physical stimuli from the environment into neural signals. However, several sensory ...
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1answer
4k views

Serotonin - Does being aroused make you sleepy?

My Psychology text book says Serotonin causes "Sleep, arousal levels and emotion" Does this really mean that when you are being aroused, Serotonin is released, which in turn makes you sleepy? If so, ...