The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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155 views

Is there a maximum pain threshold?

Is there a maximum threshold of pain a Human can experience, beyond which point there is no noticeable difference? I ask this question in part to better understand the definition of pain and its ...
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1answer
266 views

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous?

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous? We have two hands and we nearly can't use one and this seems like a weakness, and a stupid one when you first think about it. But ...
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64 views

What will happen if we expose the brain to an intermittent light?

If a brain is exposed to an intermittent light are specific areas going to fire? If yes, which of them? Is there any experiment about this?
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67 views

Why are there different types of neurotransmitters?

Why does the type of neurotransmitter matter? If the neurotransmitter just stimulates a dendrite on a neuron which causes electricity to move through via sodium-pottasium pumps and ion gates to ...
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1answer
63 views

What happens during a Raynauds episode?

Raynaud's phenomenon can be a serious health issue, as the blood flow to the extremities, mainly the fingers is compromised, causing fingers to blanche, and then turn blue. Severe Raynaud's can cause ...
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1answer
64 views

What in neurons and their connections changes during the process of learning?

I'm not sure if this question belongs more in physics or biology (or maybe even computer science)... but biology seemed to fit more. What changes in the state of our brains when we learn things? ...
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1answer
60 views

Radial Basis Function Network (RBF Network)

In the Wikipedia article on radial basis function network, I didn't understand what was meant by "center vector for neuron i", in other words "center of the RBF units called also prototype".
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1answer
247 views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
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172 views

Are there any types of cancer that cause neurons to divide?

After birth neurons generally do not divide. But is there any specific type of rare cancer or tumour where neurons divide? And if there is such a cancer, then how is it possible for a neuron to regain ...
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43 views

Nocioception (pain perception) in subcutaneous tissue

There seem to be no nocioceptors (pain and temperature sensitive nerve endings) in subcutaneous fat. there are nocioceptors and other receptors in veins running through fat, but these can be avoided. ...
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83 views

Learning first-year biology + anatomy via documentary? [closed]

Probably going to take first-year biology in ~4 months; so was thinking to go through MIT's 7.00x on EdX… However seeing at how popular this topic is, I was thinking there might be a fun documentary ...
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58 views

The Operation of tuning in the S1 layer of ventral model

According to my previous question in ventral Stream pathway and architecture, I want now to get a brief example about how the S1 layer is constructed. In other words, how all the simple units are ...
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172 views

Ventral stream pathway and architecture proposed by Poggio's group

Please can you give me a very brief explanation about all functions in the ventral stream architecture summarized in this figure: This figure is from Serre et al.'s A quantitative theory of ...
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74 views

Unexplained pain in the legs at night, possibly due to peripheral nerves - diagnosis and cure? [closed]

I have seen a few instances where people suffer from tremendous pain the legs, often around the region of ankle, going a bit down and stretching up to knee. This happens most prominently at the night ...
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2answers
249 views

Do brain cells shrink during REM sleep or a lucid dream?

In this BBC news article a study shows that during sleep brain cells shrink to open up the gaps between neurons and allow fluid to wash the brain clean. But do the cells shrink and undergo the whole ...
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0answers
22 views

How is saltatory conduction faster than conduction of unmyelinated fibers? [duplicate]

It's always the same explanation that currents are able to "hop" along Ranvier nodes instead of passing continuously along the axon making saltatory conduction more efficient than continuous ...
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1answer
39 views

What are the molecular mechanisms that make the turtle brain more resistant to hypoxia?

I know that turtle brains, particularly those of individual species that hibernate and burrow are particularly resilient to hypoxia and any tissue damage secondary to a hypoxic event. What are the ...
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1answer
97 views

What is the full name of E. G. Gray?

E. G. Gray is Neuro scientist who found and described first the two major morphologically defined synapse types (Gray Type I (asymmetric) and II (symmetric)) in his work E G Gray (Oct. 1959). ...
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1answer
124 views

What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain

As far as i know when you accept cocaine in your blood some cocaine molecules reach some synapses in your brain and fill some Reuptake tunnels preventing the cell to simply "do not know that fired ...
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1answer
185 views

What happens in your brain when you receive information which causes you to bristle?

I'm talking about moments when you watch a film and you bristle, or when you listen to music, etc. What kind of neurotransmitter flow changes?
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1answer
52 views

Number of MHCs in neurons

I have read that neurons have proportionately less MHC molecules than other cells of the body. What is the advantage of this?
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2answers
89 views

Which part of the brain needs to be shut down to lose conciousness?

Whether it is mechanical (trauma), chemical (anaesthesia) or electrical - which part of the brain is shut down to cause loss of consciousness?
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1answer
144 views

L1 - L5 layers of the brain

I have read in some papers about the layers L1-L5 of the brain (e.g. in this paper). I could not find a definition of these layers. I have found information about the layers V1-V5 in the visual ...
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1answer
49 views

Does sympathetic nervous system acts bilaterally for pupil dilation or other two sided organs?

The question might seem weird. Does sympathetic nervous system acts 'bilaterally' meaning if you shout to a person's left ear a loud noise (e.g. by headphones), will it activate sympathetic system ...
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3answers
165 views

Mechanical cause of loss of consciousness

Consciousness is an electrical and chemical interaction in the brain, caused by neurons firing and chemical interactions. How does a mechanical "force" cause this to stop working? i.e. How does a ...
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1answer
181 views

What is 'calcium conductance'?

What is the meaning of calcium conductance in ion channels. I encountered this in the following text: It was established that the µ and δ opioid receptors open potassium channels, which results ...
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3answers
126 views

Why are things conscious?

I've been referred to here from http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/8052/why-are-things-conscious. Could you guys help out? Here's the question: What is the reason for animals or more ...
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29 views

What Role Antagonists Play in the Study of Drugs?

I am pretty unfamiliar to pharmacology. I'm doing a research on drug abuse, particularly opioids' mechanism of action. I encountered several times evidences that come from studies using antagonists ...