The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

3
votes
2answers
149 views

Could an action potential produce few or more neurotransmitters based on the stimulus received?

I reckon that if you would be able to widen the AP width, it would produce more neurotransmitters in that larger time interval. Is that correct? Or does the neuron have a standard amount of ...
3
votes
1answer
278 views

Where do butterflies sleep?

Do butterflies (insects) sleep, and if so, where?? I have googled for information but didn't get an exact answer.
3
votes
3answers
158 views

Membrane potential after exposure to glutamate

Neurons were kept in a physiological solution. During the resting phase, the membrane potential in the axoplasm of neurons was negative compared to the extracellular space and a potential ...
3
votes
2answers
140 views

What are the factors that control the speed of propagation of neuronal signals?

If we consider an analogy between a wire and a neuron there may be some resemblance between the factors controlling the data flow rate. For example the increased width of wire leads to decreased ...
3
votes
2answers
156 views

How is information sent from limbs to the brain exactly?

Say you have a needle, and you poke a very specific area on your left thumb. A signal gets sent from that nerve up your spine and into your brain. How does the brain know exactly where this signal ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

Biological advantage of electric synapses

Electric synapses are synapses that do not process information but simply foward one action potential from one neuron to the next. There are no neurotransmitters, no inhibitory and exitatory ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Neuromediator, Neuromodulator, Neurotransmitter?

Of these three words, perhaps Neurotransmitter is the most obvious. I took a look at Wikipedia page for Neuromodulation and found that this is pretty similar to Neurotransmitter too. I guess ...
3
votes
3answers
292 views

What exactly is the neural receptive field?

Neural receptive fields map the spatial or temporal distribution of the data to individual neuron excitation, if I understand correctly, but I do not understand if receptive fields (especially in the ...
3
votes
1answer
45 views

How does a microelectrode work?

On Wikipedia, the entire microelectrode page states only the following: A microelectrode is an electrode of very small size, used in electrophysiology for either recording of neural signals or ...
3
votes
2answers
53 views

Hydrophobia Outside of Rabies?

RELATED: Why does rabies cause hydrophobia? Agony, Hydrophobia and viruses in the light of evolutionary principles Has hydrophobia been found outside of rabies? I have only seen it ...
3
votes
3answers
213 views

Do skull bones have pain nerves (nociceptors)?

I recently attended an awake brain surgery for deep brain stimulation and it seemed to me that only the skin surrounding the drilled hole got local anaesthesia. I know that the brain itself does not ...
3
votes
2answers
117 views

What are the physiological roles of Hydrogen sulfide?

I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds H2O + H2S ←→ ... Actually, I ...
3
votes
1answer
226 views

Benefits of CLARITY?

What are the benefits of CLARITY over this technique that was published more than a year earlier? Of course the second technique needs a fancier microscope that is likely more expensive and requires ...
3
votes
3answers
82 views

Can 'hardware' thermalization explain memory decay?

Often we are able to memorize very precise bits of information (exact addresses, birthdays of inlaws, number of dirty socks under the bed), but over time our recollection tends to become fuzzy. We no ...
3
votes
1answer
305 views

Is there a maximum pain threshold?

Is there a maximum threshold of pain a Human can experience, beyond which point there is no noticeable difference? I ask this question in part to better understand the definition of pain and its ...
3
votes
2answers
227 views

What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain

As far as i know when you accept cocaine in your blood some cocaine molecules reach some synapses in your brain and fill some Reuptake tunnels preventing the cell to simply "do not know that fired ...
3
votes
1answer
199 views

Neuroscience of temperature regulation and perception

The hypothalamus is known to be important in the regulation of body temperature, but I'm curious whether anyone knows about the neurocircuitry of perceived temperature. It seems like there could be a ...
3
votes
1answer
98 views

What triggers creative thought in humans?

Creativity, innovation and ideation. Is there something in the brain that makes the brain think that way, as opposed to "normal baseline". What triggers creative thought in humans?
3
votes
1answer
2k views

SPINAL CORD: Do the axons from white matter synapse with the cell bodies in grey matter?

After wading through a sea of information, I understand the main differences between the white matter and grey matter of the spinal cord. I know that white matter contains myelinated axons in the ...
3
votes
1answer
36 views

Mechanism behind negative conductance of ion-channels

I am struggling to understand negative conductance shown on I-V curves on ion channels. Mechanistically negative conductance means that inward (or outward) current increases when voltage across ...
3
votes
1answer
28 views

Safe parameters for external nerve stimulation using electrical impulses

Introduction I've recently stumbled upon David Eagleman's TED talk on the concept of sensory substitution and addition. Being the most inspiring thing I've seen on the internet for the last few ...
3
votes
1answer
30 views

What is an auditory upward sweep?

I was reading an article in nature communications, when I came across this sentence: "The ‘match’ rule was indicated by either a blue circle or a auditory upward sweep".So I tried googling what was an ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

Is the Hypothalamus part of the Central Nervous System or Endocrine System

Sorry for a certainly naive question. Some references (for example https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/nsdivide.html) seem to to indicate that the hypothalamus is part of the Central Nervous ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

How can I determine the purity of cells isolated from rat brains if I cannot use FACS, Immunohistochemistry or SEM anaysis?

Please help. I know how to isolate the different cells (astrocytes, other glial cells, neurons and synaptosomes) from brain tissue using a Ficoll-based separation but how do I determine the purity of ...
3
votes
2answers
56 views

Is there any research on how accurately people can follow a beat?

I'm currently helping develop a rhythm game, and as part of the scoring system, I'd like to make scores and ranks based more on accurate pattern recognition rather than hitting notes very exactly on ...
3
votes
1answer
49 views

What is meant by drug tolerance?

What is meant by drug tolerance? This question is in my biology textbook for IGCSE and I have no idea what drug tolerance is. It would be very helpful if someone could clarify. Thank you.
3
votes
1answer
56 views

spinal cord lesion and result in somatic sensation

Jimbo suffers a lesion to the entire right half of the spinal cord at the T6 level. A few weeks after his injury, his doctor tests his right and left legs for somatic sensation and tone. fill out her ...
3
votes
1answer
249 views

Will neurons live after the death of a human? If so, how long?

I don't know if this is correct or not, but I have heard this from a friend and I want to get a clear explanation about this.I hope there is some one who can help me.
3
votes
1answer
228 views

Ventral stream pathway and architecture proposed by Poggio's group

Please can you give me a very brief explanation about all functions in the ventral stream architecture summarized in this figure: This figure is from Serre et al.'s A quantitative theory of ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Number of MHCs in neurons

I have read that neurons have proportionately less MHC molecules than other cells of the body. What is the advantage of this?
3
votes
1answer
707 views

Optogenetics - How do microbial opsins work?

I'm just introduced to the optogenetics method and am having some trouble grasping the genetics (of the optogenteics) part of things. So we have Retinal and Opsin that form Rhodopsin molecule that ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “tonic activity” common for neurons firing in the brain?

I've been reading about Dorsal Raphe Nucleus, a serotonin- rich part of the brain. I noticed mentioning of "tonic activity" - regular pulsing that releases neurotransmitters. On top of this "tone" the ...
3
votes
3answers
351 views

How is propagation of action potentials terminated once the “message” has been sent/received?

I'm thinking about neurons in the brain that are used for "thinking". As I read about action potentials, I see that an Axon is connected to a Dendrite of a neighboring cell and that there are ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Text/resource with information on all skeletal muscles and their motor units

Something analogous to an encyclopedia on baseball players with a list of all thier stats would be ideal. I'm not looking for just generic muscle names, locations and illustrations. Good answers ...
3
votes
2answers
276 views

Does body mass have a bearing on reflex speed?

A reflex is an unconscious action in response to some specific stimulus, e.g., blinking an eye, or pulling the hand away from a hot pin I know from school biology, and reading online that withdrawal ...
3
votes
1answer
45 views

Why can action potentials not be initiated at dendrites?

Why are action potentials not initiated at dendrites, although dendrites are the first to receive input from the presynaptic cell? In fact, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) at the dendrites ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

Can a postsynaptic neuron 'shut itself off?

I am an amateur interested in neuroscience and was curious whether there is a process by which a neuron or group of neurons would close their receptors and stop receiving signals from specific ...
3
votes
1answer
142 views

dopamine paradox in Schizophrenia

If there is more dopamine action in the mesocortical pathway in Schizophrenia, then the patients should always be in euphoric state. But instead patient lacks motivation and don't want pleasure. Why?
3
votes
2answers
265 views

How does the brain know where a signal came from? What is the addressing system

I am an electronic engineer so I am thinking about this from an electronics outlook. How does the addressing system work, As I see it, the nervous system is small parallel branches attached to larger ...
3
votes
1answer
339 views

What happens in your brain when you receive information which causes you to bristle?

I'm talking about moments when you watch a film and you bristle, or when you listen to music, etc. What kind of neurotransmitter flow changes?
3
votes
1answer
84 views

Do voltage-gated calcium channels affect neuronal conduction speeds?

We have a hypothesis that a drug may block the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in annelid worms. We are wondering whether there are any correlations between VGCCs and neuron conduction ...
3
votes
1answer
167 views

Hearing and neurons- do ears have a sampling period?

From what I have read, outer hair cells in the human ear amplify incoming signals and inner hair cells "pick-up" the signals and generate action potential. However, neurons have refractory periods ...
3
votes
1answer
155 views

Which Receptors are Involved in the antidepressant effects of SSRIs?

From what I've read the major receptor subtypes involved in the antidepressant effects of SSRIs are: 5-HT1A 5-HT2C 5-HT3 5-HT6 Please cite journal articles to back up your claims, I don't want any ...
3
votes
2answers
999 views

Physiological indicators of happiness and well being

If I understand it correctly, levels of serotonin in the brain can indicate if a person is happy. What other physiological measures indicate happiness or well being for a humans? I am looking for ...
3
votes
2answers
248 views

Does the speed of electrical impulses through neurones decrease with age?

From what I read on the NatGeo app, it stated that the speed of the electrical impulses that are sent by a neurone will be approximately 332 kilometers per hour. Will the speed of this electrical ...
3
votes
1answer
275 views

Why apes started to contemplate and become altruistic? [closed]

I was asking this first on philosophy forums, but it is suggested, that answer could be found from evolutionary view of point, so here we go: Again my question raised when thinking of myths, their ...
3
votes
0answers
40 views

Neural coupling between Pinsky-Rinzel (reduced Traub) neuron with a Wang-Buzsaki neuron?

I have read two papers related to modeling neurons. The first one is the paper by Pinsky and Rinzel and the second one by Wang and Buzsaki. The first mentioned neuron model is a excitatory neuron ...
3
votes
0answers
55 views

How we share pain?

When somebody else tells me about his or her itching or pain in some specific body part I sometimes begin to feel similar feelings. I can think of about three explanations: I feel pain all over my ...
3
votes
0answers
46 views

What were the first neural systems like?

I'm curious about the origin of the neural network. I'm thinking perhaps once life evolved beyond the single cell organism, it needed a simple neural network to coordinate those cells, and cell ...
3
votes
0answers
56 views

Criteria for compound action potential thresholds

As opposed to action potential thresholds (which are binary yes/no events), electrophysiological thresholds of compound action potentials are arbitrary. Mostly a certain noise level is picked and when ...