The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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Is there a scientific name for the field of study focusing on the hemispheres of the brain and their control of opposite sides of the body?

I'm assuming this field of study would focus on motor controls, movement, and exercise, but it could also focus on activities which strengthen the corpus callosum or stimulate a specific half of the ...
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73 views

Evolution, self organization and neuroscience

I have rudimentary knowledge of evolution, and biology in general, so bear with me if this question is a bit naive. Let's say we have a particular trait, like highly sensitive peripheral vision. ...
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158 views

If people with colorblindness lack one type of cone cells, shouldn't they be unable to recognize one particular color?

The 3 types of cone cells in normal humans allow them to view 3 types of colors and any color made from mixing and matching those 3. So, 2 types of cone cells should only allow to view just 2 types ...
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99 views

Is Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) commercially available?

I'm curious if NGF, or Neurotrophins in general is available commercially. Can I order it online? If not, what are the medical/biological reasons. Does it breakdown quickly after synthesis/capture? Is ...
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101 views

Inverse of dopamine reuptake inhibitor?

The wikipedia article on the dopamine transporter gives examples of some drugs whose effects are mediated by the inhibition of the dopamine transporter, such as cocaine and amphetamines. Are there ...
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33 views

Could silicon oil block Na+ ion channels in the membrane of an axon and prevent Na+ influx?

Could silicon oil block Na+ ion channels in the membrane of an axon and prevent Na+ influx? I have been wondering if Na+ influx could have been a diluting factor in anterograde fills. If so, could ...
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2k views

How do dopamine agonists like amphetamine/methylphenidate affect acetylcholine signalling?

Do they increase it, or is the effect mostly neutral?
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89 views

What triggers programmed cell death in humans (from outside the cell)?

What triggers programmed cell death in humans? Is it decided by the brain (for the entire body)? Or is it a local decision of a cell by its environment? Something else? I realize that there might be ...
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83 views

Simultaneously using both hands - How does that work?

Is some part in one hemisphere the decision maker and "calling the shots" - controlling the opposite side's hand "directly" and controlling its own side's hand through the corpus callosum. Or: is ...
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38 views

Fastest and slowest action potential

When our instructor asked us about the speed of action potentials in cells, I told him that action potentials and two-wheelers travels at similar speeds. He thought that this is an 'interesting' way ...
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78 views

Relationship between action potentials and EEG recordings

It is possible that I am overthinking this but I have difficulties relating the neural activation to the amplitude and frequency of EEG recordings. For example; if at the EEG location P3/P4 we ...
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40 views

Neurology: spinal tract

I have had a few difficulties finding answers for the questions below. I have tried answering the first two myself; but, I am not sure they are correct or not. And I am not too sure about the third ...
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47 views

Nervous system: Pain and Pleasure?

If you have a constant pain in your body, why does a greater pain or pleasure make you not feel the original pain?
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108 views

Studying the fruitfly nervous system

I'm studying Neuroscience and Fruit Flies are a pretty big deal but I don't know as much as I think I should about them. Are there and comprehensive sources that I could read? I'd like a review of ...
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77 views

What in neurons and their connections changes during the process of learning?

I'm not sure if this question belongs more in physics or biology (or maybe even computer science)... but biology seemed to fit more. What changes in the state of our brains when we learn things? ...
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65 views

Radial Basis Function Network (RBF Network)

In the Wikipedia article on radial basis function network, I didn't understand what was meant by "center vector for neuron i", in other words "center of the RBF units called also prototype".
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589 views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
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8k views

What are the functions and differences between axons and dendrites?

My textbook doesn't do a very good job of pointing out what the differences between the two are. It basically mentions axons only in the same breath as the synapse (that synapses are the endings/tips ...
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77 views

Eye Brain Mapping

If our eyes are separated by some kind of full proof barrier/isolation, is it possible that our brain can picture/visualize two different pictures at a time? How the brain will function in this ...
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128 views

Do nerve cells cause action potential in cardiac muscle?

I think the answer is no, but I am not 100% sure. If it was yes, then the dendrite of the nerve cell should each time receive a stimulus causing Na+ channels to open, when the contraction happen. ...
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145 views

How do axon terminals report to the soma?

It is important to bear in mind that the distance between a neuron's axon terminal and its soma can be extensive, up to about 1m in the human body. The fastest transport along the axon is 400mm/day ...
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54 views

Are there any neurotransmitters that trigger all neurons?

I'm reading into the basics of the nervous system, and am intrigued by neurotransmitters. I understand that certain neurotransmitters can trigger more than one neuron type, and may be used as ...
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2k views

Serotonin - Does being aroused make you sleepy?

My Psychology text book says Serotonin causes "Sleep, arousal levels and emotion" Does this really mean that when you are being aroused, Serotonin is released, which in turn makes you sleepy? If so, ...
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184 views

What is the biochemical reason for mental fatigue?

Is it known exactly why the brain needs sleep? What's dropping low / going high when we experience mental fatigue? I can see why low glucose could result in mental fatigue, are other reasons known?
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1k views

What are the positive and negative effects of insulin on cognitive function?

A UCLA study seems to imply that insulin interferes with cognitive function. The DHA-deprived rats also developed signs of resistance to insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar and ...
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Criteria for electrophysiological threshold

As opposed to action potential thresholds (which are yes/no events), electrophysiological thresholds of compound action potentials are arbitrary. Mostly a certain noise level is picked and when the ...
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43 views

What keeps resting potential of neurons constant at -70mV?

I know the sodium-potassium pump pumps out 3 Na+ ions and pumps in 2 K+ ions per reaction so the negative charge in the axon increases. However, once the voltage (difference of charge inside and ...
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26 views

Systematic anticoagulant injection after a CVA

Since most of the cerebrovascular accident are ischemic ones, would it be usefull to have anticoagulant everywhere (we already have AEDs everywhere) so that everytime someone would have symptoms of a ...
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25 views

How is saltatory conduction faster than conduction of unmyelinated fibers? [duplicate]

It's always the same explanation that currents are able to "hop" along Ranvier nodes instead of passing continuously along the axon making saltatory conduction more efficient than continuous ...
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57 views

Does pain scale with mammal mass?

Some biological features scale with the animal mass (see previous Q&A). Assuming the same concentration of nociceptors on the skin surface, I'm wondering how painful a 1 cm wound will be ...
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185 views

Does brain activity generate heat gradients in the brain?

I'm reading this article on guiding axon growth using temperature gradient, and it mentions that the trajectory of growth of neuron connections can be influenced by temperature gradients as little as ...
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59 views

Does Dorsal Raphe Nuclei firing pattern change in response to voluntary breathing?

I'm reading this paper, which discusses how Serotonin may be involved in motor functions of mammals: 5-HT and motor control: a hypothesis . The paper includes the following diagram of the Dorsal ...
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88 views

Does the Parasympathetic Tract of Colon Sigmoideum Travel with Nervus Vagus and its Nucleus Dorsalis Nervi Vagi?

I have the following tractus now: nucleus parasymphaticus sacrales -> nervus splanchnic -> ganglion terminalis -> colon sigmoideum The tract is parasympathetic. It suggests me that it should ...
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403 views

Does one neurotransmitter travel all the way through the nervous system?

Nerve impulses of course go really fast, but the neurotransmitters have to travel through millions of nerves, so how can it go that fast? Is it a sort of relay with lots of neurotransmitters taking ...
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285 views

Least painful way to die

There is a lot of talk about inhumane treatment of animals and how we don't kill them in the proper way. I wonder how much research is done on this subject. What is the overall least painful way for ...
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124 views

Chills down the spine with certain music?

I am sure many of us know the feeling of that tingling chill down our spines when listening to certain music. I experienced this most when my younger brother played an emotional piano piece for a ...
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50 views

What is accumulation and release centre of neurohormones?

What is accumulation and release centre of neurohormones? Is it hypothalamus?
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109 views

Systemic sensory confusion?

Sometimes when a person gets touched on one part of the body they feel it else where and may think it came from a different part of the body. What causes this? Other examples are similar to why you ...
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67 views

Can you disconnect sensation from the brain without destroying muscle functions?

I want to know if it would be possible for a surgeon to "shut off" a person's senses without causing paralysis of any kind. The person would have to maintain their ability to speak and move, but not ...
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114 views

Epinephrine vs. Adrenaline

Both names are widely used, with what appears to me as a slight prevalence of “epinephrine” in scientific literature and an overwhelming prevalence of “adrenaline” in popular media. Are there any ...
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42 views

How does anger relate to blood pressure?

Anger is an emotion generated by neural processes in the brain and is associated with elevated blood pressure. How can an emotion, which is totally related to brain, result in blood pressure changes?
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51 views

How do neurons send electric pulses even though they are surrounded by liquid which is mostly water?

I just thought about the fact that people move through electrical pulses traveling through neurons in the brain and muscles through the body. Here is what i know: the body is full of 97 or more, ...
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80 views

If inhibiting S6 kinase decreases protein translation, then could inhibiting S6 kinase could possibly slow down long-term potentiation in neurons?

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P70S6_kinase... Phosphorylation of S6 induces protein synthesis at the ribosome. P70S6 kinase is in a signaling pathway that includes mTOR (the mammalian ...
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9k views

How reversible is decerebrate posturing caused by brain stem damage?

This is a follow-up question to How likely would Abraham Lincoln be to survive his wounds today? You don't have to see a CT scan or autopsy to know if the brainstem is injured (directly or ...
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48 views

Satisfication with irrelevant things [closed]

I am not sure if this question is better suited CogSci.SE so please tell me. My question is why are we satisfied when we get things that aren't useful in any important way? For example, relating to ...
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25 views

What controls gut motility?

I have two different papers. One claims that gut motility is reduced by stimulation of the Opioid κ and δ receptors. The receptors are activated by Morphine and certain derivatives, specifically ...
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661 views

Whats the difference between voltage gated and ligand gated neurons? [closed]

How are they similar and how are they different?
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87 views

Mechanism of antiperistalsis

What is the mechanism of antiperistalsis that occurs during vomiting? Why the peristaltic waves normally don't propagate in anal to oral direction? Please give logical explanation with authentic ...
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1answer
50 views

Do's and Don't's of Undergraduate Research? [closed]

I was fortunate enough to get a position as a researcher for the Mayo Clinic's SURF Program this year. My PI's lab focus is on the the immune system's role in CNS axonal and neuronal injury, ...
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66 views

M-type potassium channels by muscarinic receptors

How does the closure of M-type potassium channels by muscarinic receptors result in increased excitation of the target neuron?