The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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How does an increased amplitude affect nerve conduction velocity?

My professor said that increasing the amplitude (the amount of depolarization e.g. depolarizing from -80 mV instead of -50 mV) leads to a greater conduction velocity.
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27 views

Hypoglossal nerve location

I kind of know where the hypoglossal nerve is located when I look at the diagram but I'd like to know how far is the nerve from the skin and where is the closest area to the skin before and right ...
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1answer
79 views

Neuron Growth and Regeneration

Are nerves and/or neurons able to grow and repair after damage, but not regenerate? Is this specific to humans? I have heard of people being paralyzed, but after much therapy are able to use their ...
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115 views

Does the Jungian notion of collective unconsciousness have any legitimacy in the light of modern neurobiology and epigenetics?

Carl Jung has long ago proposed a rather controversial notion of collective unconsciousness [1, 2, 3], a form of the unconscious (that part of the mind containing memories and impulses of which ...
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1answer
68 views

What is the mechanism responsible for the 'delay' in delayed rectifier potassium channels?

I've been trying to find a comprehensive explanation concerning the nature of the 'delay' in neurons' delayed rectifier potassium channels. As it's written in my intro to neuroscience textbook, these ...
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72 views

Biology Experiment Data (Hodgkin-Huxley)

I'm doing research into the Hodgkin-Huxley Model from an electronics/mathematics perspective and I'm looking to find actual numerical results from experiments on squid axons. I want to compare the ...
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86 views

What causes headaches (biologically)? What does it mean directly? [closed]

Even though your brain can't feel pain, thingies in your head are installed to compensate for that. Once I thought your head starts to hurt when your brain is tired. I can't believe this any more. ...
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1answer
151 views

Exercise vs stimulants, which is more effective for promoting concentration?

Stimulants are the first choice for treating ADHD. But we also know that exercise helps to improve concentration. We know that both stimulants and exercise increase bloodflow to muscles and to the ...
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80 views

Organisms with the most extreme sensory capabilities? (sight, smell, sound) [closed]

Background It is quite mind boggling to imagine what it would be like to be missing sight, sound, touch, smell, taste etc. Question Which organism holds the record for most extreme sensory ...
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68 views

Does pain scale with mammal mass?

Some biological features scale with the animal mass (see previous Q&A). Assuming the same concentration of nociceptors on the skin surface, I'm wondering how painful a 1 cm wound will be ...
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474 views

Does brain activity generate heat gradients in the brain?

I'm reading this article on guiding axon growth using temperature gradient, and it mentions that the trajectory of growth of neuron connections can be influenced by temperature gradients as little as ...
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143 views

How long does Lentivirus take to express in vivo mouse neurons?

Does anyone know how long it takes for a standard Lentivirus vector to express its genes (under a strong promoter such as CAG, CB7, etc.), after injection into the brain of a mouse? By hearsay I ...
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72 views

Does Dorsal Raphe Nuclei firing pattern change in response to voluntary breathing?

I'm reading this paper, which discusses how Serotonin may be involved in motor functions of mammals: 5-HT and motor control: a hypothesis . The paper includes the following diagram of the Dorsal ...
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1answer
53 views

Can we change the direction of a neurological signal? [closed]

My question is can we change the direction of a neurological signal? When a neurological signal is generated it goes to the brain. Along the way it passes synapses. Can we make it change it's pathway ...
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2answers
386 views

Epinephrine vs. Adrenaline

Both names are widely used, with what appears to me as a slight prevalence of “epinephrine” in scientific literature and an overwhelming prevalence of “adrenaline” in popular media. Are there any ...
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3answers
242 views

Action Potential Distribution On Synapses

This is a biology+physics question. Since there is no biology section, I am asking here. In brain, when a neuron reaches to threshold value, it fires an action potential. In most graphics, that is ...
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1answer
860 views

Does one neurotransmitter travel all the way through the nervous system?

Nerve impulses of course go really fast, but the neurotransmitters have to travel through millions of nerves, so how can it go that fast? Is it a sort of relay with lots of neurotransmitters taking ...
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2answers
3k views

What is the difference between a graded potential and an action potential?

I was under the impression the only signals neurons send using changes in membrane potential are action potentials. But my biology professor showed us diagrams of graded potentials and action ...
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1answer
171 views

Molecules and human memory

Has it been demonstrated that the memory of human brain is just connections between neurons, not "long" molecules such as RNA or proteins?
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162 views

What do nerves have to do with feeling nervous?

I was thinking about how when people say: "Nerve cells don't regenerate" (which is, apparently, not true at least for some kinds of nerves) and "You're making me nervous" they might not refer to the ...
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1answer
60 views

Are there neuronal firing artifacts produced by head movement?

I'm experimenting with a consumer-grade ElectroEncephaloGram (EEG) sensor and have created the image below using the device. Because the sensor on the device does not use a suction cup, there are a ...
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4answers
750 views

Are neural connections one-way?

I'm trying to think about how two neurons communicate, typically shown in pictures as an electric pulse traveling along a long, thin connective tissue. Is this depiction somewhat accurate, and if so, ...
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1answer
65 views

Is it possible for neurons themselves to manifest cancerous behavior?

From what I understand, one form of cancer is a faulty gene responsible for the programmed death of a cell. Not long ago, popular wisdom used to say neurons don't regenerate. However that is no ...
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1answer
58 views

Does sympathetic nervous system acts bilaterally for pupil dilation or other two sided organs?

The question might seem weird. Does sympathetic nervous system acts 'bilaterally' meaning if you shout to a person's left ear a loud noise (e.g. by headphones), will it activate sympathetic system ...
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3answers
100 views

Are there “multi-frequency” signals within a human brain?

I know that neurons can exhibit tonic and phasic firing, and also that a neuron is sometimes called an integrator. This makes me interested to know if there are activities in the brain that depend on ...
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2answers
120 views

Is there a difference between visual sensation and imagination in the brain?

How substantial is the difference between the neural signal associated with seeing an image and the imagination of that image? Surely, it can not entirely copy the pathway from the sensory organs to ...
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1answer
161 views

How does anger relate to blood pressure?

Anger is an emotion generated by neural processes in the brain and is associated with elevated blood pressure. How can an emotion, which is totally related to brain, result in blood pressure changes?
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31 views

Is the brain functionally symmetrical?

I understand that each half of the human brain handles different parts of our thinking. Left brain, right brain, that whole topic. But in pictures, the brain is always depicted as having symmetrical ...
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99 views

Alpha wave frequency variance in EEG of single subject over period of a few hours?

I have an Emotiv EPOC (EEG headset: 128 SPS, notch filter @60 Hz, felt saline contacts) I've been playing around with. Over the course of two or three hours using CCA to plot an SNR contour against ...
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1answer
33 views

Why is stimulation of nerve tissue with a negative pulse called “cathodic” stimulation?

By definition, the cathode is defined as the terminal through which current exits a polarized device. But in the context of neuromodulation, such as spinal cord stimulation, deep brain stimulation, ...
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2answers
118 views

Why do nerve cells convert electric signals to chemical signals?

One would assume that a faster response time in the nervous system would be beneficial. However, nerve cells have to convert electrical impulses to chemical signals and cross a synapse. Why didn't ...
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2answers
110 views

Introductory book in genetics? [duplicate]

I am working in the field of neuroscience with a background in computer science. I try to find new ways of analyzing brain imaging data (mostly MRI, EEG, MEG, fMRI) with modern machine learning ...
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1answer
288 views

Do rare earth metals actually repel sharks? [closed]

Stroud claims that sharks are effectively repelled by the use of rare earth metals in the water. There has even been a patent issued by the same author for rare earth-wrapped fish hooks to reduce the ...
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1answer
43 views

Can the Hebbian theory apply to Inhibitory Neurons

If I understand the basic Hebbian theory, when a neuron fires a pulse to another neuron and this pulse causes the target neuron to fire then the delta energy sent from the initial neuron to the target ...
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1answer
32 views

Is it a medical condition to not able to recall the word in a language while having a conversation [closed]

While having a conversation it happens to some peopl that clearly they know there exists a perfect word to be used but can not recall it during the conversation in real time and hence forced to use ...
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1answer
9k views

Whats the difference between voltage gated and ligand gated neurons? [closed]

How are they similar and how are they different?
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1answer
49 views

Specifics of decussation

Beginner question here: The definition of decussation I see is the crossing through the midline of a bunch of neurons. But I was wondering if there was a little more to it than this, because I'm ...
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1answer
41 views

Nervous System : Organ or Gland Failure

If an organ was to start failing, not total failure, such as the thyroid gland, is it possible that the fault may not lie in the failure of the organ but in the nerve signals coming from the brain?
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1answer
40 views

Nervous system : Nerve signals [duplicate]

If the electrical signals from all the various organs throughout the body eventually connect to the nerves in the spinal column traveling up to the brain, how does the brain differentiate the ...
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1answer
68 views

Is there a scientific name for the field of study focusing on the hemispheres of the brain and their control of opposite sides of the body?

I'm assuming this field of study would focus on motor controls, movement, and exercise, but it could also focus on activities which strengthen the corpus callosum or stimulate a specific half of the ...
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1answer
76 views

Evolution, self organization and neuroscience

I have rudimentary knowledge of evolution, and biology in general, so bear with me if this question is a bit naive. Let's say we have a particular trait, like highly sensitive peripheral vision. ...
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1answer
194 views

If people with colorblindness lack one type of cone cells, shouldn't they be unable to recognize one particular color?

The 3 types of cone cells in normal humans allow them to view 3 types of colors and any color made from mixing and matching those 3. So, 2 types of cone cells should only allow to view just 2 types ...
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428 views

Is Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) commercially available?

I'm curious if NGF, or Neurotrophins in general is available commercially. Can I order it online? If not, what are the medical/biological reasons. Does it breakdown quickly after synthesis/capture? Is ...
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2answers
151 views

Inverse of dopamine reuptake inhibitor?

The wikipedia article on the dopamine transporter gives examples of some drugs whose effects are mediated by the inhibition of the dopamine transporter, such as cocaine and amphetamines. Are there ...
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1answer
34 views

Could silicon oil block Na+ ion channels in the membrane of an axon and prevent Na+ influx?

Could silicon oil block Na+ ion channels in the membrane of an axon and prevent Na+ influx? I have been wondering if Na+ influx could have been a diluting factor in anterograde fills. If so, could ...
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1answer
3k views

How do dopamine agonists like amphetamine/methylphenidate affect acetylcholine signalling?

Do they increase it, or is the effect mostly neutral?
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1answer
41 views

What is 'noise'?

In both my psychology, biology and neuroscience classes, professors are constantly talking about 'noise'. For instance, our perception is limited due to 'sensory noise' in our neurons. I am utterly ...
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51 views

How difficult is it to make a shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in humans?

There have been various research projects that experimented with shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to specifically silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in small animals like rats & guinea pigs. ...
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1answer
40 views

Is this “Sympathetic fight response” axis accurate?

Peripheral sensory cell > Preganglionic cell > Dorsal root ganglia cell in the ''Sympathetic chain'' > Ventral root ganglia cell in the ''sympathetic chain'' > Post-ganglionic cell that activates an ...
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62 views

Dendrodendritic synapse through axodendritic synapse at same dendrite?

Reading Wikipedia's article of dendrodendritic synapse, I find that: Dendrodendritic synapses are activated in a similar fashion to axodendritic synapses in respects to using a chemical synapse. ...