The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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Studying the fruitfly nervous system

I'm studying Neuroscience and Fruit Flies are a pretty big deal but I don't know as much as I think I should about them. Are there and comprehensive sources that I could read? I'd like a review of ...
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112 views

What in neurons and their connections changes during the process of learning?

I'm not sure if this question belongs more in physics or biology (or maybe even computer science)... but biology seemed to fit more. What changes in the state of our brains when we learn things? ...
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73 views

Radial Basis Function Network (RBF Network)

In the Wikipedia article on radial basis function network, I didn't understand what was meant by "center vector for neuron i", in other words "center of the RBF units called also prototype".
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1k views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
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80 views

Eye Brain Mapping

If our eyes are separated by some kind of full proof barrier/isolation, is it possible that our brain can picture/visualize two different pictures at a time? How the brain will function in this ...
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147 views

Do nerve cells cause action potential in cardiac muscle?

I think the answer is no, but I am not 100% sure. If it was yes, then the dendrite of the nerve cell should each time receive a stimulus causing Na+ channels to open, when the contraction happen. ...
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164 views

How do axon terminals report to the soma?

It is important to bear in mind that the distance between a neuron's axon terminal and its soma can be extensive, up to about 1m in the human body. The fastest transport along the axon is 400mm/day ...
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56 views

Are there any neurotransmitters that trigger all neurons?

I'm reading into the basics of the nervous system, and am intrigued by neurotransmitters. I understand that certain neurotransmitters can trigger more than one neuron type, and may be used as ...
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2k views

Serotonin - Does being aroused make you sleepy?

My Psychology text book says Serotonin causes "Sleep, arousal levels and emotion" Does this really mean that when you are being aroused, Serotonin is released, which in turn makes you sleepy? If so, ...
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1k views

What are the positive and negative effects of insulin on cognitive function?

A UCLA study seems to imply that insulin interferes with cognitive function. The DHA-deprived rats also developed signs of resistance to insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar and ...
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1answer
14 views

What were the symptoms of Phineas Gage after suffering his brain injury?

Phineas Gage was a construction worker who suffered a head injury due to an explosion at a construction site. A metal rod was pushed up his cheek and through his head. I have heard he demonstrated ...
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29 views

Can our eyes see faster? [on hold]

There are some animals that react faster than normal rate (like flies, etc). I guess it's because they can see faster than other animals and humans, as if time passes slower for them. I think some ...
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2answers
25 views

How do neurons recieve ions needed for creating electical pulse?

I really wonder what is responsible for getting ions into the brain and into the neurons for creating electrical potentials - how do ions get from our digestive system to neurons. Or are the ions just ...
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33 views

Biological implementation of convolutional neural networks

In computer science, 'convolutional neural networks' are used, that are meant to be inspired by biological network structures like found in the human brain visual cortex. In the computer ...
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37 views

How nerves interact with other cells? [closed]

I read in a book by Mick O'Hare, that injuries inflicted by electric current are caused by tension of your muscles. Is that explainable only with physics or nerves really use electrical signal as ...
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25 views

classical conditioning paradigm for hippocampal learning

I wanted to know what a suitable classical conditioning experiment would be to analyze learning and memory capabilities in rodent models with respect to hippocampal long-term potentiation. For ...
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82 views

Why can we control our breath rate but not our heart rate? [closed]

Even though we cannot survive for more than few minutes if we stop breathing or if our heart stops, why is it so that our heart beat is controlled involuntarily while breathing can be voluntarily ...
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30 views

Regarding cryonics, why can't you freeze a living body and then thaw it later, fully functional?

Cryonics is very popular in science fiction today, as a method of preserving animals, including humans, for long time storage and thawing the tissue later in the future. What is the difficulties with ...
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42 views

Further progression with neuroscience education [closed]

Question for you I hope this is in the right area and all if not please advise on where to put it, Having taken biological neuroscience for a year now as a masters program I feel like I want to go ...
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27 views

Immediate Early Genes during sleep

In Neuroscience 3rd ed by Bear et al. on page 607, immediate early genes are described as related to changing synaptic strength, yet have decreased expression during sleep. The explanation given is ...
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30 views

Systematic anticoagulant injection after a CVA

Since most of the cerebrovascular accident are ischemic ones, would it be usefull to have anticoagulant everywhere (we already have AEDs everywhere) so that everytime someone would have symptoms of a ...
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27 views

How is saltatory conduction faster than conduction of unmyelinated fibers? [duplicate]

It's always the same explanation that currents are able to "hop" along Ranvier nodes instead of passing continuously along the axon making saltatory conduction more efficient than continuous ...
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331 views

Does brain activity generate heat gradients in the brain?

I'm reading this article on guiding axon growth using temperature gradient, and it mentions that the trajectory of growth of neuron connections can be influenced by temperature gradients as little as ...
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1answer
92 views

Does the Parasympathetic Tract of Colon Sigmoideum Travel with Nervus Vagus and its Nucleus Dorsalis Nervi Vagi?

I have the following tractus now: nucleus parasymphaticus sacrales -> nervus splanchnic -> ganglion terminalis -> colon sigmoideum The tract is parasympathetic. It suggests me that it should ...
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1answer
47 views

Can we change the direction of a neurological signal? [closed]

My question is can we change the direction of a neurological signal? When a neurological signal is generated it goes to the brain. Along the way it passes synapses. Can we make it change it's pathway ...
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82 views

What is the difference between a graded potential and an action potential?

I was under the impression the only signals neurons send using changes in membrane potential are action potentials. But my biology professor showed us diagrams of graded potentials and action ...
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318 views

Least painful way to die

There is a lot of talk about inhumane treatment of animals and how we don't kill them in the proper way. I wonder how much research is done on this subject. What is the overall least painful way for ...
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139 views

Chills down the spine with certain music?

I am sure many of us know the feeling of that tingling chill down our spines when listening to certain music. I experienced this most when my younger brother played an emotional piano piece for a ...
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168 views

Can you disconnect sensation from the brain without destroying muscle functions?

I want to know if it would be possible for a surgeon to "shut off" a person's senses without causing paralysis of any kind. The person would have to maintain their ability to speak and move, but not ...
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100 views

What is accumulation and release centre of neurohormones?

What is accumulation and release centre of neurohormones? Is it hypothalamus?
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170 views

Systemic sensory confusion?

Sometimes when a person gets touched on one part of the body they feel it else where and may think it came from a different part of the body. What causes this? Other examples are similar to why you ...
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1answer
28 views

Is it a medical condition to not able to recall the word in a language while having a conversation [closed]

While having a conversation it happens to some peopl that clearly they know there exists a perfect word to be used but can not recall it during the conversation in real time and hence forced to use ...
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1answer
109 views

How does anger relate to blood pressure?

Anger is an emotion generated by neural processes in the brain and is associated with elevated blood pressure. How can an emotion, which is totally related to brain, result in blood pressure changes?
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60 views

How do neurons send electric pulses even though they are surrounded by liquid which is mostly water?

I just thought about the fact that people move through electrical pulses traveling through neurons in the brain and muscles through the body. Here is what i know: the body is full of 97 or more, ...
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81 views

If inhibiting S6 kinase decreases protein translation, then could inhibiting S6 kinase could possibly slow down long-term potentiation in neurons?

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P70S6_kinase... Phosphorylation of S6 induces protein synthesis at the ribosome. P70S6 kinase is in a signaling pathway that includes mTOR (the mammalian ...
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11k views

How reversible is decerebrate posturing caused by brain stem damage?

This is a follow-up question to How likely would Abraham Lincoln be to survive his wounds today? You don't have to see a CT scan or autopsy to know if the brainstem is injured (directly or ...
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139 views

What triggers programmed cell death in humans (from outside the cell)?

What triggers programmed cell death in humans? Is it decided by the brain (for the entire body)? Or is it a local decision of a cell by its environment? Something else? I realize that there might be ...
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56 views

Satisfication with irrelevant things [closed]

I am not sure if this question is better suited CogSci.SE so please tell me. My question is why are we satisfied when we get things that aren't useful in any important way? For example, relating to ...
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4k views

Whats the difference between voltage gated and ligand gated neurons? [closed]

How are they similar and how are they different?
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226 views

Mechanism of antiperistalsis

What is the mechanism of antiperistalsis that occurs during vomiting? Why the peristaltic waves normally don't propagate in anal to oral direction? Please give logical explanation with authentic ...
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1answer
52 views

Do's and Don't's of Undergraduate Research? [closed]

I was fortunate enough to get a position as a researcher for the Mayo Clinic's SURF Program this year. My PI's lab focus is on the the immune system's role in CNS axonal and neuronal injury, ...
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126 views

M-type potassium channels by muscarinic receptors

How does the closure of M-type potassium channels by muscarinic receptors result in increased excitation of the target neuron?
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4 views

Why is dopamine considered both an excitatory and Inhibitory neurotransmitter? [duplicate]

To me it seems the one allows flow and the other prevents flow. How does dopamine do both?
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24 views

Why after physical activity I see flickering concentric circles? [duplicate]

After prolonged hard physical exercise such as running uphill I sometimes experience rapidly vibrating black-and-white concentric circles for a few minutes, looking like a sinusoidal zone plate, small ...
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16 views

Retinal eccentricity to colour sensitivity [duplicate]

Colour perception goes out to 50 degrees but is the sensitivity to RGB. Question is it the same in the four quadrants of the retinal field? That is if the red colour sensitivity eg is 30 temporal ...
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14 views

More vectors for inducing neurodegeneration (reduction in synaptic plasticity) in D.melanogaster

I've just finished a project on loss of synaptic plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster larvae with uas control gal4 sensor for cAMP expressed in the motor neurons. I induced neurodegeneration through ...
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26 views

Gastroenteritis virus causing mutation of the Enterochromaffin cells

I am working on the solution to a worldwide problem: IBS or chronic diarrhea following a viral gastroenteritis infection. I think I have an answer. The only missing piece to the puzzle I found in a ...
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32 views

Is it possible to convert nerve signals or electrical pulses into a readable format? [duplicate]

Can we have the technology to recreate the informations (like images, sounds etc.)[as in the form of signals in our mind] from human mind to human understandable format? In short, can we read human ...
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28 views

Stress regulation in mosquitoes

I was just trying to understand how in insects, specifically mosquitoes does the process of emergency responding, stress regulation take place? Or in simpler words how are flight, fright and fight ...
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1answer
283 views

A good textbook on Neuroscience [closed]

I want to start learning Neuroscience. Can someone give me an advice about a nice textbook for beginners? I'm particularly interested in the application of Neuroscience in programming and AI ...