The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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1answer
30 views

Stimulate a nerve [on hold]

My question is that can we stimulate a nerve from far distance? Distances about 5 to 6 cm. Or can we send a stimulation to a nerve from a non neuroal tissue? Edit : excuse me but instead of ...
3
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1answer
183 views

Have webs woven by LSD-intoxicated spiders ever been studied for their efficiency in fly catching?

I ask, because I have a different interpretation of the experiments performed on web-weaving spiders. The famous Robert Pirsig maintains that LSD is somehow helpful to web-weaving spiders, because it ...
2
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2answers
61 views

Is numbness the absence of one or all touch sensations?

I am studying the effects of tetrodotoxin and its symptoms when consumed. Numbness is one of the first sensations reported. But I googled numbness and I couldn't find information about whether this ...
4
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2answers
60 views

Can axons act as receptors?

In all histology books, it is stated that all sensory nerve endings (receptors) consist of dendrites that translate physical stimuli from the environment into neural signals. However, several sensory ...
10
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1answer
530 views

Why do antidepressants have a delayed onset of action?

Why do antidepressants take so long to reach efficacy? I've read of theories about it perhaps being due to the strength of negative feedback via serotonergic and adrenergic autoreceptors during the ...
35
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4answers
3k views

Why do smaller mammals move intermittently?

I was watching a nice little video on youtube but couldn't help but notice how snappy smaller animals such as rats and chipmunks move. By snappy I mean how the animal moves in almost discrete states ...
0
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0answers
14 views

Obtain detailed acyclic graph from nipype [on hold]

The nipype documentation tells me that with workflow.write_graph(), I can obtain acyclic graphs like this: However, my workflows, (all containing ...
1
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2answers
45 views

What would happen if brain neurons did not reduce their sensitivity to neurotransmitters after prolonged exposure?

From my understanding, neurons decrease their sensitivity to neurotransmitters by reducing the amount of receptors on the cell membrane in response to sustained neurotransmitter activity. One ...
0
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2answers
72 views

What is the difference between a graded potential and an action potential?

I was under the impression the only signals neurons send using changes in membrane potential are action potentials. But my biology professor showed us diagrams of graded potentials and action ...
8
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1answer
68 views

Can we change our dopamine baseline levels?

Can we change our dopamine baseline levels? High dopamine levels improve alertness, problem solving, but may also cause anxiety and aggression. I've read that smiling and laughing, eating certain ...
-1
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1answer
51 views

Can plants feel pain? [closed]

I was wondering whether plants could feel pain, for example, does grass feel pain when you mow the lawn? Or do the plants and trees that grow vegetables and fruits feel pain when you harvest them? ...
1
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0answers
25 views

Biological implementation of convolutional neural networks

In computer science, 'convolutional neural networks' are used, that are meant to be inspired by biological network structures like found in the human brain visual cortex. In the computer ...
3
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0answers
35 views

Does tremor frequency generally increase as Parkinson's disease progresses?

I've been trying to research this question, but most if not all the on-line journals require costly subscription, and the studies that are posted look at tremor frequency with regards to other ...
4
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1answer
89 views

What determines whether an action potential is inhibitory or excitatory?

What determines whether an action potential is inhibitory or excitatory? Is it determined by the receptors, the neurotransmitters, or some other mechanism?
4
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1answer
818 views

Is there a relationship between Melatonin, Norepinephrine and depression in humans?

I'm reading a booklet on melatonin published in 1996, titled "Melatonin and the Biological Clock". This particular paragraph caught my attention and I would like to better understand what it means: ...
2
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2answers
12k views

What are the functions and differences between axons and dendrites?

My textbook doesn't do a very good job of pointing out what the differences between the two are. It basically mentions axons only in the same breath as the synapse (that synapses are the endings/tips ...
5
votes
1answer
61 views

Is transplantation of neurons between species possible?

Can brain tissue from one species be implanted into the brain of another species? Because the brain is tolerant to the introduction of antigens (it is said to be immuno-privileged), I was wondering ...
4
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2answers
87 views

Does learning increase the number of neurons in the brain?

I am attempting to understand neurogenesis related to learning. Does learning increase the number of neurons in the human brain? What would be some good scientific publications to read?
1
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1answer
45 views

Can we change the direction of a neurological signal? [closed]

My question is can we change the direction of a neurological signal? When a neurological signal is generated it goes to the brain. Along the way it passes synapses. Can we make it change it's pathway ...
3
votes
2answers
45 views

Why do negative ions flow into a cell in an inhibitory synapse, even though a neuron has a negative resting potential?

In my spare time I have been reading an introductory Psychology textbook and this question came to my mind after reading about action potentials. I have no previous knowledge in chemistry so if I do ...
14
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2answers
1k views

How to make a fake auditory signal?

My question is about making fake auditory signals. The ear collects sounds from the environment, which are transformed into a neural signal by the hair cells in the inner ear. This signal is sent ...
7
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2answers
77 views

What features cause mechano sensory adaptation?

In relation to mechanoreceptors (e.g. pacinian corpuscles), what stops a constant stimulus from producing action potentials? I understand that adaption is used to filter out stimuli that aren't ...
19
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1answer
4k views

What do you see when your eyes are closed?

If you are in pitch black and you close your eyes, you sometimes can see strange shapes of various colors. A lot of the time these shapes and colors change as you observe them. This phenomenon still ...
1
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1answer
41 views

Hodgin-Huxley model for a single neuron - continuation

As continuation to This question I have posted. Another set of questions is given for the same model : This time it is also given that for $t<0$ the membrane potential is $u_0$, and at $t=0$ it ...
3
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1answer
51 views

Hodgin-Huxley model for a single neuron

I am viewing (through edX ) an introduction course to computational neuroscience. In the second lecture, the Hodgin-Huxley model is considered. I am going over some of the questions and have ...
5
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2answers
699 views

How is membrane capacitance related to the increased speed of saltatory conduction?

Here is the original question which inspired my question. As explained by the answers there, the reason saltatory conduction in myelinated neurons is faster than non-myelinated conduction is because ...
2
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1answer
57 views

What determines the pathway of a neurological signal?

My question is about the neurological signals. In our body when a signal, for example a hearing signal from hair cells, is built, it goes through a lot of neurons and it passes a lot of synapses. I am ...
2
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4answers
134 views

Can connections between neurons be weakened?

Connections between neurons are said (by Wikipedia) to be strengthened as part of learning - can they also be weakened (below the original level)? I understand the concept of the connections ...
6
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1answer
111 views

Why does the human brain not overfit when training at some task?

One of the problems that occur during (artificial) neural network training is called overfitting. The error on the training set is driven to a very small value, but when new data is presented to ...
7
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1answer
111 views

What is the mechanism behind tinnitus?

I seem to have come across two contrasting explanations for tinnitus induced by loud noises- i.e. damage to the hair cells in the cochlea. On the one hand, I have read that damage to the hair cells ...
1
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2answers
232 views

Epinephrine vs. Adrenaline

Both names are widely used, with what appears to me as a slight prevalence of “epinephrine” in scientific literature and an overwhelming prevalence of “adrenaline” in popular media. Are there any ...
7
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1answer
735 views

Lumosity.com? Is it based on science?

I always see these Lumosity adds on TV, and I personally feel they are just trying to "sell me something". I did some layman's research(wikipedia) and read that "Studies of Lumosity's effectiveness ...
1
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0answers
36 views

How nerves interact with other cells? [closed]

I read in a book by Mick O'Hare, that injuries inflicted by electric current are caused by tension of your muscles. Is that explainable only with physics or nerves really use electrical signal as ...
2
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1answer
93 views

What are dreams, biologically?

Falling asleep or states of subconsciousness does not stop the mind from making its own fictional images. These seem like sensations just like those received from human eyes. But, how do we define ...
1
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2answers
56 views

Introductory book in genetics? [duplicate]

I am working in the field of neuroscience with a background in computer science. I try to find new ways of analyzing brain imaging data (mostly MRI, EEG, MEG, fMRI) with modern machine learning ...
4
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1answer
72 views

Criteria for compound action potential thresholds

As opposed to action potential thresholds (which are binary yes/no events), electrophysiological thresholds of compound action potentials are arbitrary. Mostly a certain noise level is picked and when ...
4
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1answer
43 views

Is the autonomic nervous system only activated by internal stimuli?

My professor claims that the autonomic nervous system is only activated by stimuli from organs but I really feel like I've read that it can be activated by outside stimuli, although I'm not sure what ...
10
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1answer
164 views

Why does getting certain chemicals in cuts hurt?

More specifically, shampoo. What are the mechanics of detecting a noxious chemical stimulus in terms of which receptors recognise what, how do they do it, and how is this information relayed to the ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Do both Carbamazepinum and Lamotriginum increase glutamate threshold?

I have in my notes that: Carbamazepinum increases threshold for glutamate Lamotriginum delays release of glutamic acid I would like to simplify these sentences into a single line. I would like to ...
3
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0answers
222 views

Saltatory Conduction Of Nerve Impulses

I am aware about some basics of Saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. I know that the nerve impulses(ionic flow and the depolarization) are transferred from the node to the node in myelinated nerve ...
9
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2answers
171 views

How can action potentials be generated through thoughts?

I think I understand how a signal is transferred from neuron to neuron (from How do the brain and nerves create electrical pulses?). My question, however, is not about the standard textbook material ...
1
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1answer
109 views

Do rare earth metals actually repel sharks? [closed]

Stroud claims that sharks are effectively repelled by the use of rare earth metals in the water. There has even been a patent issued by the same author for rare earth-wrapped fish hooks to reduce the ...
4
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2answers
68 views

Mechanism behind negative conductance of ion channels

I am struggling to understand negative conductance shown on I-V curves on ion channels. Mechanistically, negative conductance means that inward (or outward) current increases when voltage across ...
11
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1answer
354 views

How old does a baby have to be before it can retain memories?

For most people (my earliest memories are of perhaps when I was 2 or so) their earliest memories would be when they were over a year old. How old does the average baby have to be before it can ...
10
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1answer
978 views

What kind of memory is “keyboard/keypad memory”?

I work in IT and I have observed many people who cannot remember their iPhone passwords or computer passwords off the top of their head. However, if presented with a keyboard or a phone with a ...
5
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1answer
37 views

Can nociceptors die because of too much mechanical stress?

In martial art people hit their body (e.g., with small bean bags) to become more insensitive to pain. Can the sensory neurons die during this procedure? I think this is just an urban legend. Instead, ...
4
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1answer
104 views

Why can action potentials not be initiated at dendrites?

Why are action potentials not initiated at dendrites, although dendrites are the first to receive input from the presynaptic cell? In fact, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) at the dendrites ...
17
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1answer
314 views

How does Sodium Valproate cause neural plasticity

I have been reading a fascinating paper: Valproate reopens critical-period learning of absolute pitch 18 individuals were given Sodium Valproate (VPA) for a fortnight during which they trained on a ...
9
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1answer
136 views

Can people with paralyzed eye muscles see?

As far as I am aware, the saccades of the eye are central to visual perception. If the eye is held still, the human stops seeing, even if light is reaching the retina and the visual pathway is intact. ...
2
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1answer
85 views

What would be required to evolve an animal (non-human) brain to obtain human-level cognition? [closed]

Could any animal subject to the right conditions evolve human-level intelligence? Suppose that an artificial intelligence (AI) decided to artificially evolve a population of octopus (don't ask why, ...