The principles, conventions, and terms used to systematically classify biological information, entities, processes, but also subfields of biology.

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1answer
30 views

Are corn kernels considered a grain

I have seen corn described as a seed, a grain and a fruit. What are the kernels or a corncob considered to be? A grain, a seed or a fruit?
2
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2answers
60 views

Why “broad” instead of “large” cross-immunoreactivity? [closed]

From the articles I read, expressions like "broad cross-immunoreactivity" pops up a lot. So, I was wondering, why "broad" is used here instead of large? Is there a specific reason?
0
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1answer
26 views

NCBI-geo differences between platforms,series and samples

This is the first time that I use NCBI-GEO and I've faced with 3 different categories inside it. They are platform, sample and ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Why are Oxyuranus snake species named Taipan?

It is interesting, why are Oxyuranus species called Taipan. The snakes are Australian but taipan looks like of Chinese origin word (it means big shot - important person).
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Genetic notations

Genetic testing revealed these two mutations (hypothetically): IVS11+6G>A and IVS11-4G>A Could you please explain every part of this notation, especially "+" and "-" signs.
3
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1answer
111 views

Why do people in the scientific community use terminology such as renal, hepatic, cardiac instead of kidney, liver and heart? [closed]

Why is there the need to map these everyday words into another set of words, it seems to complicate matters. Is it done mostly out of tradition or is there some logical basis to it?
3
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1answer
163 views

Differences between Gradualism and Uniformitarianism

From what I understand, gradualism is the idea that small changes affect species over time. Uniformitarianism argues that the same processes that occurred in the past are the same as those in the ...
15
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2answers
1k views

What's the difference between male and female?

As long as we only look at humans the differences are clear: males have chromosomes XY, produce sperm and don't get pregnant. Females have chromosomes XX, produce egg cells and bear babies. But when ...
4
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2answers
102 views

What is called the “area size that an animal usually lives in”?

What is called the "area size that an animal usually lives in" or "needs for a normal life"? Is there any specific term?
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3answers
41 views

How do scientists decide which version of a polymorphism is the main one?

This in fact has bugged me for years, but now I finally remembered to ask. I suppose that if one variation is more frequent, it can be labeled as the default, but what about variations that are ...
3
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1answer
59 views

List of dinosaurs synonyms

Is there a comprehensive list of dinosaurs synonyms with indications of which name is now considered correct? Something like "there's no brontosaurus, there's only Apatosaurus", "there's no ...
-1
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3answers
310 views

Why scientific names of animals & plants are made difficult to spell & remember?

Why scientific names of animals & plants are made difficult to spell & remember? Mango: it is easy to spell. Corvus splendens: it is difficult to spell
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2answers
1k views

Is there an organism which has a common English name which overlaps with another organism's scientific name (or vice versa?)

Many organisms have their common names identical to their scientific names. For example, there exist apes of the genus Gorilla known commonly as gorillas, and plants of the genus Delphinium known as ...
4
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1answer
38 views

Plural of “dibamus”

Migrated from English site. Dibamus is a genus of legless lizards in the family Dibamidae, of the infraorder Dibamia. Genera are usually given in singular, so what is the correct plural of ...
10
votes
1answer
586 views

Dreadnoughtus: Why are new taxa named using Dog Latin?

Once upon a time, binomial nomenclature was expected to follow Latin rules: the genus had to be a noun and the species had to be an adjective that agreed with the genus according to Latin rules of ...
6
votes
1answer
149 views

Why does DNA have its name?

Why is DNA called deoxyribonucleic acid and not something else? I get the nucleic acid part (because that's what DNA is made of) but what about the deoxyribo- part, especially the ribo- part. Maybe ...
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2answers
163 views

What are the rules for plasmid names?

What are best practices for naming newly created plasmids? For example, a common format is pABC123. What is the exact specification? Must there be 3 letters? What ...
10
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2answers
476 views

When writing about past research should I use the species name they employed or the modern version?

I am currently writing a literature review in which I am talking about the old research on the subject. When this research was carried out the species I'm talking about were classed under a different ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

What does the root “phyllum” mean used botanical binomial nomenclature

I often encounter the root "phyllum" in bionomial names in botany, but I've had trouble finding an actual definition for this root in any Latin dictionary outside of its taxonomic meaning. From ...
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2answers
232 views

What are the genus and species name of different breeds of dog?

Can you refer me to a good source containing the genus and species name of different breeds of dogs?
5
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1answer
115 views

Why is it called “Ebola virus disease”, not just “Ebola” or “Ebola disease”?

Why do scientists (pretty consistently) call it Ebola virus disease, rather than just Ebola, or Ebola disease? Many other diseases are caused by viruses, but they don't seem to have this detail of ...
4
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1answer
95 views

What is the context in which a species gets the name “elegans”

Quite a lot of Latin binomials from different genera contain the same species name. For example, there are a number of that reflect the physical properties of the species (Tables have the latin name, ...
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2answers
96 views

What would be the scientific name of this worm

I saw this pic while crawling online and it was a bit different for me to predict which worm is this. Source: http://www.seafishingtackle4u.com/softbaits/ragworms-latex-lures/ It appears somewhat ...
6
votes
2answers
105 views

Which species were first described by Charles Darwin?

There are many plants and animals named for the naturalist Charles Darwin, such as Darwin's Frog (Rhinoderma darwinii), but which were named by him? I'm finding it difficult to find such a list.
3
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1answer
84 views

what would be the scientific name of this variety of dove

recently i came across a small dove who had its feathers tied by a rubber band so that it $would'nt$ fly. it looks some what like this i was stunned by seeing it as i have never seen a dove in ...
2
votes
2answers
312 views

What are these strings used to describe animals?

For example, what's a $dt^{sz}$ hamster? (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1144494/). What's a Rgs9-Cre/+;gtROSA/+ mouse? ...
2
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2answers
83 views

Is the tomato a very very close relative of the pepper?

I ask because if you look at a tomato, the way it grows on a vine, its color, the texture, and make up of its skin and internal structure it seems very much like a pepper. The only thing I can think ...
2
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2answers
96 views

translation of scientific names [closed]

I am trying to determine the "translated" meanings (not seeking the common names) of different insects, (presently some bees and wasps). Does anyone know of a printed or internet resource that ...
5
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1answer
4k views

What is the proper format for genus and species names in latin?

When using the latin nomenclature for a fish in printed materials (such as Sander vitreus for walleye), what is the correct capitalization of each word? In this example, should 'S' be uppercase ...
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2answers
38 views

Could alpha-numeric taxonomy of fungi make things simpler?

Please feel free to construe this question broadly--I don't see why the question would not apply to branches of biology other than mycology. If the goal of taxonomy is to create classification of ...
1
vote
3answers
431 views

What does orbital mean in orbital frontal cortex?

Orbital frontal cortex is where decisions are made. What does the word orbital there mean? I looked around in wikipedia and never find it.
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2answers
219 views

Epinephrine vs. Adrenaline

Both names are widely used, with what appears to me as a slight prevalence of “epinephrine” in scientific literature and an overwhelming prevalence of “adrenaline” in popular media. Are there any ...
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0answers
169 views

On the definition of gDCW (gram dry cell weight)

I need some clarification on the concept of gram dry cell weight. The unit acronym gDCW stands for gram dry cell weight. My interpretation is that 1 gDCW is equivalent to 1 gram of dry cells, but I ...
3
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1answer
2k views

What is the definition of “dry weight” and “dry cell weight”?

As I understand it, the dry weight of something is its weight minus the weight of its water content. Is this the definition? What about dry cell weight?
2
votes
1answer
794 views

Difference between 'Orbit' and 'Globe' in eye anatomy?

What's the difference between 'Orbit' and 'Globe' in eye's anatomy. Do they refer to the same ? I encountered this in this text: ... ciliary ganglion, which is approximately 3 mm in size, and ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Neuromediator, Neuromodulator, Neurotransmitter?

Of these three words, perhaps Neurotransmitter is the most obvious. I took a look at Wikipedia page for Neuromodulation and found that this is pretty similar to Neurotransmitter too. I guess ...
5
votes
2answers
117 views

Are SLC52A2 and GPR172A really the same?

The official HUGO gene nomenclature page says that GPR172A (Gamma-hydroxybutyrate receptor) and SLC52A2 (riboflavin transporter, member 2) are the same. The sequence reported by Andriamampandry seems ...
24
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6answers
2k views

Why isn't a virus “alive”?

The recent news about a new supermassive virus being discovered got me thinking. What biological differences between viruses and cellular organisms have made viruses be deemed non-living?
2
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1answer
63 views

How to refer to person-derived and place-derived species names

Are there words that categorize latin specific epithets by how they're derived? Specifically, I was wondering if there exist adjectives to refer to: Person-derived species names as in Nothura darwini ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Polymorphism in cnidarians?

To me, the phenomenon of polymorphism in cnidarians is particularly troubling. I gather that it essentially refers to existence of various different forms or kinds of individuals, i.e. zooids and ...
2
votes
4answers
150 views

Are there more descriptive ways of naming genes and gene interactions?

I couldn't help but notice just how non-descriptive the gene names that modern genetics is using. Currently I'm reading "The new science of Evo Devo" by Sean B. Carroll and here are some examples of ...
3
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2answers
661 views

Why does Glutamine have the symbol Q?

Spent a half hour googling this and the best I could find was this: Now for some rhymes: Arginine = R. R we having fun yet? Asparagine = N The kNights of Ne say "Ne". Glutamine is a cute ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Gene & Protein nomenclature: N-Myc, c-Myc, et. al

Can someone explain (or point me to an explanation of) exactly what is meant by all the different symbols I see used for writing genes and proteins? I think I know that for genes, we use an italic ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

How are atoms in benzopyridines and benzopurines numbered?

I am well-aware of the numbering system used for the traditional bases, as seen below. My question is how are the atoms in the size-expanded bases seen in xDNA and xRNA numbered?
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the name of the fibrous strands that hold the seeds in a pumpkin?

If you cut open a pumpkin, the seeds are suspended inside the pumpkin by some fibrous, slimey strands. You can see them in the middle of this sliced-open pumpkin: I'm writing a post for the ...
19
votes
3answers
45k views

What is the difference between orthologs, paralogs and homologs?

These three terms are often misused in the literature. Many researchers seem to treat them as synonyms. So, what is the definition of each of these terms and how do they differ from one another?
3
votes
1answer
885 views

“Acellular” designation for organisms

Why do some biologists refer to single-celled organisms such as Amoeba and Paramecium as acellular (i.e., without cells) rather than unicellular (i.e., one cell)?
7
votes
2answers
122 views

Does the word “polymorphism” refer to the gene, the phenotype, or both?

In genetics, does the word "polymorphism" properly refer to genes, to phenotypes, or both? For example, if there are two alleles that lead to differences in the structure of the D2 neuroreceptor, ...
5
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1answer
299 views

Formal definition of a 'genetic trait reservoir'?

I've read the tomato genome paper in Nature published recently, and they describe the tomato genetic resource as a rich trait reservoir that will provide biological ...
4
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2answers
82 views

Genetic networks vs genetic architectures?

What is the difference between the terms genetic network and genetic architecture? I've heard both in a variety of contexts used by different people, so I am interested in what people think they mean, ...