Pathogenesis is the mechanism by which a disease is causing the disease. For bacteria this can be the secretion of a toxin which is toxic for the host.

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Secretion in Gram negative bacteria

Among the 6 secretion systems in bacteria, can these 6 ways be sorted out in the order of how harmful it is to the human host? Like say type 3 is highly virulent so that comes first, but I don't know ...
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Difference between modules in KEGG Module

The KEGG module M00115 includes a set of reactions while M00542 does not have any; it just shows the list of enzymes. Is the reaction set for M00542 still unknown?
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Regulation of V. cholerae virulence factors

So I know that several different environmental signals, such as pH, bile, and temperature, regulate virulence gene expression in V. cholerae. Specifically, they control expression of the genes ...
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Why is knowledge of bacterial pathogenesis important? [closed]

Why is knowledge of pathogenesis increased more and more for common bacterial pathogens? Most of these studies lack a near application in disease control such as vaccines or antibiotics. Examples: ...
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Do distinctions between dry, tickly and chesty coughs have any medical basis?

Background At least in Britain you normally come across distinct kinds of cough medicine "chesty", "dry" and "tickly". Questions Are "chesty", "dry" and "tickly" coughs always due to ...
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What is the name of systemic tension of muscles?

I meat a overtrained friend (25 years old) who cannot rest. He has all muscles and most of the skin very tense. He is practising regularly in gym and sleep badly. He moves like a stick figure and has ...
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Can inhibition of lymphocytes migration be a direct cause of chronic inflammation?

Here is the original slide: I am thinking about the "cord factor" sentence in a more general case. Assume you inhibit Leucocytes migration. How does this lead to accumulation of macrophages in the ...
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Fibrinous inflammation, exudate and scarring in monotonous movements and ageing

I have palpated many hard organs during my work and studies. I have seen many young and old people who have hard organs, like very hard shoulder - very common. I have interviewed some of them, some ...
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What is the difference between fibrogenesis and fibrosis?

Fibrosis is the formation of excess fibrous connective tissue in an organ or tissue in a reparative or reactive process. I used the word "fibrogenesis" as the outcome of acute inflammation (healing). ...
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Can pulmonary infarction be asymptomatic?

I think it can because there are many parts in lungs. Like for some COPD patients. However, I am not sure if COPD patients can have infarction. Lungs have parallel circulation. Red infarct is ...
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Pathogenesis of Chronic Venous Congestion in Lungs?

I am thinking how CVC in lungs lead to the left-sided heart failure.
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What is the pathogenuc mechanism of brown pigment lipofuscin in muscle atrophy?

I think it is autophagy. Lysosomal degradation. Autophagocytosis. Example of the brown pigment (lipofuscin) here: I am not sure if autophagy is the right answer to the "pathogenic" mechanism of ...
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Pathogenesis of chronic venous congestion in skin?

I think CVC cannot lead to heart failure primarily. So let's think its pathogenesis in skin now only. I think the pathogenesis is like this dilation of veins and capillaries due to impaired venous ...
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Can systemic intravascular thrombosis cause brain infarction?

I wonder if the thrombus can pass through the brain-blood barrier because I think small molecules like O2, CO2 and ethanol can pass it. Probably, in some diseases where the permeability of the barrier ...
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What are these white areas of coronary thrombosis?

Please, see the picture where the areas (1,2,3) look little yellow: I think these areas are fat, platelets and/or air. I think 3 is fat/platelets while 1 is air/platelets. There also exists white ...
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Are there any forms of heart failure where cell size decreases?

I think hypertrophy happens in most of the cases. However, I am not sure if hypertrophy always happens. I started to think about wet lungs (pulmonary reason for the left-sided heart failure). Can the ...
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Can systemic venous congestion caused by tumor?

I am thinking, if 1) little compressed superior caval vena and 2) some vein compression by tumor, can cause systemic venous congestion. I think this is only in rare occasions. However, the question ...
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What can thrombosis lead to?

I am thinking this question. Thrombosis can result in organisation of thrombus, sepsis thromboembolism, fibrinoid swelling adiposity. I fibrinoid swelling (edema) (4) can occur. Also, I think (3) ...
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Why do 6-8% of diphtheria patients do not develop natural immunity after being affected?

I am thinking of why some patients do not have natural immunity after exposure to the A-B toxin of diphthria. I think the A-B exotoxin is the key factor causing this disease and should trigger memory ...
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How host defends against S. pneumoniae capsule?

The host response involves at least phagocytosis and probably localised acute inflammatory response at least after the colonisation. I am thinking how the host can defend against pneumolysin which ...
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What does this sentence about toxemia and Clostridium tetani mean?

I know that Cl tetani is not invasive and strictly localised. I think toxemia means spread in the blood. I am thinking this sentence The volume of infected tissue is small, and the disease is ...
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Pathogenesis of Group B Streptococci and C5a

I am thinking the pathogenesis of the C5a in GBS. I think the pathogenesis happens like C5a-peptidase in acid environment (Sialic acid, capsule) $\to$ cleaves C'-derived Neu chemoattractant C5a ...