The study of diseases, including their causes and effects.

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Oral Fordyce spots

This is an image of a Fordyce spot I found while Googling. I don't know how to interpret this image. Is this an image of a single Fordyce spot? I mean "single" as in a single spot when viewed by the ...
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2answers
32 views

How do prions transmit their conformation to other proteins?

I was reading about prions and many sources say something to this effect: "Prions may propagate by transmitting their misfolded protein state: When a prion enters a healthy organism, it induces ...
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1answer
46 views

Finding confidence level of miRNA disease associations

I'm an undergraduate computer engineering student, and I have a project about bioinformatics. In this manner, I need to find prediction( or association I'm not sure the correct terminology) confidence ...
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1answer
14 views

What is the reason for 'microcytic' anaemia?

I know the causes for microcytic anaemia are Fe deficiency, prolonged inflammation, Thalessemia, Sideroblastic etc. All these logically point to a decrease in Haemoglobin synthesis - either Haeme or ...
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1answer
40 views

Why aren't we immune to the “cold” [duplicate]

As far as I know, people suffer from the cold since ever. Why didn't and don't we evolve to resist it?
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26 views

Can the restless leg syndrome may have been caused due to natural selection? [closed]

Disclaimer: I don't know how much restless the leg has to be, in order to be considered a syndrome. RLS runs not only in my family but also several people in the locality. My hypothesis is that RLS ...
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2answers
9k views

Can HIV be transmitted via mosquitos?

It is known that HIV is usually transmitted by direct blood or body fluid contact between an infected individual and a healthy person (like blood transfusion or needle sharing): Suppose a mosquito ...
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39 views

Why doesn't the Tsetse fly wipe out all animal life in its range?

The Tsetse fly, which is native to interior West Africa, carries the protozoan that causes sleeping sickness, a disease which was apparently invariably fatal before the advent of modern medications. ...
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1k views

Why doesn't blood remain on a mosquito's proboscis in quantities that could spread blood-borne diseases?

We know that HIV can't be transmitted by mosquitos, and nor can other highly virulent viruses that are transmitted through blood and bodily fluid exchanges, such as Ebola (thankfully!). Marcus Junius ...
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726 views

What is the difference between clinical and non-clinical depression, and is there a term for different severity of the bipolar disorder?

I was looking for a term which describes a bipolar disorder of lesser severity. I know from experience from someone I know well, what a very severe case of the bipolar disorder looks like, when an ...
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1answer
55 views

Why might dogs get sick less frequently than their owners?

An article I was reading cited this study result "A comparison of 2473 pairs of dogs and their owners found that dogs were about 50 per cent less likely to have had two or more acute illnesses in the ...
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31 views

Is diarrhoea advantageous to the microbe?

Diarrhoea is a common side effect of many feco-orally transmitted bacterial infections. How does diarrhoea help the pathogen? Should it not have a selective evolutionary advantage? Do all symptoms of ...
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431 views

Can you Transfer Cancer Between People via Saliva or other Bodily Fluids?

This may sound like a strange question. But could a Cancerous cell be transferred from one person to another from Oral contact e.g. Through Saliva, or other exchange of bodily fluids? I know that ...
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86 views

Can the spinal cord contain an “epileptic focus”?

I was wondering, is there a possibility of an something similar to an epileptic focus to exist within the spinal cord? Note I am using the terminology "epileptic" loosely here, principally for the ...
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54 views

Grouping OMIM disease codes

I have ~100 sets of genes, and each set includes between 2 and 70 genes. I'd like to perform an enrichment analysis on each of these sets to test if they're enriched for OMIM disease labels. However, ...
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110 views

What is the difference between AIDS and SCID? [closed]

AIDS acquired immune deficiency syndrome According to wikipedia, Caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Following initial infection, a person may not notice any ...
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48 views

Which disorders are fully concordant?

I work in neuroscience, mostly Alzheimer's disease (AD), with some work in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The work is in gene regulation and epigenomics. I'm familiar with monozygotic twin (MZ) ...
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18 views

Do plant and animal bacterial pathogen differ too much?

I will be involved in a plant disease produced by a bacterial pathogen, Acidovorax citrulli. I've previously worked with animal pathogens such as Haemophilus parasuis. Are there any big differences ...
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37 views

What is effect of sperm in blood?

Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Clostridium perfringens all produce hyaluronidase. Each of these bacteria are pathogens (use hyaluronidase as a virulence factor to destroy the ...
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53 views

How would the immune system respond to antigens and food poisoning?

QUESTION: How does this information explain the likelihood of a more violent response in someone who has already had food poisoning caused by salmonella bacteria WHAT I KNOW: In the first exposure, ...
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Why do kupffer cells not attack sporozoites of malaria?

During malaria, why don't kuppfer cells (hepatic macrophages) attack the plasmodium and stop schizogony, thus saving us from the disease?
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1answer
45 views

Explanation of the ‘cherry red spot' in Tay Sachs disease

In Tay Sachs disease, a hallmark symptom is a cherry red spot in the macula of the eye surrounded by a halo of white. I understand that the ganglion cells, which are higher in numbers around the ...
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1answer
25 views

Why are vegetations in Infective endocarditis common on the atrial side?

Robbin's Pathology says that vegetations of IE are more common on the atrial side in AV valves. In Liebmann Sack's Endocarditis, which is a sterile (non bacterial) type of endocarditis, the underside ...
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1answer
53 views

How was gene therapy able to cure diseases through the transformation of actively dividing cells?

I thought that gene therapy, when performed on target cells that regenerate themselves constantly, can be effective for a limited time only. I.e., the effect gradually wears off after a while, ...
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1answer
73 views

What are most common natural causes of death? [closed]

What are most frequently occurring natural causes of death?
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44 views

On ways to treat cancer [closed]

If an area that has tumours is affected by some non-lethal disease would it kill the cancer cells first since the tumour cells are more 'unstable' ? Could this non-lethal disease 'process' be ...
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1answer
450 views

Why is the species-diversity of deadly parasites greatest in the tropics?

There are so many parasites living in tropical regions of Africa, South America, or Asia, but very few in Europe or North America. Is this due to climate, or are there other reasons? Many of the ...
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3k views

Why does a blood test show ethanol when no alcohol was consumed?

Why would ethanol show up in a blood test if a person had not been drinking alcohol in many years. What are other reasons for showing ethanol?
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What causes the range of severity of neurological deficits in Down's syndrome?

It's known that the severity of symptoms caused by a trisomy 21 varies from individual to individual. Part of the explanation for this range of severity is the finding that 94% of Down's syndrome ...
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3answers
3k views

How do viruses or bacteria survive outside the body long enough to spread?

Say I cough on my table, then someone else touches it and picks up something I've got... how is it that these things can live outside the body, how long can they manage it, and how long is generally ...
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42 views

What is meningitis? [closed]

I know that meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges surrounding the brain and the spinal cord. But I still don't understand this definition. If you can broaden the definition, please do.
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25 views

Cheap, effective searching for pathogenes?

Background: some time ago, I suffered from some recurrent sickness, with frequency of about 2 weeks. As far as I learned, this is a sure sign of an infection. I've been to the doctors, and they did ...
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2answers
157 views

Do people with gout live longer?

Antioxidants reduce damage to tissue (by scavenging the free radicals) and thus may reduce ageing.It is known that Uric acid is a very good antioxidant. People with gout have excess accumulation of ...
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35 views

Does sickle cell anaemia protect a victim against malaria? [duplicate]

My biology textbook says that a person with sickle cell anaemia is less prone to malaria. Why is that so? I'm guessing that its because the malarial parasite needs human RBCs for completing its life ...
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1answer
55 views

Why does HPV Infect Squamous Epithelial Cells and Not Others?

I've seen this question about HPV and the reference therein. The link states "Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a DNA virus that presents tropism for epithelial cells, causing infections of the skin and ...
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124 views

Why is AIDS not a congenital disease?

AIDS can easily pass from mother to the newborn, then why do we not consider it to be a congenital disease (or syndrome)
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19 views

Comparing genetics [closed]

Compare the possible effect on an individual of knowing that they have genes predisposing them to type-2 diabetes and the dominant allele that causes Huntington's disease. I am not sure about the way ...
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2answers
130 views

How “exactly” is Rabies transmitted?

Context: I know a person which has developed a sort of "phobia" with respect to touching things that has (even the slighest) chance of being in contact with something that can transmit rabies. For ...
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112 views

How much should one smoke in order to prevent Parkinson's? [closed]

There are studies who claim that nicotine has a neuroprotective effect against Parkinson's(such as this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11772120) What would be the minimum amount of ...
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Of people who develop Alzheimer disease, are those people genetically predisposed to it?

I have read a lot lately about microbiological pathogens that are found in blood vessels in the brain of patient's with Alzheimer disease (positive association). So, I am confused whether there are ...
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1answer
186 views

Can androgen-insensitive genetic-males get pregnant?

According to the linked report, people with androgen insensitivity syndrome appear as male, but have both feminine and masculine outer genitalia. However, I was not able to find out whether their ...
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2answers
107 views

Do humans contract more physical sicknesses and diseases than animals do? [duplicate]

I wondered: If I get into the library and look into the medical section it is evident that there are thousands and thousands of different human physical diseases. But if I look into the section of ...
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1answer
68 views

Why does a Urinary Tract Infection cause a strong, persistent urge to urinate?

There are plenty of articles on the fact the a urinary tract infection (UTI) causes frequent and urgent urination. For example; on this National Institutes of Health webpage. My question is: Why ...
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1answer
63 views

How can hyperthyroidism induce osteoporosis?

It says in my physiology notes that hyperthyroidism can cause osteoporosis. I've been trying to figure out how this could be possible for a little more than an hour now. Every article that I look at ...
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1answer
745 views

Why is there no cure for Dandruff?

It looks like a simple problem, affecting almost half of the population at the post-pubertal age and of any gender and ethnicity [wikipedia]. What is so complex about finding a cure? Also, if you know ...
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1answer
8k views

Is diabetes mellitus a sex-linked disease?

There are two types of diabetes mellitus. a. Type 1 diabetes mellitus b. Type 2 diabetes melliuts Is either of them a sex linked disease? Can either one be inherited? My book says, "this disease is ...
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2answers
529 views

Can people with AIDS get tattoos?

When I do a Google search, most of the results are about whether or not people can get HIV / AIDS from getting a tattoo through dirt needles. I am, however, curious whether or not it is possible to ...
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2answers
188 views

Difference between protozoa, protists, protoctista?

Are these different classes of organisms or simply different names for the same?
5
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1answer
312 views

Inheritance of Huntington's disease

People with Huntington's disease have HTT genes with more than 37 copies of CAG repeat. The risk of extra copies being generated is higher during sperm formation than during ovum formation. Why is it ...
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percentage of animal diseases caused by bacteria?

I know this is a long shot, but what is the approximate percentage out of all the animal diseases that are caused by bacteria? One of the Q&A websites answer it as 90, but is there any conclusive ...