Pharmacology is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function

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What is the difference between a hormone and a drug?

This question is based primarily on definitions. A common dictionary definition is that a drug is: any substance other than food, that when inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, absorbed via a ...
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25 views

Question about Enzyme Inhibition in relation to Aspirin

I've been trying to learn a bit more about pharmacology, so bear with my ignorance. In short, I see that aspirin (in part) works by inhibiting cycloxygenase isoenzymes and that this inhibiting is ...
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11 views

iPSC in drug discovery

Pluripotent stem cells are very popular and lots of research has been conducted to use these cells as a tool for drug discovery. My question is how many years would it theoretically safe is we could ...
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1answer
27 views

Is 5-HTP a SSRI?

Can 5-Hydroxytryptophan (oxitriptan) be categorized as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)? Since they both act on the serotonin pathway and are used to treat depression and other mood ...
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2answers
94 views

Does caffeine actually enhance cognition?

I have heard, respectively: Caffeine measurably enhances cognitive function. Caffeine does not measurably enhance cognitive function in any significant way. Caffeine enhances cognitive function, but ...
3
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1answer
16 views

Is receptor antagonism just long-term binding?

By my understanding, a substance that binds to a receptor and activates it is called an agonist, while a substance that binds to a receptor without activating it is called an antagonist. (Wiki) What ...
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76 views

Why is alcohol such a weak drug?

Most day to day drugs such as caffeine and paracetamol require a dosage in milligrams to have the desired effect. Why then, does it take many tens of grams of alcohol to have a tangible/noticeable ...
3
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1answer
35 views

What does “generalisation” mean?

I am trying to understand a paper about ethanol: "Generalisation of ethanol with drug mixtures containing a positive modulator of the GABAA receptor and an NMDA antagonist" (Stolerman & Olufsen, ...
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39 views

How does glucose delivered intraperitoneal (i.p.) get into the peripheral circulation?

Intraperitoneal delivery of drugs or fluids is something that occurs much more frequently in veterinary medicine than clinical medicine. In veterinary medicine or scientific studies using animals, ...
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1answer
29 views

Do pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the drug in animals are the same as in human?

I'm trying to understand the purpose of different clinical trial phases, and the following question comes into my mind : Do pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the drug in animals are the ...
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24 views

What is the effect of sodium chloride on head lice?

There are a lot of products that claim to kill lice and eggs. The main ingredient is sodium chloride. How does it work? I wonder if it has something to do with osmotic effects?
3
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1answer
62 views

What do proton pump inhibitors do?

I know that sodium azide and 2,4-DNPH inhibit proton pumps. The azide is called an inhibitor and 2,4-DNP is called uncoupler. I want to know what's the difference between the mechanisms of action of ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Aspirin - does it inhibit enzyme of thromboxane?

This is a diagram a friend showed me about the drug aspirin, where we were arguing which enzyme it prevents. Aspirin is known to inhibit the production of prostaglandins. However, it also serves ...
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40 views

Does medication make the body dependent? [closed]

First of, I know of course that certain medication can cause an addiction if incorrectly used. But as far as I understand it, drugs prone to cause addiction have some agent in it, that makes them ...
12
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1answer
289 views

How does paracetamol work?

Hinz et al. 2008 found that COX-2 may be inhibited by paracetamol, and this is attributed to it's analgesic and antipyretic properties. However there are other more recent claims from Andersson et ...
2
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2answers
94 views

Blood draw from the elderly or those with tiny veins

A lot of people have very small veins making it next to impossible to draw blood. Would a nitroglycerin tablet (or some other vasodilator) before drawing blood help to enlarge veins?
3
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18 views

What are necessary parameters for a tissue scaffold to be biodegradable?`

I am a mechanical engineer with little biological experience, but I have recently been looking at tissue scaffoldings. My current understanding is as follows, but may be flawed. I would appreciate ...
6
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1answer
108 views

How to determine sensitivity in a dose-response curve?

In a dose-response curve the % inhibition can be plotted against concentration antagonist. In our case, the effect of the antagonist is tested in different genetic variants of a microbe. When trying ...
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3answers
92 views

Homeopathy is placebo, but isn't placebo good?

I never considered homeopathy as a serious and scientific medicine, and now we have plenty of evidence supporting this ...
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21 views

How do macromolecules (large drugs) in the eye reach the bloodstream and what are the relative significances of these pathways?

I am considering the elimination pathways for antibodies (50-150 kDa) from the vitreous humour to the blood stream. My overarching question is what is the most significant route such antibodies could ...
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1answer
33 views

Infection of urinary tract if the pH of urine is made alkaline

It is very well known that drugs like phenobarbiton,morphine are unionized, lipid soluble.So,in case if there is toxicity due to these drugs,the only way to save the patient is make the pH of urine ...
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31 views

Genotype-Phenotype databases?

Beyond the Stanford HIV database, what other databases out there provide a dataset linking virus/bacterial genotype to quantitative phenotype? I'm looking for high quality datasets to test machine ...
3
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2answers
128 views

How do antibiotics create drug-resistant strains

I've heard for years that low-level use of antibiotics causes the spread of drug-resistant strains of bacteria, but the explanations always fall short. I understand mutations and natural selection, ...
2
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1answer
117 views

Do drugs' levo isomers have a better interaction with the receptors in our body than dextro isomers?

Examples of levo drugs include levothyroxine, levocitrizine, and levodopa. Is there any specific reason why the receptors in our body exhibit this stereoisomerism and hold a high preference for the ...
4
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1answer
64 views

How does Tylenol relieve pain without making me drowsy?

So I have a crown that popped out and has been killing me, I've lived on a steady diet of Tylenol since it popped out. I've noticed that aside from killing most of the pain from the tooth, the tylenol ...
3
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1answer
92 views

Difficulty in finding protein inhibition drugs

I was reading an article on a recent identification of a PARP-14 protein in cancer cells that is responsible for production of additional glucose which keeps cancer cells from dying, and that a ...
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44 views

Western blot extrange band

I performed a WB using plasma rats and monkeys samples with anti ubiquitin K-48 antibody. In every sample the antibody binds something and it appears a specific band that seems to be 71kDa. When I ...
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Birth control hormones in the water? Or not?

This prior question talks about natural estrogen (TL;DR: Months to years): How quickly do estrogens break down in the environment? Ref: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/485441a A lot of media has said, ...
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512 views

Do spinal cord reflexes (such as the knee-jerk reflex) continue to function under general anaesthesia?

The knee-jerk reflex (patellar reflex) is an example of a stretch reflex (myotatic reflex). Stretch reflexes are monosynaptic reflexes happening in the spinal cord without involvement of the brain. ...
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2answers
51 views

Chemotherapy - Hair loss

Chemotherapy kills cancer cells by targeting rapidly growing cells. That is why patients are loosing hair as well. My question is, why chemo related hair loss is temporary ? The docs say it is ...
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18 views

Source of journals collecting titles of scientific publications regarding clinical trials with dogs fed medicinal herbs

After some time researching on the web, you can find a lot of websites telling you that some herbs may have or have specific properties(unfortunately most seem to be "advertised" as if they were ...
4
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40 views

How does drug-induced photosensitivity work?

Some drugs (tetracyclines, for instance) can cause photosensitivity reactions—that is, some patients become extremely sensitive to the sun, developing rashes or inflammation after spending time ...
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1answer
115 views

How much penicillinase is needed to deactivate 125mg of amoxicillin?

How much penicillinase is needed to deactivate 125mg of amoxicillin? Penicillinase in penase concentrate from CPC. 20,000 Levy Units/ml/min I need IU of 125 mg of amoxicillin. Please note that the ...
2
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1answer
272 views

Have webs woven by LSD-intoxicated spiders ever been studied for their efficiency in fly catching?

I ask, because I have a different interpretation of the experiments performed on web-weaving spiders. The famous Robert Pirsig maintains that LSD is somehow helpful to web-weaving spiders, because it ...
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22 views

What is the permeability of proteins across the hyaloid membrane of vitreous to retina?

Does anyone know of any experimental work to test the permeability of the hyaloid membrane between the vitreous humour of the eye to the retina to proteins? Currently the largest molecule I can find ...
4
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75 views

Can the liver prioritize it's metabolizing potential?

Let's assume we have two toxins - one of which is routinely metabolized by the liver, and the other is new to the organism (consider for example alcohol in a heavy drinker and any other drug that is ...
4
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1answer
57 views

If a blocker prevents repolarization, will the neuron be stuck in a depolarized state forever?

Potassium channels help to repolarize the cell after depolarization. But if the potassium channels are blocked, potassium ions cannot flow out of the cell to increase the membrane potential. Thus, one ...
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What's the relationship between Drugbank drugs and SMPDB pathways?

In the 'pathway browse' panel SMPDB pathways and their corresponding Drugbank drugs are listed. What are the relationships between the drugs and the pathways? Some listed drugs are not in the ...
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1answer
51 views

Why doesn't Manipulated Virus for Cancer Cure Work [closed]

I'm not a biologist but I have an idea for a cure for cancer and it is very simple and probably has flaws (if it worked it probrably wouldn't be a cure for all) or is not possible but ... I'm still ...
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7 views

How do drugs (or other molecules) move between the vitreous humour and aqueous humour of the eye? [duplicate]

My question is regarding the biological nature of the separation between the vitreous humour and aqueous humour of the human (or mammal) eye. What connects the two in terms of the passive transport of ...
3
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3answers
230 views

Why is dopamine or a dopamine-receptor agonist not pumped into the brain of Parkinson patients?

I am aware that dopamine cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, but can't it be pumped inside the cerebrospinal fluid via some permanent tube implant? Wouldn't Parkinson patients chose that over ...
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39 views

Can I explain the kinetics of a ligand looking at the ligand-protein co-structure?

Can I explain the kinetics of a ligand binding to a target protein (association and dissociation rates) by looking at the protein-ligand co-structure? Editing my question after a few comments: I ...
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0answers
414 views

IC50 and area under the curve

I was hoping to get some clarification on how drug response data (i.e. IC50) are presented. On publicly available datasets like Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer, area under the curve (AUC) ...
2
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2answers
199 views

Defining Resistance and Sensitivity Thresholds for IC50

I have a dataset containing IC50 data for each of my cell lines and up to 80 drugs. Basically for each drug I want to be able to define an IC50 threshold where if a cell line has an IC50 above that ...
5
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2answers
131 views

Why is cisplatin a very potent antineoplastic for testicular cancer, but not necessarily for other cancers?

Cisplatin (structure below) is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent which is very effective in the treatment of some cancers. Its introduction was responsible for improving the cure rate for ...
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1answer
735 views

Does inhaling glue (glue sniffing) reduce appetite?

I have heard from many homeless people that they sniff glue just to reduce appetite, as it comes cheap and is more affordable than actual food. Is this true, and if yes, why? This is totally opposite ...
0
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1answer
193 views

How does amiodarone act as an alpha and beta blocker?

Amiodarone is potassium channel blocker but also voltage-gated Na+ channel blocker according to Pubchem. However, upon reading my notes I discovered Amiodarone blocks potassium channels and block ...
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1answer
87 views

Why is Benzylpenicillin better in Bacterial Meningitis than Amoxicillin?

Both are beta lactams. However, benzylpenicillin, which is also called penicillin G i.e. narrow group antibiotic. I have now in both the following as a mechanism of action Binds to PBP in ...
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1answer
63 views

Is dinoprost PGF2-alpha or PGE2?

In many places it says PGF2-alpha. Now, I am thinking PGE2 is a substype of PGF2-alpha. However, I am not sure. Is dinoprost PGE2?
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3answers
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Doxorubicin's intercalant and topoisomerase inhibition in leukemia?

I am thinking the role of doxorubicin's pathways in cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma: topoisomerase inhibitor and inhibit DNA activity intercalant - intercalant DNA bases and inhibit DNA ...